"There were Africans in Britain before the English were here—that’s the opinion of Peter Fryer, the great historian of the black presence in England. In his history Staying Power, he quotes the existence of an African legion stationed on Hadrian’s Wall in the third century…If we skip forward to James VI’s court in Scotland, we come across a number of black court entertainers…a black knight, and a lady who was famed for her beauty: “A black lady—a skin that shone like soap. In her rich costume she gleamed as bright as a barrel of tar. When she was born the sun had to suffer an eclipse.”"

Reblogging the endnotes of Philippa Gregory’s A Respectable Trade back from myself like a boss.

Now you all know why that post about Brave was annoying me so much. Well, aside from the fact that it takes real people’s feelings so flippantly.

But if you just want to talk historical accuracy? Let’s talk historical accuracy.

(via mumblingsage)

we did exist period pieces we did!!!

(via morningsides)

(via beyondvictoriana)

africaisdonesuffering:

My chances of living longer didn’t improve because I moved to Europe.
When I’m asked what is your origin?  I say I am Racially, Ethnically, Religiously, Politically, Socially, totally 100% unapologetically black African, and black because the world don’t know who we are. The black race has been called all types of names because you can’t define the indefinable. We are God first people no one name is adequate to describe me because I am indefinable.
Born in Africa (Rwanda), and then moved to DR Congo, then Congo, Then Cameroon, then Senegal, Then Thad, Then Kenya etc… I have lived in many countries in Africa. At the age of 15 the day before travelling to Europe I was so excited, first to see my mother in Belgium second to visit Europeans. I will always remember Belgium as the country were I first looked at myself in the mirror and realized I was black, I was shocked by the way black people were treated, and the negative images of African people shown on TV to Europeans people, I felt humiliated. I lived in Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Spain (not for long), England UK, and currently in Scotland UK.
At first I couldn’t understand why the media only showed negative images of Africa, when there are many Europeans living the good life in Africa and have no plans to go back to Europe because they feel at home. They are treated decently like human beings with feelings (heard things are changing).
I studied fashion & design for 4 years, and the last day of my exams. One hour before presenting my work to the judges. My main teacher told me in front of more than 24 students “you are black, and you’ll never succeed in fashion, if I was you I’ll be doing something like plumbing, construction or electricity”, my works were always selected for shows and I couldn’t believe what she said. So I left everything, school, my mother and Belgium for Canada.
Now I know for a fact that those negatives images of Africa are everywhere in the world, so I understood that many Europeans are not intentionally racist they’re just ignorant, and programmed by the media to hate, however it’s not an excuse though we all have a working brain.
There are poor places everywhere in the world. Every minute a child dies in Africa (Africa = 54 countries, so it’s an easy guess) just like everywhere. People die from starvation in Europe too. You have 50% 50% percent of chances of being killed in Brussels, Johannesburg, Mexico city, Paris, London, Edinburg, Mogadishu, Roma etc… Don’t believe the hype. 
submitted by: http://african-will-unite.tumblr.com

africaisdonesuffering:

My chances of living longer didn’t improve because I moved to Europe.

When I’m asked what is your origin?  I say I am Racially, Ethnically, Religiously, Politically, Socially, totally 100% unapologetically black African, and black because the world don’t know who we are. The black race has been called all types of names because you can’t define the indefinable. We are God first people no one name is adequate to describe me because I am indefinable.

Born in Africa (Rwanda), and then moved to DR Congo, then Congo, Then Cameroon, then Senegal, Then Thad, Then Kenya etc… I have lived in many countries in Africa. At the age of 15 the day before travelling to Europe I was so excited, first to see my mother in Belgium second to visit Europeans. I will always remember Belgium as the country were I first looked at myself in the mirror and realized I was black, I was shocked by the way black people were treated, and the negative images of African people shown on TV to Europeans people, I felt humiliated. I lived in Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Spain (not for long), England UK, and currently in Scotland UK.

At first I couldn’t understand why the media only showed negative images of Africa, when there are many Europeans living the good life in Africa and have no plans to go back to Europe because they feel at home. They are treated decently like human beings with feelings (heard things are changing).

I studied fashion & design for 4 years, and the last day of my exams. One hour before presenting my work to the judges. My main teacher told me in front of more than 24 students “you are black, and you’ll never succeed in fashion, if I was you I’ll be doing something like plumbing, construction or electricity”, my works were always selected for shows and I couldn’t believe what she said. So I left everything, school, my mother and Belgium for Canada.

Now I know for a fact that those negatives images of Africa are everywhere in the world, so I understood that many Europeans are not intentionally racist they’re just ignorant, and programmed by the media to hate, however it’s not an excuse though we all have a working brain.

There are poor places everywhere in the world. Every minute a child dies in Africa (Africa = 54 countries, so it’s an easy guess) just like everywhere. People die from starvation in Europe too. You have 50% 50% percent of chances of being killed in Brussels, Johannesburg, Mexico city, Paris, London, Edinburg, Mogadishu, Roma etc… Don’t believe the hype. 

submitted by: http://african-will-unite.tumblr.com

(via monochromaticblack)

blackgirlphresh:

tumblemesoftly:

freexone:

Aaron Douglas (1898-1979) was the Harlem Renaissance artist whose work best exemplified the ‘New Negro’ philosophy. He painted murals for public buildings and produced illustrations and cover designs for many black publications including The Crisis and Opportunity. In 1940 he moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where he founded the Art Department at Fisk University and taught for twenty nine years.

more on douglas here

(Source: gloomy-black-girl-blogging, via lipsredasroses)

rudolove:

The History of Brazilian Capoeira
Capoeira is a martial art that grew from survival. It was created by slaves brought to Brazil from Africa, during the colonial period. People were brought from Angola, Congo and Mozambique, and with them, they brought their cultural traditions.
They hid their martial art and traditions into a form of dance. The African people developed capoeira not only to resist oppression, but also for the survival of their culture and the lifting of their spirits. After slavery, they continued to play capoeira. With no employment, many of them turned to gangs. Quickly capoeira was associated with crime and in 1892 became outlawed in Brazil. If a person was caught for practicing the art, they were punished by cutting the tendons of the back of their feet. A rhythm, called cavalaria, was created as an alarm that warned them of police. People that played capoeira had nicknames to hide their identity from the police. Often they had more than one. Getting a nickname has become a tradition and people gain a nickname usually at a batizado.
Capoeira was against the law for 20 years until 1918. The first capoeira school ever to exist was that of Mestre Bimba. He was given permission to do so in 1937, after he demonstrated the art in front of president Getúlio Varga. Capoeira was finally recognized as a national sport.
There are two main styles of capoeira. Mestre Bimba is recognized as the father of Capoeira Regional. The second main style is capoeira Angola, a slower and lower to the ground game retaining the rituals and traditions of capoeira.
The first school of angola, Centro Esportivo de Capoeira Angola, was established by Mestre Pastinha in 1942. The school, located in Bahia, had a uniform of black pants and yellow shirts (the color of a Mestre’s Patinha’s favorite soccer team, Ypiranga Futebol Clube).
Source: Capoeira Universe

rudolove:

The History of Brazilian Capoeira

Capoeira is a martial art that grew from survival. It was created by slaves brought to Brazil from Africa, during the colonial period. People were brought from Angola, Congo and Mozambique, and with them, they brought their cultural traditions.

They hid their martial art and traditions into a form of dance. The African people developed capoeira not only to resist oppression, but also for the survival of their culture and the lifting of their spirits. After slavery, they continued to play capoeira. With no employment, many of them turned to gangs. Quickly capoeira was associated with crime and in 1892 became outlawed in Brazil. If a person was caught for practicing the art, they were punished by cutting the tendons of the back of their feet. A rhythm, called cavalaria, was created as an alarm that warned them of police. People that played capoeira had nicknames to hide their identity from the police. Often they had more than one. Getting a nickname has become a tradition and people gain a nickname usually at a batizado.

Capoeira was against the law for 20 years until 1918. The first capoeira school ever to exist was that of Mestre Bimba. He was given permission to do so in 1937, after he demonstrated the art in front of president Getúlio Varga. Capoeira was finally recognized as a national sport.

There are two main styles of capoeira. Mestre Bimba is recognized as the father of Capoeira Regional. The second main style is capoeira Angola, a slower and lower to the ground game retaining the rituals and traditions of capoeira.

The first school of angola, Centro Esportivo de Capoeira Angola, was established by Mestre Pastinha in 1942. The school, located in Bahia, had a uniform of black pants and yellow shirts (the color of a Mestre’s Patinha’s favorite soccer team, Ypiranga Futebol Clube).

Source: Capoeira Universe

(via october-eightyeight)