Fired Over Facebook Response

inkplink:

girljanitor:

puabie:

commanderbishoujo:

deliciouskaek:

girljanitor:

alexandraerin:

naturalistasforever:

phoenixfhyre:

Jesus.
Even when I think I can, I can’t.

“A black female meteorologist has been fired from the ABC affiliate in Shreveport, La., she told Journal-isms, because she responded to a racial remark posted by a viewer on the station’s Facebook page.

KTBS-TV’s action against Rhonda Lee followed a previous response by Lee to a viewer who questioned whether she should wear her short Afro, suggesting she put on a wig or grow more hair.”

Blatant racism. I hope she sues the drawls off of them.

The patience and professionalism of this woman in dealing with blatant racists should have merited a raise.

This is what she was fired for responding to:

On Oct. 1, a viewer identified as Emmitt Vascocu wrote, “the black lady that does the news is a very nice lady.the only thing is she needs to wear a wig or grow some more hair. im not sure if she is a cancer patient. but still its not something myself that i think looks good on tv. what about letting someone a male have waist long hair do the news.what about that (cq).”

Lee replied the same day, “Hello Emmitt—I am the ‘black lady’ to which you are referring. I’m sorry you don’t like my ethnic hair. And no I don’t have cancer. I’m a non-smoking, 5’3, 121 lbs, 25 mile a week running, 37.5 year old woman, and I’m in perfectly healthy physical condition.

“I am very proud of my African-American ancestry which includes my hair. For your edification: traditionally our hair doesn’t grow downward. It grows upward. Many Black women use strong straightening agents in order to achieve a more European grade of hair and that is their choice. However in my case I don’t find it necessary. I’m very proud of who I am and the standard of beauty I display. Women come in all shapes, sizes, nationalities, and levels of beauty. Showing little girls that being comfortable in the skin and HAIR God gave me is my contribution to society. Little girls (and boys for that matter) need to see that what you look like isn’t a reason to not achieve their goals.

“Conforming to one standard isn’t what being American is about and I hope you can embrace that.

Thank you for your comment and have a great weekend and thank for watching.

oh

OH

yea, she shouldn’t be fired over that response. they make it sound like she cussed somebody out.

heh, to white folks that is cussing out. you know a black woman is automatically hostile as long as she has the temerity to check a white person, no matter what her actual tone or words are

commanderbishoujo: I’d appreciate it if you didn’t generalize another race. I agree with what I think you were trying to get across, but tossing out a couple of snide remarks in the middle of it won’t fly. Personally I suggest that instead of attacking whites, you attack actual racists. You know, the bad guys. 

commanderbishoujo says “no matter what white people think Black women are hostile”

white person: why are you Black women so hostile??????

LIKE IS ANYONE ELSE SEEING WHAT I SEE PLEASE?

that’s exactly what i’m seeing.

because “hostile” and “disagreeable” always mean “reacting to racist oppressive bullshit in any manner that is not a predetermined level of politeness that you can never achieve”.

:|

(Source: phloeticexpressions, via deliverysuspended-deactivated20)

briennae8:

The Beautiful Janelle Monae .

briennae8:

The Beautiful Janelle Monae .

(via wa55up)

naturalbelle:

Tutorial | Frohawk (by FusionofCultures)

(via jhenne-bean)

popca:

yeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!

popca:

yeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!

(via chauvinistsushi)

jasminejgreen:

So, three years ago my hair was a rat tailed, over processed ruin. One utterly miserable day and I grabbed a pair of scissors and took it out on my hair, leaving me with a mop that was was up by my ears and an absolute mess.
Since then, I’ve worn extensions and babied the shit out it to try.
So for the first time in a very long time, this is ALL my own hair! Not a fake piece of hair in sight.
So for goodness sakes, never let me go near my hair with a pair of scissors again!!

jasminejgreen:

So, three years ago my hair was a rat tailed, over processed ruin. One utterly miserable day and I grabbed a pair of scissors and took it out on my hair, leaving me with a mop that was was up by my ears and an absolute mess.

Since then, I’ve worn extensions and babied the shit out it to try.

So for the first time in a very long time, this is ALL my own hair! Not a fake piece of hair in sight.

So for goodness sakes, never let me go near my hair with a pair of scissors again!!

roropcoldchain:

curlynugrowth:

safireblew:

indiigo amora.
poet. foto documentarian. aspiring cellist.

gotta love big hair! 

Are those dreads, because damn. #HairEnvy

roropcoldchain:

curlynugrowth:

safireblew:

indiigo amora.

poet. foto documentarian. aspiring cellist.

gotta love big hair! 

Are those dreads, because damn. #HairEnvy

jasminejgreen:

I am envious of America’s artificial, sugary goodness <3

jasminejgreen:

I am envious of America’s artificial, sugary goodness <3

vogueweekend:

Backstage at Marc Jacobs Fall 2012, New York


THE SAGA BEGINS

vogueweekend:

Backstage at Marc Jacobs Fall 2012, New York

THE SAGA BEGINS

(via allofthestuffandthings)

pompadoursandpincurls:

delatierraa:

New Black Barbies Get it Half Right
Mattel just unveiled its newest collection of Barbies: the So in Style (S.I.S.) collection. Created by an African-American designer, the dolls are meant to be more culturally relevant to young multi-ethnic girls in their fashions, facial features and hairstyles with inspiring hobbies.
“I want them to be examples to real girls,” says Mattel designer Stacey McBride-Irby.
The dolls come in pairs with a big and little sister to encourage mentoring relationships. While we applaud the cute dolls – Grace and Courtney, Kara and Kiana and Trichelle and Janessa – most still look like a darker shade of Barbie. Only one of the three adult dolls, Kara, has natural hair, while the other two sport long, stick-straight ‘dos. And out of the three little sisters, only one has a textured style – afro puffs – while the rest have straighter styles.
Barbie has come along way since she first was conceived 50 years ago by Ruth Handler, who founded Mattel in 1944 with husband, Elliot and Harold “Matt” Matson. Handler was bucking a post-World War II trend of paper dolls and baby dolls by creating a fashion doll, whcih she named after her daughter, Barbara.
The early Barbie’s measurements were unattainable. In 1989, a Barbie Liberation Organization was formed by a group of activists who objected to Barbie’s unrealistic figure and her superficial consumerism.
And Barbie definitely lacked ethnicity, even when they were meant to be black or Hispanic. The company simply took the Barbie mold and hair and gave the doll darker skin.
The new dolls are a definite improvement over Mattel’s previous attempts. But they still fall slightly short, falling back on what is more socially acceptable and reinforcing old standards of beauty that have changed dramatically as our society becomes more multicultural.
The dolls have gotten mixed reviews from the African-American community.
“The S.I.S. dolls are just another example of how America loves to see American-Americans: as white as possible,” says About-face.com. “Of course many black women do have hair like this, but most don’t grow it that way naturally. There are six different dolls – why not six different kinds of hair? To me, this lack of representation just reaffirms the notion that ‘nappy’ or ‘kinky’ hair is bad, while promoting long, sleek hair as the most (or only) beautiful option.”
Blogger Raven Hill writes on Jezebel.com: “Hair can be a complicated subject for black women, and it would be sad for any little girl to feel as if her texture wasn’t desirable or represented.”

In the meantime, read how womyn of color are combatting the issue by taking matters into their own hands and giving these straight haired barbies natural hair makeovers! I think I’m gonna make one!


“The S.I.S. dolls are just another example of how America loves to see American-Americans: as white as possible.”

pompadoursandpincurls:

delatierraa:

New Black Barbies Get it Half Right

Mattel just unveiled its newest collection of Barbies: the So in Style (S.I.S.) collection. Created by an African-American designer, the dolls are meant to be more culturally relevant to young multi-ethnic girls in their fashions, facial features and hairstyles with inspiring hobbies.

“I want them to be examples to real girls,” says Mattel designer Stacey McBride-Irby.

The dolls come in pairs with a big and little sister to encourage mentoring relationships. While we applaud the cute dolls – Grace and Courtney, Kara and Kiana and Trichelle and Janessa – most still look like a darker shade of Barbie. Only one of the three adult dolls, Kara, has natural hair, while the other two sport long, stick-straight ‘dos. And out of the three little sisters, only one has a textured style – afro puffs – while the rest have straighter styles.

Barbie has come along way since she first was conceived 50 years ago by Ruth Handler, who founded Mattel in 1944 with husband, Elliot and Harold “Matt” Matson. Handler was bucking a post-World War II trend of paper dolls and baby dolls by creating a fashion doll, whcih she named after her daughter, Barbara.

The early Barbie’s measurements were unattainable. In 1989, a Barbie Liberation Organization was formed by a group of activists who objected to Barbie’s unrealistic figure and her superficial consumerism.

And Barbie definitely lacked ethnicity, even when they were meant to be black or Hispanic. The company simply took the Barbie mold and hair and gave the doll darker skin.

The new dolls are a definite improvement over Mattel’s previous attempts. But they still fall slightly short, falling back on what is more socially acceptable and reinforcing old standards of beauty that have changed dramatically as our society becomes more multicultural.

The dolls have gotten mixed reviews from the African-American community.

“The S.I.S. dolls are just another example of how America loves to see American-Americans: as white as possible,” says About-face.com. “Of course many black women do have hair like this, but most don’t grow it that way naturally. There are six different dolls – why not six different kinds of hair? To me, this lack of representation just reaffirms the notion that ‘nappy’ or ‘kinky’ hair is bad, while promoting long, sleek hair as the most (or only) beautiful option.”

Blogger Raven Hill writes on Jezebel.com: “Hair can be a complicated subject for black women, and it would be sad for any little girl to feel as if her texture wasn’t desirable or represented.”

In the meantime, read how womyn of color are combatting the issue by taking matters into their own hands and giving these straight haired barbies natural hair makeovers! I think I’m gonna make one!

“The S.I.S. dolls are just another example of how America loves to see American-Americans: as white as possible.”

(Source: afrodeiiity, via tough-titty-deactivated20121030)

(via luiibadass)

(via genderfuckandsecrets)

jhenne-bean:

THE NOISE I JUST MADE.
I made a Black Rapunzel once. With a braid. :|
then someone pointed out that the tower had “interesting coloring” and I was like “wot” and they were like “It looks like a penis.” which I suppose is entirely true tbh.
Anyone reblogging this from me, feel free to delete that last part.

See, the tower being phallic is representative of how she (and women as a whole) are kept prisoner by patriarchal gender roles and views of sexuality.Also, Rapunzel is one of the few &#8220;princesses&#8221; I&#8217;d like to see as a black character. Some of the other options, i.e. Cinderella hit a little bit&#8230; On the dark side, so to speak. 

jhenne-bean:

THE NOISE I JUST MADE.

I made a Black Rapunzel once. With a braid. :|

then someone pointed out that the tower had “interesting coloring” and I was like “wot” and they were like “It looks like a penis.” which I suppose is entirely true tbh.

Anyone reblogging this from me, feel free to delete that last part.

See, the tower being phallic is representative of how she (and women as a whole) are kept prisoner by patriarchal gender roles and views of sexuality.

Also, Rapunzel is one of the few “princesses” I’d like to see as a black character. Some of the other options, i.e. Cinderella hit a little bit… On the dark side, so to speak. 

(Source: thighrabanks)

(via theassbuttqueen)

jhenne-bean:

adventuresofcomicbookgirl:

wicked-grin:

I’M GONNA KILL SOMETHING.

yeah you can go die in a fire DC

jhenne-bean:

adventuresofcomicbookgirl:

wicked-grin:

I’M GONNA KILL SOMETHING.

yeah you can go die in a fire DC

siesindmeintodeswunsch:

i dressed up for a while.

siesindmeintodeswunsch:

i dressed up for a while.