"Take 9-11. That means something in the United States. The “world changed” after 9-11. Well, do a slight thought experiment. Suppose that on 9-11 the planes had bombed the White House, suppose they’d killed the president, established a military dictatorship, quickly killed thousands, tortured tens of thousands more, set up a major international terror center that was carrying out assassinations, overthrowing governments all over the place, installing other dictatorships, and drove the country into one of the worst depressions in its history and had to call on the state to bail them out. Suppose that had happened? It did happen. On the first 9-11 in 1973. Except we were responsible for it, so it didn’t happen. That’s Allende’s Chile. You can’t imagine the media talking about this."

Noam Chomsky (via obstacleuno)

this is fucking important and should be posted everywhere, every single day.

never forget.

also, if you haven’t read The Shock Doctrine, check that shit out immediately.

(via farahjoon)

(Source: asdfcriiiis, via queerthanks)

hydri:

If you harassed a Muslim or seemingly middle eastern person just because “It’s 9/11 and it’s all their fault!!!!” you need to get kicked in the face by a person wearing metal cleats. 

We were all surprised by what what happened in New York on 9/11/2001

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

but not all of us were SHOCKED. Knowing the immense crimes of U.S. imperialism, the uncounted deaths it has heaped on the peoples of the Middle East and the rest of the world in the name of profit, what surprised me the most was that it took so long for someone to respond in kind.

Why the Reaction Is Different When the Terrorist Is White

“Hold the victims constant and give the perpetrator the last name Mohammed. Does anyone think for a moment that such an attack wouldn’t still be the most discussed story at Fox News and National Review? …

Attacks like his are disconcerting to some white Americans for a seldom acknowledged reason. Since 9/11, many Americans have conflated terrorism with Muslims; and having done so, they’ve tolerated or supported counterterrorism policies safe in the presumption that people unlike them would bear their brunt. (If Mayor Bloomberg and the NYPD sent officers beyond the boundaries of New York City to secretly spy on evangelical Christian students or Israeli students or students who own handguns the national backlash would be swift, brutal, and decisive. The revelation of secret spying on Muslim American students was mostly defended or ignored.)      

In the name of counterterrorism, many Americans have given their assent to indefinite detention, the criminalization of gifts to certain charities, the extrajudicial assassination of American citizens, and a sprawling, opaque homeland security bureaucracy; many have also advocated policies like torture or racial profiling that are not presently part of official anti-terror policy. What if white Americans were as likely as Muslims to be victimized by those policies? “

(via darkjez)

Hierarchical Violence

cultureofresistance:

warriorsrise:

How come 9/11 is remembered and mourned every year, but 3000+ Sudanese died last week and hardly anyone hears about it? I don’t wanna compare the two, but it just seems like America is valued at the highest while killing people in other countries is just systematic and alright. Those deaths were due to ethnic clashes, but why are ‘race riots’ in some other country alright but not here? Whaaaaat am I saying? I wish we didn’t even have any borders. Big problem.

Premise Four: Civilization is based on a clearly defined and widely accepted yet often unarticulated hierarchy. Violence done by those higher on the hierarchy to those lower is nearly always invisible, that is, unnoticed. When it is noticed, it is fully rationalized. Violence done by those lower on the hierarchy to those higher is unthinkable, and when it does occur is regarded with shock, horror, and the fetishization of the victims.

(Source: thepeacefulterrorist, via liberationista-deactivated20130)

verbalresistance:

Kuala Lumpur War Crimes tribunal: Bush and Blair guilty
 A war crimes tribunal in Malaysia offers a devastating critique of international criminal law institutions today.
In Kuala Lumpur, after two years of investigation by the Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Commission (KLWCC), a tribunal (the Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Tribunal, or KLWCT) consisting of five judges with judicial and academic backgrounds reached a unanimous verdict that found George W Bush and Tony Blair guilty of crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, and genocide as a result of their roles in the Iraq War.
The proceedings took place over a four-day period from November 19-22, and included an opportunity for court-appointed defense counsel to offer the tribunal arguments and evidence on behalf of the absent defendants. They had been invited to offer their own defense or send a representative, but declined to do so. The prosecution team was headed by two prominent legal personalities with strong professional legal credentials: Gurdeal Singh Nijar and Francis Boyle. The verdict issued on November 22, 2011 happens to coincide with the 48th anniversary of the assassination of John F Kennedy.
The tribunal acknowledged that its verdict was not enforceable in a normal manner associated with a criminal court operating within a sovereign state or as constituted by international agreement, as is the case with the International Criminal Court. But the KLWCT followed a juridical procedure purported to operate in a legally responsible manner. This would endow its findings and recommendations with a legal weight expected to extend beyond a moral condemnation of the defendants, but in a manner that is not entirely evident.
The KLWCT added two “Orders” to its verdict that had been adopted in accordance with the charter of the KLWCC that controlled the operating framework of the tribunal:

1) Report the findings of guilt of the two accused former heads of state to the International Criminal Court in The Hague; and 2) Enter the names of Bush and Blair in the Register of War Criminals maintained by the KLWCC.

The tribunal also added several recommendations to its verdict:

1) Report findings in accord with Part VI (calling for future accountability) of the Nuremberg Judgment of 1945 addressing crimes of surviving political and military leaders of Nazi Germany; 2) File reports of genocide and crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court in The Hague; 3) Approach the UN General Assembly to pass a resolution demanding that the United States end its occupation of Iraq; 4) Communicate the findings of the tribunal to all members of the Rome Statute (which governs the International Criminal Court) and to all states asserting Universal Jurisdiction that allows for the prosecution of international crimes in national courts; and 5) Urge the UN Security Council to take responsibility to ensure that full sovereign rights are vested in the people of Iraq and that the independence of its government be protected by a UN peacekeeping force

These civil society legal initiatives are an outgrowth of a  longer-term project undertaken by the controversial former Malaysian  head of state, Mahathir Mohamed, to challenge American-led militarism  and to mobilise the global South to mount an all-out struggle against  the war system.
This vision of a revitalised struggle against war and post-colonial  imperialism was comprehensively set forth in Mahathir’s remarkable  anti-war speech of February 24, 2003, while still prime minister,  welcoming the Non-Aligned Movement to Kuala Lumpur for its thirteenth  summit…
Read More: aljazeera.net

verbalresistance:

Kuala Lumpur War Crimes tribunal: Bush and Blair guilty

A war crimes tribunal in Malaysia offers a devastating critique of international criminal law institutions today.

In Kuala Lumpur, after two years of investigation by the Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Commission (KLWCC), a tribunal (the Kuala Lumpur War Crimes Tribunal, or KLWCT) consisting of five judges with judicial and academic backgrounds reached a unanimous verdict that found George W Bush and Tony Blair guilty of crimes against peace, crimes against humanity, and genocide as a result of their roles in the Iraq War.

The proceedings took place over a four-day period from November 19-22, and included an opportunity for court-appointed defense counsel to offer the tribunal arguments and evidence on behalf of the absent defendants. They had been invited to offer their own defense or send a representative, but declined to do so. The prosecution team was headed by two prominent legal personalities with strong professional legal credentials: Gurdeal Singh Nijar and Francis Boyle. The verdict issued on November 22, 2011 happens to coincide with the 48th anniversary of the assassination of John F Kennedy.

The tribunal acknowledged that its verdict was not enforceable in a normal manner associated with a criminal court operating within a sovereign state or as constituted by international agreement, as is the case with the International Criminal Court. But the KLWCT followed a juridical procedure purported to operate in a legally responsible manner. This would endow its findings and recommendations with a legal weight expected to extend beyond a moral condemnation of the defendants, but in a manner that is not entirely evident.

The KLWCT added two “Orders” to its verdict that had been adopted in accordance with the charter of the KLWCC that controlled the operating framework of the tribunal:

1) Report the findings of guilt of the two accused former heads of state to the International Criminal Court in The Hague; and
2) Enter the names of Bush and Blair in the Register of War Criminals maintained by the KLWCC.

The tribunal also added several recommendations to its verdict:

1) Report findings in accord with Part VI (calling for future accountability) of the Nuremberg Judgment of 1945 addressing crimes of surviving political and military leaders of Nazi Germany;
2)
File reports of genocide and crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court in The Hague;
3)
Approach the UN General Assembly to pass a resolution demanding that the United States end its occupation of Iraq;
4) Communicate the findings of the tribunal to all members of the Rome Statute (which governs the International Criminal Court) and to all states asserting Universal Jurisdiction that allows for the prosecution of international crimes in national courts; and
5) Urge the UN Security Council to take responsibility to ensure that full sovereign rights are vested in the people of Iraq and that the independence of its government be protected by a UN peacekeeping force

These civil society legal initiatives are an outgrowth of a longer-term project undertaken by the controversial former Malaysian head of state, Mahathir Mohamed, to challenge American-led militarism and to mobilise the global South to mount an all-out struggle against the war system.

This vision of a revitalised struggle against war and post-colonial imperialism was comprehensively set forth in Mahathir’s remarkable anti-war speech of February 24, 2003, while still prime minister, welcoming the Non-Aligned Movement to Kuala Lumpur for its thirteenth summit…

Read More: aljazeera.net

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

mycupofchai:


Balbir Singh Sodhi (1949 - September 15, 2001) was a Mesa, Arizona, Service Station owner who was murdered in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks. His death made national and international headlines because his was the first of several cases across the United States that were reported to the police as acts of retaliation for the terrorist attacks. 
 
Born in Punjab, India, he was a member of the Sikh religion. He moved to Los Angeles in 1989, where he worked as a taxi driver. He later relocated to San Francisco, where he continued to work in that capacity. He saved enough money to buy a gas station in Phoenix, and then he moved there.
On September 15, 2001, while planting flowers outside his Mesa convenience store, he was shot five times by a gunman and died instantly. Apparently, he had been confused with a person of Middle Eastern ethnicity because of the clothes he wore, as well as, his turban and his beard. Within 25 minutes of his death, the Phoenix police reported four further attacks on people who either were Middle Easterners or who dressed with clothes thought to be worn by Middle Easterners. His senseless death shocked many Americans and the US Congress moved quickly to condemn such acts of violence aimed at Sikhs by ignorant vigilantes.
His killer, Frank Roque 44, who had shouted, “I am a patriot” while being arrested, was convicted (September 30) of first-degree murder in the Singh case. On October 10, dismissing defence claims of diminished mental responsibility (Roque has a history of schizophrenia and of hearing voices), jurors at Maricopa County Superior Court sentenced him to face the death penalty. In August 2006, Arizona Supreme Court overturned Roque’s death sentence in return for a sentence of life in prison.
On August 4, 2002, less than a year after Balbir’s death, his younger brother Sukhpal was shot to death while driving his taxicab in San Francisco, apparently killed by a stray bullet from a nearby gang fight. In response to this second tragedy, Balbir’s son, Sukhwinder said, “What are you going to do with anger? We like peace and we are a peaceful people.”

Always remember.

mycupofchai:

Balbir Singh Sodhi (1949 - September 15, 2001) was a Mesa, Arizona, Service Station owner who was murdered in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks. His death made national and international headlines because his was the first of several cases across the United States that were reported to the police as acts of retaliation for the terrorist attacks. 

Born in Punjab, India, he was a member of the Sikh religion. He moved to Los Angeles in 1989, where he worked as a taxi driver. He later relocated to San Francisco, where he continued to work in that capacity. He saved enough money to buy a gas station in Phoenix, and then he moved there.

On September 15, 2001, while planting flowers outside his Mesa convenience store, he was shot five times by a gunman and died instantly. Apparently, he had been confused with a person of Middle Eastern ethnicity because of the clothes he wore, as well as, his turban and his beard. Within 25 minutes of his death, the Phoenix police reported four further attacks on people who either were Middle Easterners or who dressed with clothes thought to be worn by Middle Easterners. His senseless death shocked many Americans and the US Congress moved quickly to condemn such acts of violence aimed at Sikhs by ignorant vigilantes.

His killer, Frank Roque 44, who had shouted, “I am a patriot” while being arrested, was convicted (September 30) of first-degree murder in the Singh case. On October 10, dismissing defence claims of diminished mental responsibility (Roque has a history of schizophrenia and of hearing voices), jurors at Maricopa County Superior Court sentenced him to face the death penalty. In August 2006, Arizona Supreme Court overturned Roque’s death sentence in return for a sentence of life in prison.

On August 4, 2002, less than a year after Balbir’s death, his younger brother Sukhpal was shot to death while driving his taxicab in San Francisco, apparently killed by a stray bullet from a nearby gang fight. In response to this second tragedy, Balbir’s son, Sukhwinder said, “What are you going to do with anger? We like peace and we are a peaceful people.”

Always remember.

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)

delisubthefemmecub:

fromonesurvivortoanother:

Suheir Hammad - First Writing Since

The Palestinian American poet’s experience of 9/11 and racism.

one more person asked me if i knew the hijackers.
one more motherfucker asked me what navy my brother is in.
one more person assumed no arabs or muslims were killed.
one more person assumed they know me, or that i represent a people.
or that a people represent an evil. or that evil is as simple as a
flag and words on a page.

we did not vilify all white men when mcveigh bombed oklahoma.
america did not give out his family’s addresses or where he went to
church. or blame the bible or pat robertson.

and when the networks air footage of palestinians dancing in the
street, there is no apology that hungry children are bribed with
sweets that turn their teeth brown. that correspondents edit images.
that archives are there to facilitate lazy and inaccurate
journalism.

and when we talk about holy books and hooded men and death, why do we
never mention the kkk?

Full text here.

so many tears

(via numol)

schoolis4chumps:

10-of-cups:

just put in in perspective… no offense ment. but really?

how does this only have 13 notes?

schoolis4chumps:

10-of-cups:

just put in in perspective… no offense ment. but really?

how does this only have 13 notes?

(Source: invertedkingofcups, via paxamericana)

zeitvox:

Bush’s Tragic LegacyHow 9/11 Triggered America’s Decline

Five percent of Americans buy almost 40 percent of all consumer goods sold in the country… The country is at war with itself…
Like no other country, the US became great because of its openness. Now, it has become distrustful, fearful and defensive — against Muslims, against foreigners, against anyone who is different. Citizen militias hunt down illegal immigrants, and many people can still not accept having a black president in the White House.
“American exceptionalism” was always the US’s trump card. The new candidates for the White House still refer to it in the election campaign, but it sounds like a hollow mantra — one of those election promises that shouldn’t be examined too closely.  >continue<

The noise about exceptionalism is inversely proportional to its merit. It cannot be asserted. For after all, being exceptional is a quality conferred by recognition.
photo: its-so-sad  |  h/t brookynmutt

zeitvox:

Bush’s Tragic Legacy
How 9/11 Triggered America’s Decline

Five percent of Americans buy almost 40 percent of all consumer goods sold in the country… The country is at war with itself…

Like no other country, the US became great because of its openness. Now, it has become distrustful, fearful and defensive — against Muslims, against foreigners, against anyone who is different. Citizen militias hunt down illegal immigrants, and many people can still not accept having a black president in the White House.

“American exceptionalism” was always the US’s trump card. The new candidates for the White House still refer to it in the election campaign, but it sounds like a hollow mantra — one of those election promises that shouldn’t be examined too closely.  >continue<

The noise about exceptionalism is inversely proportional to its merit. It cannot be asserted. For after all, being exceptional is a quality conferred by recognition.

photo: its-so-sad  |  h/t brookynmutt

(via paxamericana)

Muslims Plan 9/11 Memorial Protest

miniar:

theredwhiteandnews:

Muslim groups are planning on disrupting the moment of silence outside the US Embassy in London on the 10 year anniversary of 9/11.

Okay, let’s start correcting you right here. 

It’s “group”, not groups.

Singular.

The main stream media won’t tell you or show you that. Since Islam is a religion of peace, right? That is the message that’s been brainwashed into Americans. I never bought it and I am pretty sure the non-liberal Americans never bought it either. Everyone is just too Politically Correct to say anything. Wouldn’t want to insult your liberal friends now, would you? Too afraid of offending the Muslim people?

Acctually…. 
There are a “lot” of people who agree with you.
They tend to speak against “all” muslims, regardless of who they are as individuals. 

You see, the media makes it seem like it’s bad to be a conservative and that conservatives are in the minority.

In theory, being conservative isn’t bad, if you’re striving to conserve good things… but that’s not always the case.

They attempt to paint Christianity as a moronic cult.

Actually, a lot of Christians do seem like mindless cultists in their following of the word of groups like focus on the family and other “hate” groups. 

Also, how are you not doing what you accuse them of??

Want to be judged as a human being and an individual for “your” actions and not be presumed to be, well, just like the Norwegian, white, Christian terrorist? How ‘bout you extend the same curtsy to others around you, regardless of their colour or creed. 

They attempt to make white conservatives look like racists.

Maybe, but you know what, all the racists I’ve ran into in my lifetime were white, Christian and conservative. 

‘Course,… that’s hardly science, but… There is a trend.

When in actuality, all conservatives want is to protect our country, freedom and constitution.

Two words: Patriot act.

I was going to say, lets see these groups come protest in NYC on 9/11…but sadly, I don’t think anyone would have the courage to stand up to them. 

Again. 
Group.
Singular.

And, you know what…
This is an “extremist” group.
With very few members.
That those muslims that I know and have commented on their existence tends to go “ugh” in response.

I mean, you yelling ‘bout them and using them to judge all muslims is a little bit like if I were to yell about Westboro Baptist Church and start judging all of christianity for the actions of Westboro Baptist Church.

(Source: instagram-simpleuniverse, via stfuislamobigotry)