(Source: streetsnapfashion)

fyeahpocredcarpetfashion:

Jay Chou, at the 24th Golden Melody Awards 

I want that jacket.

I would never wear it.

Formal clothing isn’t really my thing.

But yeah,
That jacket.

fyeahpocredcarpetfashion:

Jay Chou, at the 24th Golden Melody Awards 

I want that jacket. I would never wear it. Formal clothing isn’t really my thing. But yeah, That jacket.

deadlybite:

Colorful Hadeko Fashion w/ Tie-Dye & Decora Hair Clips in Harajuku

(via deadlybite)

animelaserdisc:

colorsagain by shawniguana on Flickr.

animelaserdisc:

colorsagain by shawniguana on Flickr.

(via cyberpunkhero)

fifineadore:

Danai GURIRA.

(via fyeahlilbit3point0)

signalrun:

something sexy about gritty tan colors with an almost neon blue highlight.  really basic and i am not a fan of nike or sports shoes but this is nice.

lunalovex:

Outta This World - Outfit Details & Photos @ www.notsostarving.ca

(via )

municipalmisfits:

//BeachLondon//NEED!That is all. 

municipalmisfits:

//BeachLondon//

NEED!
That is all. 

(via wearenoxious)

redbubble:

“frankie” by Rose Besch
t-shirt, hoodie, sticker on redbubble

redbubble:

“frankie” by Rose Besch

t-shirt, hoodie, sticker on redbubble

zuky:

harrietsdaughter:

downlo:

micropolisnyc:

Why aren’t there more minority models in the pages of fashion magazines?
The answers are often disturbing, and speak to a form of racial bigotry found in the fashion centers of New York and London — as well as a deep-rooted aesthetic that equates prestige and elitism with stereotypical whiteness (and thin-ness).
Here are a few highly-revealing quotes from fashion industry employees, from an analysis of the industry by Ashley Mears, a sociologist and former model. Her article is called “Size zero high-end ethnic: Cultural production and the reproduction of culture in fashion modeling,” and was published in 2009. Mears kept the identities of her sources private.
“A lot of black girls have got very wide noses… The rest of her face is flat, therefore, in a flat image, your nose, it broadens in a photograph. It’s already wide, it looks humongous in the photograph. I think that’s, there’s an element of that, a lot of very beautiful black girls are moved out by their noses, some of them.” —H, London Agency Director
“But it’s also really hard to scout a good black girl. Because they have to have the right nose and the right bottom. Most black girls have wide noses and big bottoms so if you can find that right body and that right face, but it’s hard.” —A, NYC Agency Scout
“Okay let’s say Prada. You don’t have a huge amount of black people buying Prada. They can’t afford it. Okay so that’s economics there. So why put a black face? They put a white face, because those are the ones that buy the clothes.” —L, NYC Stylist
“We don’t like using the same model too often, but it’s harder to find ethnic girls. And…well, I don’t want to sound racist, but— well for Asians, it’s hard to find tall girls that will fit the clothes because most of them are very petit. For black girls, I guess—black girls have a harder edge kind of look, like if I’m shooting something really edgy, I’ll use a black girl, it always just depends on the clothes.” —A, NYC Magazine Editor
“Me personally, in my opinion, there really is no good, good, black girl around. The really good, good black girl around are still the same, and are still the one that everybody wants… It’s very difficult to find one. The agency don’t deliver enough choice to make happy the client [sic].” —O, NYC Casting Director

[TW for the article]
White logic is circular logic:

The absence of non-white models is also deeply rooted in a Western relationship with race that aligns ethnic women with a heightened sexuality and accessibility. The editorial fashion world wants to downplay sexuality to the maximum, thus they choose child-bodied, excessively thin women with unique facial structures within the parameters of the white aesthetic; no one in the editorial fashion world wants to consider their choices racist but their desire to only utilise a certain appearance and also dismiss ethnic women for a lack of conformity to that standard reveals the latent racism that is perpetuated without question but with a recognisable degree of disappointment and no sense of responsibility.       


“We would use more black girls if they looked more like white girls…the black girls just look too black. Otherwise we really would use them.”

“It’s not that we’re racist or anything like that, it’s very technical and scientific, it has to do with photography and economics and molecular structures and it’s hard to find Black girls who are white girls.”

zuky:

harrietsdaughter:

downlo:

micropolisnyc:

Why aren’t there more minority models in the pages of fashion magazines?

The answers are often disturbing, and speak to a form of racial bigotry found in the fashion centers of New York and London — as well as a deep-rooted aesthetic that equates prestige and elitism with stereotypical whiteness (and thin-ness).

Here are a few highly-revealing quotes from fashion industry employees, from an analysis of the industry by Ashley Mears, a sociologist and former model. Her article is called “Size zero high-end ethnic: Cultural production and the reproduction of culture in fashion modeling,” and was published in 2009. Mears kept the identities of her sources private.

A lot of black girls have got very wide noses… The rest of her face is flat, therefore, in a flat image, your nose, it broadens in a photograph. It’s already wide, it looks humongous in the photograph. I think that’s, there’s an element of that, a lot of very beautiful black girls are moved out by their noses, some of them.” —H, London Agency Director

“But it’s also really hard to scout a good black girl. Because they have to have the right nose and the right bottom. Most black girls have wide noses and big bottoms so if you can find that right body and that right face, but it’s hard.” —A, NYC Agency Scout

“Okay let’s say Prada. You don’t have a huge amount of black people buying Prada. They can’t afford it. Okay so that’s economics there. So why put a black face? They put a white face, because those are the ones that buy the clothes.” —L, NYC Stylist

“We don’t like using the same model too often, but it’s harder to find ethnic girls. And…well, I don’t want to sound racist, but— well for Asians, it’s hard to find tall girls that will fit the clothes because most of them are very petit. For black girls, I guess—black girls have a harder edge kind of look, like if I’m shooting something really edgy, I’ll use a black girl, it always just depends on the clothes.” —A, NYC Magazine Editor

Me personally, in my opinion, there really is no good, good, black girl around. The really good, good black girl around are still the same, and are still the one that everybody wants… It’s very difficult to find one. The agency don’t deliver enough choice to make happy the client [sic].” —O, NYC Casting Director

[TW for the article]

White logic is circular logic:

The absence of non-white models is also deeply rooted in a Western relationship with race that aligns ethnic women with a heightened sexuality and accessibility. The editorial fashion world wants to downplay sexuality to the maximum, thus they choose child-bodied, excessively thin women with unique facial structures within the parameters of the white aesthetic; no one in the editorial fashion world wants to consider their choices racist but their desire to only utilise a certain appearance and also dismiss ethnic women for a lack of conformity to that standard reveals the latent racism that is perpetuated without question but with a recognisable degree of disappointment and no sense of responsibility.       

“We would use more black girls if they looked more like white girls…the black girls just look too black. Otherwise we really would use them.”

“It’s not that we’re racist or anything like that, it’s very technical and scientific, it has to do with photography and economics and molecular structures and it’s hard to find Black girls who are white girls.”

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

zambiunicorn:

galaxxxy NEW SHOW ROOM!!!

What a beautiful

(via junkalicious)

(Source: azealiabanksinfo)

mothernaturenetwork:

 Spray-on clothes unveiled on chemistry lab catwalk 
As the fashion pack leave London for Milan, one designer and a professor of particle technology unveiled their own unique collection made in one afternoon with spray-on fabric. The pair, Manel Torres and Paul Luckham, are perfecting a fabric that can be sprayed onto skin and other surfaces to make clothes, medical bandages and even upholstery.
 
Torres, a visiting academic at Imperial College London, approached Luckham, an Imperial College professor of particle technology, to help him realize his dream of a spray-on garment that can be taken off, washed and worn again.
 
“Couture these days is almost dying,” Torres said. “I think here we have a good way of creating instant clothing — that is not very expensive.”
 
Torres demonstrated the process in a lab at Imperial College, spraying a T-shirt onto a model in a matter of minutes. An experience the model described as “nice, actually.”
 
“It’s like second skin,” she said.
 
The system uses short fibers, such as wool, linen or acrylic, mixed with polymers to bind them together. A solvent which evaporates on contact with a surface allows the fibers to be sprayed out of can as a liquid. The spray can be applied using an aerosol can or high pressure spray gun and the texture can be varied by changing the fibers and the numbers of layers of spray. The whole process also allows the material to be recycled.
 
“The beauty about this material is that…I will tear it into parts and I will dissolve it again with the same solvent and I will spray some of it in Rome in two days time,” Torres said.
 
Fashion is just one use of the technology and the pair have set up a company to explore other applications, such as medical patches and bandages, hygiene wipes, air fresheners and upholstery for furniture and cars. Luckham says the technology could see a change to the way we think about using fabric — for example a sterile duster could be sprayed onto a surface which needs to be cleaned.
 
“The advantage of having it in an aerosol can is that once the material is inside nothing can get in and so no germs can get inside,” he said.
 
The material can be hand-washed and Torres says more work is needed to ensure it can withstand a washing machine.

mothernaturenetwork:

Spray-on clothes unveiled on chemistry lab catwalk

As the fashion pack leave London for Milan, one designer and a professor of particle technology unveiled their own unique collection made in one afternoon with spray-on fabric. The pair, Manel Torres and Paul Luckham, are perfecting a fabric that can be sprayed onto skin and other surfaces to make clothes, medical bandages and even upholstery.
 
Torres, a visiting academic at Imperial College London, approached Luckham, an Imperial College professor of particle technology, to help him realize his dream of a spray-on garment that can be taken off, washed and worn again.
 
“Couture these days is almost dying,” Torres said. “I think here we have a good way of creating instant clothing — that is not very expensive.”
 
Torres demonstrated the process in a lab at Imperial College, spraying a T-shirt onto a model in a matter of minutes. An experience the model described as “nice, actually.”
 
“It’s like second skin,” she said.
 
The system uses short fibers, such as wool, linen or acrylic, mixed with polymers to bind them together. A solvent which evaporates on contact with a surface allows the fibers to be sprayed out of can as a liquid. The spray can be applied using an aerosol can or high pressure spray gun and the texture can be varied by changing the fibers and the numbers of layers of spray. The whole process also allows the material to be recycled.
 
“The beauty about this material is that…I will tear it into parts and I will dissolve it again with the same solvent and I will spray some of it in Rome in two days time,” Torres said.
 
Fashion is just one use of the technology and the pair have set up a company to explore other applications, such as medical patches and bandages, hygiene wipes, air fresheners and upholstery for furniture and cars. Luckham says the technology could see a change to the way we think about using fabric — for example a sterile duster could be sprayed onto a surface which needs to be cleaned.
 
“The advantage of having it in an aerosol can is that once the material is inside nothing can get in and so no germs can get inside,” he said.
 
The material can be hand-washed and Torres says more work is needed to ensure it can withstand a washing machine.

(via queensoucouyant)