blank-spots:

Printing out stencils and look at this one!
Swoon.

blank-spots:

Printing out stencils and look at this one!

Swoon.

(Source: sad-guts, via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

seriouslyamerica:

[Image: Tweet from user _Capitalism_ reading: “I am capitalism and I exploit women daily with their own fragmented self image, buy some shoes, be a new woman.”]

seriouslyamerica:

[Image: Tweet from user _Capitalism_ reading: “I am capitalism and I exploit women daily with their own fragmented self image, buy some shoes, be a new woman.”]

"

Doublespeak has the power to warp conceptual thinking and it provides a woman with the wiggle-room she needs to serve her own power. Maneuverings of this type are how a woman can grab the portfolio of entitlements that is most attractive to her on any given day- and resist scrutiny as she does so. The list of doublespeak goes on and on and on. Whereby ‘misogynist’ means ‘male who criticizes any woman’. ‘Blaming the victim’ means ‘women aren’t responsible for what they do’. ‘No means no’ means ‘I want the man to take the heat if I have second thoughts after we have sex’. ‘Male-dominated world’ or ‘patriarchy’ or ‘oppression of women’ all mean ‘multi-purpose scapegoat’. ‘I like you as a friend’ means ‘I think you’re a chump’. ‘You can trust me’ means ‘I’ll tell your secrets to everyone at the nail-salon the first chance I get’.

Doublespeak is meant to confuse us so that when the time comes, we will solemnly decide to act against our own interests for something ‘greater’ than ourselves: benefitting women. Doublespeak will trick a man into abusing himself and other men- for the sole purpose of proving to a woman how ‘masculine’ he is. And since a woman believes her own doublespeak propaganda is truth, she can scream and point fingers when things don’t turn-out the way she wanted. She’ll claim the man is to blame because he refuses to ‘listen’ and ‘communicate’(!)

"

The Nice Guy

This makes me feel physically ill.

(via darkthoughtsbrightdays)

This is double-plus ungood.

fyeahafrica:

Yvonne Vera (September 19, 1964 - April 7, 2005) was an award-winning author from Zimbabwe. Her novels are known for their poetic prose, difficult subject-matter, and their strong women characters, and are firmly rooted in Zimbabwe’s difficult past. For these reasons, she has been widely studied and appreciated by those studying postcolonial African literature.
In 2005, Vera passed away from AIDS-related meningitis, in Toronto, Canada.

fyeahafrica:

Yvonne Vera (September 19, 1964 - April 7, 2005) was an award-winning author from Zimbabwe. Her novels are known for their poetic prose, difficult subject-matter, and their strong women characters, and are firmly rooted in Zimbabwe’s difficult past. For these reasons, she has been widely studied and appreciated by those studying postcolonial African literature.

In 2005, Vera passed away from AIDS-related meningitis, in Toronto, Canada.

(Source: )

The Idealized Character in Disability Narratives: Why it Matters, and Why We Should Dismantle It

fromonesurvivortoanother:

[trigger warning: discussion of rape, rape culture, and court trials. Discussion of ableism and disability as seen by others, with some examples of ableist language. Brief mention of colonialism and American Indian genocide.]

=================================

(Read more break for length)

Read More

(Source: fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

shoshanainlove:

Men’s Rights Activism

BUT WHAT ABOUT TEH MENZ??!!!!11/??

shoshanainlove:

Men’s Rights Activism

BUT WHAT ABOUT TEH MENZ??!!!!11/??

(Source: queervashti)

"A Letter from Huey Newton...about the Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements"

darkjez:

I felt this text needed to be featured in it’s entirety. Please read! I know it’s long but do it or me? Pwease? …It’s really touching a deep place in my heart. 
     **Emphasis & Italicization Mine

HUEY P. NEWTON—

During the past few years strong movements have developed among women and among homosexuals seeking their liberation. There has been some uncertainty about how to relate to these movements.

Whatever your personal opinions and your insecurities about homosexuality and the various liberation movements among homosexuals and women (and I speak of the homosexuals and women as oppressed groups), we should try to unite with them in a revolutionary fashion. I say “whatever your insecurities are” because as we very well know, sometimes our first instinct is to want to hit a homosexual in the mouth, and want a woman to be quiet. We want to hit a homosexual in the mouth because we are afraid that we might be homosexual; and we want to hit the women or shut her up because we are afraid that she might castrate us, or take the nuts that we might not have to start with.

We must gain security in ourselves and therefore have respect and feelings for all oppressed people. We must not use the racist attitude that the White racists use against our people because they are Black and poor. Many times the poorest White person is the most racist because he is afraid that he might lose something, or discover something that he does not have. So you’re some kind of a threat to him. This kind of psychology is in operation when we view oppressed people and we are angry with them because of their particular kind of behavior, or their particular kind of deviation from the established norm.

Remember, we have not established a revolutionary value system; we are only in the process of establishing it. I do not remember our ever constituting any value that said that a revolutionary must say offensive things towards homosexuals, or that a revolutionary should make sure that women do not speak out about their own particular kind of oppression. As a matter of fact, it is just the opposite: we say that we recognize the women’s right to be free. We have not said much about the homosexual at all, but we must relate to the homosexual movement because it is a real thing. And I know through reading, and through my life experience and observations that homosexuals are not given freedom and liberty by anyone in the society. They might be the most oppressed people in the society.

And what made them homosexual? Perhaps it’s a phenomenon that I don’t understand entirely. Some people say that it is the decadence of capitalism. I don’t know if that is the case; I rather doubt it. But whatever the case is, we know that homosexuality is a fact that exists, and we must understand it in its purest form: that is, a person should have the freedom to use his body in whatever way he wants.

That is not endorsing things in homosexuality that we wouldn’t view as revolutionary. But there is nothing to say that a homosexual cannot also be a revolutionary. And maybe I’m now injecting some of my prejudice by saying that “even a homosexual can be a revolutionary.” Quite the contrary, maybe a homosexual could be the most revolutionary.

When we have revolutionary conferences, rallies, and demonstrations, there should be full participation of the gay liberation movement and the women’s liberation movement. Some groups might be more revolutionary than others. We should not use the actions of a few to say that they are all reactionary or counterrevolutionary, because they are not.

We should deal with the factions just as we deal with any other group or party that claims to be revolutionary. We should try to judge, somehow, whether they are operating in a sincere revolutionary fashion and from a really oppressed situation. (And we will grant that if they are women they are probably oppressed.) If they do things that are unrevolutionary or counterrevolutionary, then criticize that action. If we feel that the group in spirit means to be revolutionary in practice, but they make mistakes in interpretation of the revolutionary philosophy, or they do not understand the dialectics of the social forces in operation, we should criticize that and not criticize them because they are women trying to be free. And the same is true for homosexuals. We should never say a whole movement is dishonest when in fact they are trying to be honest. They are just making honest mistakes. Friends are allowed to make mistakes. The enemy is not allowed to make mistakes because his whole existence is a mistake, and we suffer from it. But the women’s liberation front and gay liberation front are our friends, they are our potential allies, and we need as many allies as possible.

We should be willing to discuss the insecurities that many people have about homosexuality. When I say “insecurities,” I mean the fear that they are some kind of threat to our manhood. I can understand this fear. Because of the long conditioning process which builds insecurity in the American male, homosexuality might produce certain hang-ups in us. I have hang-ups myself about male homosexuality. But on the other hand, I have no hang-up about female homosexuality. And that is a phenomenon in itself. I think it is probably because male homosexuality is a threat to me and female homosexuality is not.

We should be careful about using those terms that might turn our friends off. The terms “faggot” and “punk” should be deleted from our vocabulary, and especially we should not attach names normally designed for homosexuals to men who are enemies of the people, such as Nixon or Mitchell. Homosexuals are not enemies of the people.

We should try to form a working coalition with the gay liberation and women’s liberation groups. We must always handle social forces in the most appropriate manner

"I mean, honestly? Birth control is amazing. It makes my periods wonderfully lighter than my normal heavy flow, and if it keeps me childless to boot? Hell yeah. And so what if a newly conceptualized zygote doesn’t implant? Why is a not-even-a-fetus-yet-egg more important than my choices? Nothing inside my body gets to stay there without my consent. Not a penis, not a finger, not a dildo, not a fetus. The end!"

dominoblox in response to this hilarious anti-abortion/anti-contraception post. (via in-her-hips-theres-revolutions)

Amanda, you are my best friend.

(via sanityscraps)

8DDDD yaaaaay I’m loved~

(via dominoblox)

(Source: sluteverxxx, via seriouslyamerica)

feministbecky:

devawning:

Get it?

Hehehehehehehe

feministbecky:

devawning:

Get it?

Hehehehehehehe

(via seriouslyamerica)

(Source: inactivegrokeseverywhere)

"More of my 2 and half cents" (it’s worth about that much)

feministdisney:

feminismfreedomfighters:

 Do you really want to be a white person in Africa—with all the stereotypes and discrimination that goes with it? Personally, no.

FFF, I’m not going to disagree with everything you say, because for the most part you presented it rationally even if I do disagree with it, and I’m too tired from watching kids all day, quite frankly, to do a point by point.

  I’ll only say that I do know many white people who have gone to (live in, as well as visit) Africa, and yes, I absolutely would be fine being “a white person in Africa” because white privilege exists there too.   But that comes back to what I’ve been trying to say: is that the way people are treated is not equal, even in the case of racism.   Even in areas that are predominantly people of color, white privilege often still exists, which is why our experiences as white people in these places are never quite the same.    It’s possible, of course, that some of the privilege people I know experienced was more national/class related because they were coming from America and Germany and going to Africa.  

More than one family I know enjoyed living in different African countries because they experienced a whole LOT of privilege/benefits there.    They had multiple servants, gigantic houses, several cars, etc.  It was not uncomfortable on the whole.  There’s obviously more to it than that, good and bad experiences (a lot of them needed guards, easy as they were to afford), but you don’t know what you’re talking about if you think all white people have a horrible time when they go to Africa, that just isn’t the case.     My own (white) host family lived there for many years and had considered staying there permanently.   

Irish people are of tremendous sentimental value, but that is also a stereotype, and quite an irritating one at that. And in terms of whiteness, we’re seen as the white version of the old world view of blacks.

(tremendous sentimental value as a stereotype…what does that mean??)   If it was still the 1900 I’d agree Irish are seen in some such way, but I think w can safely say that the Irish are no longer seen as a “less-than-white” white?   (Also, “white version of the old world view of blacks”: do you really think Irish people are treated now as the old world treated blacks?   I don’t understand what  you actually mean to say but I doubt that was it)

That’s really not the way we’re seen in America or in Europe anymore.  And again, I don’t think these experiences should be rendered invisible, but why is there so much insistence in propping them up against the struggles of people of color?   We are really not marginalized, our voices are really not being oppressed when it comes to white struggles.   If anything our culture is 100 times more likely to listen to our plights than to the plights of POC.

So yes, as a white person I’m not going to be that patronizing jerk who simpers like I know exactly what it’s like to live in a culture functioning on white hegemony. I don’t. But I come close. Much closer than many other intellectual elites. And my response, limited as it is by my racial niche, is to avoid becoming the monster you’re fighting against.

Hands down. What I’m saying is that calling me a racist cracker has the same denial of individual characteristics as old imperialism. It’s a ploy used to dehumanize others, in power or not, and it works.

Okay, I’d agree that that was the intended affect in how it was being used when that person said it, and that is wrong.

feministblackboard:

Trigger warning: abuse and rape descriptions.
A few weeks ago my mom stapled pages of a story in one of her women’s magazines together and handed it to me. She gave it to me pretty much with the tag lines “for your feminist blog” and “something new to consider.” Indeed it was; she knows me well.
The story is titled “I was forced to be pregnant.” With a title like that, reading it was actually not on the top of my to read list. I thought it was about women not exercising their right to choice. I was very, very wrong on that one.
Have you ever heard of Reproductive coercion? It is a term that was quite recently coined by the advocates against domestic violence to describe a certain type of abuse some women face. It occurs when a man pressures their partner to have kids and/or impregnates them against their will. Reproductive coercion comes in three different types:1. Emotional pressure that turns into verbal and physical abuse.2. Sabotaging birth control3. Marital rapeOver 75% of women 19-49 who reported once experiencing domestic violence also endured some type of reproductive control by men. It’s all about control and domination over a woman’s body.
The first story in the magazine is about a woman who got married around 36 years of age. After a few months of dating her boyfriend talked excitedly about having children. After he proposed he began calling her “The Babymaker.” She then confided with him that one of her fallopian tubes was blocked. He in return insisted she see a fertility doctor. She recounts, “I had finally met a great guy who was eager to start a family with me. What woman wouldn’t fall for that?” Soon after her honeymoon he persisted on in an obsessive manner, but his efforts had to be temporarily halted as she had to get emergency back surgery. Alas, 6 months into recovery he was back to pressuring her again. She was in much pain at the time due to her back, but she agreed to In Vitro Fertilization. She then became pregnant, but soon miscarried. In response, her husband grabbed her by the neck, choking her. He apologized, blaming his outburst on his grief and had her sign up for another round of IVF. And then a third round. She tried to put him off with the excuse that she needed to weigh more before she could take treatments, her husband forced her to get on the scale often and filled the fridge with fattening foods. “It hurt that all I was good for was getting pregnant.” She recounts. At the end, he screamed at her, threatening to replace her with a maid if she couldn’t get pregnant and she told him she no longer wanted to have his child. He destroyed bedroom furniture, pushed her down the stairs and threatened her with a gun. She fled to a domestic violence shelter.
The second story was about a woman who faced marital rape. This woman was 40, had a then boyfriend and two children from a previous marriage. After telling her boyfriend she did not want any more children, her boyfriend refused to wear a condom and began to rape her.  She then became pregnant with her third child. Birth control was never an option for her because she couldn’t hide pills anywhere for he went through all of her belongings. Three months after giving birth, he raped her again, impregnating her with twins. She lost the twins in a physical fight with him, but soon became pregnant again. During her recovery she begged her obstetrician to remove her ovaries and devise a lie to tell him; that she had cancer. After a decade of sexual abuse and violence she was able to get a job that kept her out of the house and often times traveling.
One in four callers to the National Domestic Abuse hotline said that their partners had tried to force them to become pregnant. Why? As one woman stated, “Its like he wants to own me from the inside out.”  Having a baby is the perfect tie that binds. These type of abusers want to create a circumstance in which their partner is dependent on him.
WHAT’S THAT HAVE TO DO WITH PLANNED PARENTHOOD?
Many voters never consider how defunding these clinics could hurt victims of domestic violence who turn to them for counseling as well as pregnancy prevention. Abused women will turn to health care providers long before they will turn to domestic abuse hotlines and organizations. Many women in abusive relationships rely on life saving, affordable care programs such as Title X. It is critical that such places are open and operation when women and children need them so desperately.

feministblackboard:

Trigger warning: abuse and rape descriptions.

A few weeks ago my mom stapled pages of a story in one of her women’s magazines together and handed it to me. She gave it to me pretty much with the tag lines “for your feminist blog” and “something new to consider.” Indeed it was; she knows me well.

The story is titled “I was forced to be pregnant.” With a title like that, reading it was actually not on the top of my to read list. I thought it was about women not exercising their right to choice. I was very, very wrong on that one.

Have you ever heard of Reproductive coercion? It is a term that was quite recently coined by the advocates against domestic violence to describe a certain type of abuse some women face. It occurs when a man pressures their partner to have kids and/or impregnates them against their will. Reproductive coercion comes in three different types:
1. Emotional pressure that turns into verbal and physical abuse.
2. Sabotaging birth control
3. Marital rape
Over 75% of women 19-49 who reported once experiencing domestic violence also endured some type of reproductive control by men. It’s all about control and domination over a woman’s body.

The first story in the magazine is about a woman who got married around 36 years of age. After a few months of dating her boyfriend talked excitedly about having children. After he proposed he began calling her “The Babymaker.” She then confided with him that one of her fallopian tubes was blocked. He in return insisted she see a fertility doctor. She recounts, “I had finally met a great guy who was eager to start a family with me. What woman wouldn’t fall for that?” Soon after her honeymoon he persisted on in an obsessive manner, but his efforts had to be temporarily halted as she had to get emergency back surgery. Alas, 6 months into recovery he was back to pressuring her again. She was in much pain at the time due to her back, but she agreed to In Vitro Fertilization. She then became pregnant, but soon miscarried. In response, her husband grabbed her by the neck, choking her. He apologized, blaming his outburst on his grief and had her sign up for another round of IVF. And then a third round. She tried to put him off with the excuse that she needed to weigh more before she could take treatments, her husband forced her to get on the scale often and filled the fridge with fattening foods. “It hurt that all I was good for was getting pregnant.” She recounts. At the end, he screamed at her, threatening to replace her with a maid if she couldn’t get pregnant and she told him she no longer wanted to have his child. He destroyed bedroom furniture, pushed her down the stairs and threatened her with a gun. She fled to a domestic violence shelter.

The second story was about a woman who faced marital rape. This woman was 40, had a then boyfriend and two children from a previous marriage. After telling her boyfriend she did not want any more children, her boyfriend refused to wear a condom and began to rape her.  She then became pregnant with her third child. Birth control was never an option for her because she couldn’t hide pills anywhere for he went through all of her belongings. Three months after giving birth, he raped her again, impregnating her with twins. She lost the twins in a physical fight with him, but soon became pregnant again. During her recovery she begged her obstetrician to remove her ovaries and devise a lie to tell him; that she had cancer. After a decade of sexual abuse and violence she was able to get a job that kept her out of the house and often times traveling.

One in four callers to the National Domestic Abuse hotline said that their partners had tried to force them to become pregnant. Why? As one woman stated, “Its like he wants to own me from the inside out.”  Having a baby is the perfect tie that binds. These type of abusers want to create a circumstance in which their partner is dependent on him.

WHAT’S THAT HAVE TO DO WITH PLANNED PARENTHOOD?

Many voters never consider how defunding these clinics could hurt victims of domestic violence who turn to them for counseling as well as pregnancy prevention. Abused women will turn to health care providers long before they will turn to domestic abuse hotlines and organizations. Many women in abusive relationships rely on life saving, affordable care programs such as Title X. It is critical that such places are open and operation when women and children need them so desperately.

(Source: feminist-blackboard, via propaganda-for-life)

(via cuntygrrl-deactivated20111201-d)

takealookatyourlife:

And this is why so many people deny being feminists. 

takealookatyourlife:

And this is why so many people deny being feminists. 

(Source: takealookatyourlife, via stfueverything)