India gang rape victim's father: I want the world to know my daughter's name is Jyoti Singh Pandey

(Source: angryasiangirlsunited)

When hundreds of women descended on Nagpur district court armed with knives, stones and chilli powder, within minutes the man who raped them lay dead.

eclecticpurple:

ohfuckitszombieoprah:

juicy-r:

At 3pm on August 13 2004, Akku Yadav was lynched by a mob of around 200 women from Kasturba Nagar. It took them 15 minutes to hack to death the man they say raped them with impunity for more than a decade. Chilli powder was thrown in his face and stones hurled. As he flailed and fought, one of his alleged victims hacked off his penis with a vegetable knife. A further 70 stab wounds were left on his body. The incident was made all the more extraordinary by its setting. Yadav was murdered not in the dark alleys of the slum, but on the shiny white marble floor of Nagpur district court.

Laughed at and abused by the police when they reported being raped by Yadav, the women took the law into their own hands. On the day of Yadav’s hearing, 200 women came to the court armed with vegetable knives and chilli powder. As he walked in, Yadav spotted one of the women he had raped. He called her a prostitute and threatened to repeat the crime against her. The police laughed. She took off her sandal and began to hit him, shouting, “We can’t both live on this Earth together. It’s you or me.”

It was a rallying cry to an incensed mob. Soon, he was being attacked on all sides. Knives were drawn and the two terrified officers guarding him ran away. Within 15 minutes, Yadav was dead on the courthouse floor. But his death has not brought the women peace. Five were immediately arrested, then released following a demonstration across the city. Now every woman living in the slum has claimed responsibility for the murder. They say no one person can take the blame: they have told the police to arrest them all.

“We can’t both live on this Earth together. It’s you or me.”

Damn fucking right.

YES

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

guardian:

Mumbai, India: An Indian wrestler lifts a baby girl at an akhada, a traditional gymnasium Photograph: Rafiq Maqbool/AP

guardian:

Mumbai, India: An Indian wrestler lifts a baby girl at an akhada, a traditional gymnasium Photograph: Rafiq Maqbool/AP

(Source: )

"

He said explaining what had happened, to family in India had been very difficult.

“Savita has a lot of doctors in her family, a lot of medical people, her uncle, her aunt, many people who are in medicine and they are all asking, ’How can this happen in the 21st century, when the medical field is so advanced?’ and ‘Why didn’t they abort her?’”

“So I had to explain the whole thing, about the law there [in Ireland] and how [when] the foetus is live… and they were all just, some people even laughed at me. ‘That’s crazy’ they said.

“And I just had to tell them, that’s the way it is, that unfortunately that’s the country we were in at the time.

“People keep asking me, ’How could they leave the womb open for two days? There is a high risk of infection there’

“A common thing I’m asked: ‘The mother’s life is a bigger life. They knew that they couldn’t save the baby. Why didn’t they look at the bigger life?’

"

- Praveen Halappanavar, husband of Savita, from “We heard Ireland was a good place to have a baby” - Irish Times, 14th November 2012

Do you have an answer, Youth Defence? Any of you crazy anti-choicers out there? Anything at all to say over what your medieval insistence on robbing people of bodily autonomy and dignity is causing?

(via pixiegrace)

I don’t know how many of you have heard of this case, but on the 28th October an Indian dentist living here died of septicaemia because of our archaic abortion laws and lack of clear legislation. 

Our government and anti-choicers love to shout about how it’s such a safe place to give birth, which is bullshit. If something goes wrong, things like this happen. 

RIP Savita.

(via esmeweatherwax)

(via lancrebitch)

"‘While there is this huge celebration of Hindi abroad, in the place of its birth Hindi has been compromised,’ said Mahesh Dhakar. who writes on culture. “Students can hardly write correct Hindi, and their vocabulary is invaded by all kinds of foreign words and internet-supported short forms. Chaste Hindi or Urdu has disappeared,” said Dhakar."

“It’s Hindi Abroad, English at Home.”, Hill Post. (via praxidikai)

Exactly. It’s infuriating. I taught high school students for a while and one of the most baffling things I experienced was their disregard for Urdu. Talking in Urdu was considered a ‘backward’ pursuit among the majority of O and A Level students that I taught, there was also an element of disdain for matriculation students who were seen as “less posh” and more “paindu” (which is Urdu slang for a villager - again, classist discrimination). But this does not entirely stem from a mentality in a society where English is seen as a definite social marker and refiner for the upper class; It is embedded in a colonial history where English was spoken not only as a language but as a symbol of superiority. The White Master spoke English, the Brown Servant could either learn the language and become slightly better than his peers or he could remain ‘ignorant.’ Later on it became evident that the likelihood of a Pakistani gaining employment in the job market had a lot to do with their ability to speak “good” English. 

So today you have schools throughout Asia insisting upon “English medium schools” and brainwashing young people into believing that their native language(s) is something they should not be proud of. The good part about this mania is that quite a few youths are rebelling against Anglophilic pedagogy by actively learning and engaging with others in proper, correct Urdu. Which is amazing and important.

(via mehreenkasana)

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)

the first South Asian LGBTQ hotline has been launched to help gay South Asians/Desi youths and their families.

deafmuslimpunx:

Salaams.

This has already been launched on October 11. Please repost widely to the South Asian/Desi community in your area. Dhanyavad.

————————————————-

Announcing the Launch of DeQH!

a Desi lgbtQ Helpline

On National Coming Out Day, Thursday, October 11th, 2012, a coalition of South Asian lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) organizations and individuals in the U.S. will launch DeQH, the first South Asian LGBTQ national helpline.

DeQH offers free, confidential, culturally sensitive peer support, information and resources by telephone for LGBTQ South Asian individuals, families and friends around the globe. The intent is to provide a safe and supportive ear for callers to share their concerns, questions, struggles or hopes through conversations with trained LGBTQ South Asian Peer Support Volunteers.

Callers can reach the helpline at (908) FOR-DEQH (908-367-3374 8pm-10pm on Thursdays and Sundays, Eastern Standard Time [5-7pm PST].  Days and times will expand over time.

For general information, check out www.deqh.org and contact deqh.info (at) gmail.com.

DeQH is a collaboration of South Asian LGBTQ groups and individuals around the nation including AQUA North Carolina, Hotpot! in Philadelphia, SALGA NYC, Satrang in LA, and Trikone San Francisco. Please contact us if your group is interested in joining our effort, and/or if you are interested in becoming a general volunteer or would like to be trained as a peer support volunteer.

DeQH operates with support from NQAPIA. Trikone is a fiscal sponsor of DeQH.

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista, via queerthanks)

deafmuslimpunx:

Indian author Pankaj Mishra. (Photo: V. Ganesa) (source: The Hindu)
^ I gotta have a copy of this new book.

 The book is about a fascinating period in Asian history, the 19th and early 20th centuries when men and women were formulating a response to that very aggressive presence in their lives: Western colonialism and imperialism. They are fairly obscure figures, not men valorised in history text books such as Gandhi, Nehru or Mao Zedong. Men like Jamal al-Afghani and Liang Qichao and there are reasons why they are not as famous as the men they inspired later. “They are not known much,” Pankaj says, “because they don’t belong to the kind of triumphalist nationalist narratives, both of the West and the East. The histories we are told are nationalist histories and they talk about the emergence of the nation state from Western imperialism and they talk of the generation that led that struggle and the mass movements and then assumed power when the Europeans left. But these were the first generation and because they incarnated so many political ideas and tendencies, they almost seem like, in retrospect, confused or incoherent figures as opposed to the people like Mao Zedong who came later.”
Why the choice of these men to tell the story of Asia’s response to colonialism? Because, sometimes marginal figures tell you more about historical moments and their societies. When one reads about the histories of Egypt or China in the late 19th or early 20th centuries, he says, one keeps coming across references to these men. Both were born in traditional Asian families but were curious about the politics and ideologies of their time and were great travellers. But one never gets to know more. Who exactly are they as persons, politically, intellectually, what was the larger shape and trajectories of their lives? One never got a sense of what their journeys were. But there were connections between them. Liang Qichao admired Tagore who himself had travelled to Cairo to meet one of al-Afghani’s disciples and “suddenly as I read more widely, this world of Asia began to emerge more systematic than before in its response to the West.”

deafmuslimpunx:

Indian author Pankaj Mishra. (Photo: V. Ganesa) (source: The Hindu)

^ I gotta have a copy of this new book.

The book is about a fascinating period in Asian history, the 19th and early 20th centuries when men and women were formulating a response to that very aggressive presence in their lives: Western colonialism and imperialism. They are fairly obscure figures, not men valorised in history text books such as Gandhi, Nehru or Mao Zedong. Men like Jamal al-Afghani and Liang Qichao and there are reasons why they are not as famous as the men they inspired later. “They are not known much,” Pankaj says, “because they don’t belong to the kind of triumphalist nationalist narratives, both of the West and the East. The histories we are told are nationalist histories and they talk about the emergence of the nation state from Western imperialism and they talk of the generation that led that struggle and the mass movements and then assumed power when the Europeans left. But these were the first generation and because they incarnated so many political ideas and tendencies, they almost seem like, in retrospect, confused or incoherent figures as opposed to the people like Mao Zedong who came later.”

Why the choice of these men to tell the story of Asia’s response to colonialism? Because, sometimes marginal figures tell you more about historical moments and their societies. When one reads about the histories of Egypt or China in the late 19th or early 20th centuries, he says, one keeps coming across references to these men. Both were born in traditional Asian families but were curious about the politics and ideologies of their time and were great travellers. But one never gets to know more. Who exactly are they as persons, politically, intellectually, what was the larger shape and trajectories of their lives? One never got a sense of what their journeys were. But there were connections between them. Liang Qichao admired Tagore who himself had travelled to Cairo to meet one of al-Afghani’s disciples and “suddenly as I read more widely, this world of Asia began to emerge more systematic than before in its response to the West.”

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista, via kadalkavithaigal)

remember that time winston churchill killed two million bengalis

ultraleftist:

i don’t understand how anybody could admire this monster

(via formerlybarbreyryswells)

deafmuslimpunx:

vintagesareeblouse:

Suffragettes in sarees. Very high necked blouses and the brooch that seems to have been common in this period-wonder if the brooches are in suffragette colours.  
One of the women is possibly Sophia Duleep Singh.  The site from where the picture is taken - Edwardian Promenade - is an interesting browse if you are interested in the period. 

hera ram.. I just died… now I gotta find a gorgeous 1920s saree…

deafmuslimpunx:

vintagesareeblouse:

Suffragettes in sarees. Very high necked blouses and the brooch that seems to have been common in this period-wonder if the brooches are in suffragette colours.  

One of the women is possibly Sophia Duleep Singh.  The site from where the picture is taken - Edwardian Promenade - is an interesting browse if you are interested in the period. 

hera ram.. I just died… now I gotta find a gorgeous 1920s saree…

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

ramyshamma:

Dosa - डोसा ( Indian Pancake )

ramyshamma:

Dosa - डोसा ( Indian Pancake )

(via indian-food)

The disappearing Sikh turban: Sacred symbol, shorthand for terror

fuckyeahsouthasia:

“When you see a turban and beard, what is the first thing you think of?” is a question Sikh Coalition’s Amardeep Singh often asks his American audience. The typical answer is: A terrorist. “We’ve had 11 years where the turban is equated with terrorism,” he tells The Guardian,“Is our community an intentional victim? … No, we’re collateral damage.”

Blame it all on Osama bin Laden who made infamous the turban and flowing beard, transforming the sacred symbols of Sikhism into a visual shorthand for Islamic extremism.

“I own a gas station. I am working there. People, they call me Bin Laden. Then I explain to them: sorry, you are misunderstanding. You are mixing us up with the Muslims. You try to explain about the turban and the beard. They still call you Bin Laden,” says Oak Creek resident Jeji Shergill in the Guardian article.

We don’t know as of now if Michael Page believed that the Oak Creek gurdwara was a mosque, or that he was killing Muslims. But there’s no mistaking the link between anti-Sikh and anti-Muslim bigotry in Oak Creek and the rest of the world. From Edinburgh to New York to Paris to Delhi, Sikhs have been routinely harassed and often killed for looking Sikh.

This knee-jerk bigotry has been blamed for the disappearing turban, which is in the danger of becoming extinct, both in India and abroad. Closer home, the first giant wave of visits to the barber shop were sparked by the anti-Sikh riots in the wake of Indira Gandhi’s assassination:

“There were widespread human rights violations. Young men with turbans or with Sikh names were more vulnerable to being picked up and thrown into illegal detention. Many Sikhs cut their hair and discarded their identity to escape police brutality,” said Ishwinder Singh Chadha, a member of the Institute of Sikh Studies. “In the 1990s, turbaned Sikhs were caricatured in TV shows and movies, and young Sikhs lost pride in their identity.”

The pressure to assimilate was no less in the West, where anti-immigrant racism has long been a problem, which redoubled in the wake of 9/11 due to anti-Muslim hysteria. From trouble with airport security to racial slurs on the street, the turban became a burdenattracting all kinds of unwelcome attention.

Add to the mix a global popular culture that devalues all forms of traditional attire as uncool. “They’ve adopted bad European habits: fast food, pubs and clubs,” says historian Patwant Singh in The Scotsman, “There is this terrible, misplaced urge to merge with the rest of the world.” The result is a new generation of Sikhs that has little time or interest in protecting the holy kesh.

While there are no exact figures, less than 20 percent of men under 30 now have uncut hair, as do nearly half of all Sikh men. So we now Save the Dastar efforts which include a World Turban Day, “Smart Turban 1.0″ CD-ROMs, Turban Tutor 1.0 software, dastar tying clinics, and even a beauty pageant for uncut sardars suitably labeled Mr Singh International.

“I owe my career to my dastar. I won the Mr Singh contest in 2007 and have since acted in television serials, modelled in a hundred-odd shows and also acted in one feature film. If I’d cut my hair even by mistake, my career would have collapsed,” Jitender Singh, a newsreader with a UK Punjabi news channel, tells Outlook magazine.

In a world obsessed with fame, appeals to narcissism often succeed more often than religious sentiment. So it is that young sardars are flocking to dastar camps to re-learn the lost art of tying a turban.

Saving the turban may not, however, preserve the sacred locks they are meant to protect. The dastar may well become just an accessory to be worn at will — long hair or not. “If you want to make an impression in Punjab, you still have to wear a smart turban. Be it to impress a would-be spouse, at weddings, or even for a job interview,” says Jaura Nagpal, owner of the Jaura Dastar Academy.

The irony is that the images from Oak Creek — of devout Sikhs in their distinctive headgear — represent a dwindling creed. Succumbing to the twin pressures of bigotry and modernity, the turban may well become a relic of the past, thereby erasing the troublesome association with terrorism. Sikhs may be safer in the future, and a whole lot poorer for it.

Source

simply-war:

High in the Karakoram, the stubborn armies of India and Pakistan have faced off for ninteen years on the Siachen Glacier, the world’s highest battleground and a flash point in the deadly dispute over Kashmir. The view from Sher (lion) post, a high-altitude Pakistani forward position, sits on a mountain ridge above the Chumach Glacier, 19,700 feet above sea level. | Location: Pakistan-occupied Kashmir. August 01, 2002. © Teru Kuwayama

simply-war:

High in the Karakoram, the stubborn armies of India and Pakistan have faced off for ninteen years on the Siachen Glacier, the world’s highest battleground and a flash point in the deadly dispute over Kashmir. The view from Sher (lion) post, a high-altitude Pakistani forward position, sits on a mountain ridge above the Chumach Glacier, 19,700 feet above sea level. | Location: Pakistan-occupied Kashmir. August 01, 2002. © Teru Kuwayama

Against the British Empire

mehreenkasana:

afraid-to-run asked: can you please recommend good books to recommend to ignorant english folk about the british empire in all it’s disgusting glory?

My answer:

Good question. I can speak from the South Asian experience of it; the Subcontinent - present day India, Pakistan, and to an extent Afghanistan. Before getting in the books I’d recommend, you should tell those who support British imperialism that life back then wasn’t as glorious as historians make it look like. With the basics:

  • Indian economy was the second largest economy in the world until the British came. During British rule (1857 to 1947) Indian economy grew at zero percent. That India did not grow for 90 years (when Industrial revolution was rewarding Europe and the US) is a tragic outcome of colonial rule’s lack of interest and incompetence. Credit goes to laissez faire capitalism pursued by India after 1992 and American capital market’s confidence and investments in India for India’s emergence as the second fastest growing economy in the world today. 
  • The subcontinent suffered too many famines during the British rule mostly attributable to mismanagement by the Empire.
  • The British Empire encouraged biased stratification in the subcontinental societies based on caste, color and creed. This continues to exist in modern day South Asia where social markers like these control the fates of many.
  • Many pro-Empire theorists argue that the British built modern cities with modern conveniences but it should be noted that these were exclusive zones not intended for the “natives” to enjoy.
  • There is another popular belief about British rule: ‘The British modernized Indian agriculture by building canals.’ But the actual record reveals a completely different story. “The roads and tanks and canals,” noted an observer in G. Thompson’s “India and the Colonies”, ”which Hindu or Mussulman (Muslim) governments constructed for the service of the nations and the good of the country have been suffered to fall into dilapidation; and now the want of the means of irrigation causes famines.” Montgomery Martin, in his standard work “The Indian Empire”, in 1858, noted that the old East India Company “omitted not only to initiate improvements, but even to keep in repair the old works upon which the revenue depended.” They screwed the natives over again.
  • In the early 1800s imports of Indian cotton and silk goods faced duties of 70-80%. British imports faced duties of 2-4%! As a result, British imports of cotton manufactures into India increased by a factor of 50, and Indian exports dropped to one-fourth. A similiar trend was noted in silk goods, woollens, iron, pottery, glassware and paper. As a result, millions of ruined artisans and craftsmen, spinners, weavers, potters, smelters and smiths were rendered jobless and had to become landless agricultural workers. They screwed us over again.
  • Reactionary borders.
  • And many other reasons why you should logic-slap those who support Empire(s).

The books I would suggest are: M. M. Ahluwalia’s Freedom Struggle in India. Shah, Khambata’s The Wealth and Taxable Capacity of India. G. Emerson’s Voiceless India.Brooks Adams’s The Law of Civilization and Decline. J. R. Seeley’s, Expansion of England. H. H. Wilson, History of British India. D. H Buchanan’s Development of Capitalist Enterprise in India.

Slightly unrelated but you should Gender and Community Under British Colonialism: Emotion, Struggle and Politics in a Chinese Village by Siu Keung Cheung as well. Hope this helps.

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)

Indian Female Revolutionary & Top Military Leader Dies

deafmuslimpunx:

R.I.P

NEW DELHI — Top Indian female revolutionary Lakshmi Sehgal, who fought Allied forces during World War II, died on Monday following a heart attack, a doctor said. She was 97.

Sehgal, who fought against Britain and its allies in an all-female regiment organised by Indian radical Subhash Chandra Bose, was hospitalised last Thursday after suffering a heart attack in the northern city of Kanpur.

The mother of two daughters slipped into a coma following a brain haemorrhage and was in critical condition until she died, a hospital doctor said.

“She was put on ventilator support but due to her advanced age she succumbed to multiple organ failure,” Kanpur Medical Centre hospital chief V.K. Johri told AFP by telephone.

Born on October 24, 1914, to a lawyer in the southern Indian city Chennai, then known as Madras, Sehgal studied medicine and practised as a gynaecologist before travelling to Singapore in 1940.

After three years in Singapore she met fiery nationalist Bose, who famously broke ranks with Indian independence champion Mahatma Gandhi over his non-violent approach to combating British rule on the sub-continent.

Bose, revered as a hero by many, enlisted Sehgal into his Indian National Army where she fought in a female regiment named after 18th-century Hindu warrior queen Laxmibai.

Sehgal was arrested in 1945 at the end of World War II as she retreated from the jungles of Myanmar towards India’s northeastern city of Imphal.

The revolutionary, known as “Captain Sehgal” by her supporters, was held under house arrest for several months in Myanmar and was then brought to Kolkata and freed, according to one of her daughters, Subhashini Ali.

“In terms of progressive female revolutionaries, Sehgal was number one because she also had a vision for social change and wanted equity in the Indian society,” said historian R. Gopinath from New Delhi’s Jamia Millia Islamia University.

“Sehgal and Bose were also instrumental in waging an armed opposition to the British, which was the first systematic opposition to colonial rule after the (anti-British) revolt of 1857 in India,” Gopinath told AFP.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh sent his condolences, describing her as an “icon of liberal values and selfless service”.

After India’s independence from the British in 1947, Sehgal joined the country’s main Marxist party which nominated her to a seat in the federal parliament’s upper house in 1971.

In 1998, India gave Sehgal the Padma Vibhushan, the country’s second highest civilian award and four years later she unsuccessfully contested India’s presidential elections.

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

Indian Scientist Forgotten in Higgs Boson Drama

cosmicyoruba:

he scientist in question, Satyendra Nath Bose, worked with Albert Einstein in the 1920s and made discoveries that led to a kind of particle being named for him.

It was Peter Higgs, a British physicist, who in the 1960s made advances in the field, resulting in the naming of  Higgs boson.

Indian newspapers have been unhappy that their star scientist’s name has somehow been forgotten in all of this.

For a start, only the “H” in Higgs boson is capitalized in most cases. In many cases, it’s referred to as the Higgs particle, erasing all allusion to the Indian scientist.

Last year, The Times of India opined: “Unfortunately, no one seems to care about, at least conveniently forgets, Satyendra Nath Bose, the late Indian physicist whose last name bears the mark of a set of particles including the elusive Higgs boson.”

Please don’t read the comments at the link. “We know lots of bosons, it is important not because of boson but because of Higgs, there’s only one Higgs…like sandwich vs Ferris wheel”

(Source: thefemaletyrant, via sugahwaatah)