The Sun's not yellow it's chicken: For the record: Malcom X was murdered by black Muslims, not white people, and JFK was a staunch supporter of civil...

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

jtem:

native-detroiter:

I’m sure white folks were happy that he was dead though. and Kennedy placated to the segregationists too much.

You’re certainty was never in doubt, only your sanity…

So Malcom X is murdered by black Muslims, and you’re angry because you imagine that some people were happy for it.

And JFK did more for civil rights than any President before him, and you still haven’t forgiven him…

You’re fucked up.

So, you were serious?

image

#1 You missed the ENTIRE point of Malcolm X’s words. We should not be celebrating Lincoln. And we should NOT be celebrating JFK. What did they do? The problem is still here. There’s a problem.. and it’s not fixed, so what did they actually do, then? Whites force down our throats the names of these White men like they’re some great heroes because it brainwashes us.The powers that be want you to think that these men solved the problem of racial oppression and inequality (the fact that it had to be “solved” TWICE is the hint that it hasn’t be solved).  They want you to think that the issue is solved so that you won’t be inclined to investigate your environment (only to realize that the issue is still here). These political figures are full of romanticized hot air. Before JFK, it was Lincoln. And one of the main reasons why the Civil Rights Movement gained momentum was because it was approaching 1965, a full hundred years after Emancipation.. a full hundred years after Lincoln had allegedly freed the slaves.. and Black people were forced to look around as the centennial approached and they realized that they weren’t free. That’s what Malcolm was saying. We can’t depend on the White man to free us… how can we? Look at the history.. the facts. At any given point in time, the issue of racial oppression could be solved. Point blank. It’s been 500 years for Christ’s sake. But you look around, and here it is.  

#2, You know NOTHING about JFK outside of a basic K-12 education. Do you know how I can tell? Cause you used a damn History Channel link, a tertiary source, as your source to combat against Malcolm X’s own words… X WAS THERE, alive. He is a primary source, whether you like it or not. His words trump all that shit you posted. Let’s delve deeper though… shall we?

If you would have even looked at your own link more closely, you would have realized that it only concerns 1963. JFK came into office in 1961………. The entire time between 1961 and 1963, people were harassed, abused, and murdered! Keep in mind people are, I dunno……… marching…. integrating the bus systems.. holding sit-ins…. disturbing White peace… etc.. .etc. In essence, the oppressed are making their OWN change and showing that the majority of people in the country want the oppression against Blacks to end (or at least make it less pronounced so they won’t have to see it on the news and feel White guilt so they can go to sleep at night feeling all cuddly like they’re a good person and not feel complicit in a system that oppresses others). JFK ain’t do shit but wait for the popular opinion to be in the clear majority. Only then did he move to be a decent human being. He was a politician like all other politicians. Nothing more. He played the fence on the issue as long as he could because he was running on the Democratic ticket and the South, or The Solid South as it is called, had voted Democratic since the end of Reconstruction. He didn’t want to lose those votes unless he knew he was covered and he had to let the very same White supremacists in the South that got him elected in the first place have their way (of course his later half-assed support for the Civil Rights Movement would have the South voting Republican, which they did in the very next election and which they continue to do to this very day…. just look at the last election results). And GOD, if it weren’t for the Cold War, he probably wouldn’t have done a damn thing at all. You can’t convince newly decolonized and independent African nations not to become allies with Russia when they turn on their televisions and see you treating the people that look like them like shit. So, it wasn’t simply that he finally decided to do the right thing. It was an issue of national security against Communism as well. 

You say that JFK did so much for Civil Rights, but I urge you to go do some actual research. And you will see, that he didn’t do much at all. After you look at what he did do, which culminates really into a Civil Rights bill which stalled in Congress when he was alive, so really the credit should possibly go to LBJ for that one, make a list of all the things he could have done/things he declined to do. You will undoubtedly find that he’s been greatly romanticized.  

#3 You know NOTHING… absolutely nothing about Malcolm X. You know how I can tell? You said he did nothing for Black people which is ABSOLUTELY GROSSLY DISGUSTINGLY MISINFORMED AND STRAIGHT UP FALSE. I can only direct you to this PBS documentary Malcolm X: Make it Plain. You have to know that that’s false though.. like, with your common sense, you should be able to tell. If he did nothing, why would we even be having this conversation? Would you even know his name if he did nothing? That documentary will also clear up for you why he was assassinated. Cause, I dunno wtf you think it was about…. but it’s not as simple as you think it is. You make it seem like X did something wrong so he was assassinated. Your common sense, especially since you’re so fond of JFK, should tell you that people don’t usually get assassinated for doing the wrong things. I wish they did. But alas… in America, people assassinate you for the right things that you did.

And it’s kinda funny, the straw that broke the camels back and made the Nation oust X was because he openly vocalized how didn’t give a damn about JFKs assassination. Lol. He said the chickens had come home to roost, which I’ve always taken to mean, JUST LIKE X MENTIONS IN THE ORIGINAL QUOTE THAT SPARKED THIS DISCUSSION,by playing the fence and bullshitting around, JFK let these White terrorist roam free and let them abuse and kill whoever they pleased… and he had blood on his hands. You let White people walk around thinking they can do whatever they want and kill whoever they want, it’s only a matter of time before one decides that he’s mad at you and kills you. That’s what X “popped off” about… the very topic of the quote.

All of these mentioned facts are things you should have known before you chose to enter the conversation. 

(Source: history.com, via fyeahcracker)

"I am neither a fanatic nor a dreamer. I am a Black man who loves justice and loves his people."

Malcolm X (via daniellemertina)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Ossie Davis - Eulogy for Malcolm X, February 27, 1965

Here, at this final hour, in this quiet place, Harlem has come to bid farewell to one of its brightest hopes, extinguished now and gone from us forever. For Harlem is where he worked and where he struggled and fought. His home of homes where his heart was and where his people are. And it is, therefore, most fitting that we meet once again in Harlem to share these last moments with him. For Harlem has ever been gracious to those who loved her, have fought for her and have defended her honor even to the dea th.


It is not in the memory of man that this beleaguered, unfortunate but nonetheless proud community has found a braver, more gallant young champion than this Afro-American who lies before us, unconquered still. I say the word again, as he would want me to: Afro-American. Afro-American Malcolm, who was a master, was most meticulous in his use of words. Nobody knew better than he the power words have over the minds of men. Malcolm had stopped being a ‘Negro’ years ago. It had become too small, too puny, too weak a word for him. Malcolm was bigger than that. Malcolm had become an Afro-American and he wanted so desperately that we, that all his people, would become Afro-Americans, too.

There are those who will consider it their duty, as friends of the Negro people, to tell us to revile him, to flee even, from the presence of his memory, to save ourselves by writing him out of the history of our turbulent times. Many will ask what Harlem finds to honor in this stormy, controversial and bold young captain. And we will smile. Many will say turn away, away from this man, for he is not a man but a demon, a monster, a subverter and an enemy of the black man. And we will smile. They will say that he is of hate, a fanatic, a racist who can only bring evil to the cause for which you struggle! And we will answer and say to them: Did you ever talk to Brother Malcolm? Did you ever touch him, or have him smile at you? Did you ever really listen to him? Did he ever do a mean thing? Was he ever himself associated with violence or any public disturbance? For if you did you would know him. And if you knew him you would know why we must honor him:

Malcolm was our manhood, our living, black manhood! This was his meaning to his people. Consigning these mortal remains to earth, the common mother of all, secure in the knowledge that what we place in the ground is no more now a man but a seed which, after the winter of our discontent, will come forth again to meet us. And we will know him then for what he was and is. A prince. Our own black shining prince who didn’t hesitate to die because he loved us so.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

“But?!?! I Can’t Be Racist Because…” [SHORT FILM]

“But?!?! I Can’t Be Racist Because is the first short film brought to you by theliberatedzonetv to commemorate the 47th anniversary since Malcolm X’s assassination.

“But?!?! We Can’t Be Racist Because…” touches on the issues in a day-to-day and global context of white supremacy in order to try to open up the in-depth discussion and understanding that we need so desperately.

Is racism a thing of the past?

Are white people victims of racism too?

Do you feel uncomfortable/awkward when white people emulate Black culture?

Does Black culture ‘belong’ to everyone?

Does suffering in Africa have nothing to do with people living in Europe?

Are YOU aware of how you fit into the white supremacist structure enforced by imperialism?

CAN WE SPEAK OPENLY AND HONESTLY ABOUT RACISM?

Please use this as a resource and the comments by co-producers Shamim Kisakye, Iman Hussein and Lizzie Phelan in education establishments, youth and community groups and amongst your friends in order to open up the discussion about the modern day manifestations of white supremacy.

If you would like co-producers Iman Hussein, Shamim Kisakye and Lizzie Phelan to come and discuss this film in a community or institutional setting, please contact theliberatedzone1957@gmail.com

This film was made with NO funding. To support further work like this please donate via www.lizzie-phelan.blogspot.com

dionthesocialist:

crayon-boxes:

2real


I got a bajillion requests to make this rebloggable, but I knew someone would do it for me after awhile.

dionthesocialist:

crayon-boxes:

2real

I got a bajillion requests to make this rebloggable, but I knew someone would do it for me after awhile.

(Source: thecrayonboxes, via dion-thesocialist)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

May 19: Birthday of Malcolm X and Ho Chi Minh, two great revolutionary fighters for social justice and national liberation.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

May 19: Birthday of Malcolm X and Ho Chi Minh, two great revolutionary fighters for social justice and national liberation.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

shedsumlight:

Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965), born Malcolm Little and also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz الحاجّ مالك الشباز‎
I believe this picture is from his trip to the Middle East and West Africa, which eventually included a pilgrimage to Mecca.

Thanks to Karen for recommending her great post!

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

shedsumlight:

Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965), born Malcolm Little and also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz الحاجّ مالك الشباز

I believe this picture is from his trip to the Middle East and West Africa, which eventually included a pilgrimage to Mecca.

Thanks to Karen for recommending her great post!

blunthought:

“What I want to know is how the white man, with the blood of black people dripping off his fingers, can have the audacity to be asking black people why they hate him?”
— Malcolm X

blunthought:

“What I want to know is how the white man, with the blood of black people dripping off his fingers, can have the audacity to be asking black people why they hate him?”

— Malcolm X

(via dreams-from-my-father)

(Source: plusnineutc, via radicalstellnotales)

dreams-from-my-father:

*cough* *cough* The Nation of Islam
Or when blackness starts to eat itself

dreams-from-my-father:

*cough* *cough* The Nation of Islam

Or when blackness starts to eat itself

(Source: illmatic-halflife)

hailxseitan:

“You get your freedom by letting your enemy know that you’ll do anything to get it. Then you’ll get it. It’s the only way you’ll get it.” - Malcolm X

hailxseitan:

“You get your freedom by letting your enemy know that you’ll do anything to get it. Then you’ll get it. It’s the only way you’ll get it.” - Malcolm X

(via spitting-whys-deactivated201211)

moonlight-skydreams:

“I don’t call it violence when it’s self-defense, I call it intelligence.”~Malcolm X

moonlight-skydreams:

“I don’t call it violence when it’s self-defense, I call it intelligence.”~Malcolm X

(Source: mszone-6)


Malcolm X
Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925 in Omaha, Nebraska. His mother, Louis Norton Little, was a homemaker occupied with the family’s eight children. His father, Earl Little, was an outspoken Baptist minister and avid supporter of Black Nationalist leader Marcus Garvey. Earl’s civil rights activism prompted death threats from the white supremacist organization Black Legion, forcing the family to relocate twice before Malcolm’s fourth birthday. Regardless of the Little’s efforts to elude the Legion, in 1929 their Lansing, Michigan home was burned to the ground, and two years later Earl’s mutilated body was found lying across the town’s trolley tracks. Police ruled both accidents, but the Little’s were certain that members of the Black Legion were responsible. Louise had an emotional breakdown several years after the death of her husband and was committed to a mental institution. Her children were split up amongst various foster homes and orphanages.Malcolm was a smart, focused student and graduated from junior high at the top of his class. However, when a favorite teacher told Malcolm his dream of becoming a lawyer was “no realistic goal for a nigger,” Malcolm lost interest in school. He dropped out, spent some time in Boston, Massachusetts working various odd jobs, and then traveled to Harlem, New York where he committed petty crimes. By 1942 Malcolm was coordinating various narcotic, prostitution and gambling rings.Eventually Malcolm and his buddy, Malcolm “Shorty” Jarvis, moved back to Boston, where they were arrested and convicted on burglary charges in 1946. Malcolm placated himself by using the seven-year prison sentence to further his education. It was during this period of self-enlightenment that Malcolm’s brother Reginald visited and discussed his recent conversion to the Muslim religious organization the Nation of Islam. Intrigued, Malcolm studied the teachings of Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad. Muhammad taught that white society actively worked to keep African-Americans from empowering themselves and achieving political, economic and social success. Among other goals, the Nation of Islam fought for a state of their own, separate from one inhabited by white people. By the time he was paroled in 1952, Malcolm was a devoted follower with the new surname “X.” He considered “Little” a slave name and chose the “X” to signify his lost tribal name.
Intelligent and articulate, Malcolm was appointed a minister and national spokesman for the Nation of Islam. Elijah Muhammad also charged him with establishing new mosques in cities such as Detroit, Michigan and Harlem, New York. Malcolm utilized newspaper columns, radio and television to communicate the Nation of Islam’s message across the United States. His charisma, drive and conviction attracted an astounding number of new members. Malcolm was largely credited with increasing membership in the Nation of Islam from 500 in 1952 to 30,000 in 1963.The crowds and controversy surrounding Malcolm made him a media magnet. He was featured in a week-long television special with Mike Wallace in 1959, The Hate That Hate Produced, that explored fundamentals of the Nation of Islam and Malcolm’s emergence as one of its most important leaders. After the special, Malcolm was faced with the uncomfortable reality that his fame had eclipsed that of his mentor Elijah Muhammad.Racial tensions ran increasingly high during the early 1960s. In addition to the media, Malcolm’s vivid personality had captured the government’s attention. As membership in the Nation of Islam continued to grow, FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) agents infiltrated the organization (one even acted at Malcolm’s bodyguard) and secretly placed bugs, wiretaps and cameras surveillance equipment to monitor the group’s activities.Malcolm’s faith was dealt a crushing blow at the height of the civil rights movement in 1963. He learned that Elijah Muhammad was secretly having relations with as many as six women in the Nation of Islam, some of which had resulted in children. Since his conversion Malcolm had strictly adhered to the teachings of Muhammad, including remaining celibate until his marriage to Betty Shabazz in 1958. Malcolm refused Muhammad’s request to keep the matter quiet. He was deeply hurt by the deception of Muhammad, whom he had considered a prophet, and felt guilty about the masses he had lead into what he now felt was a fraudulent organization.
When Malcolm received criticism after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy for saying, “[Kennedy] never foresaw that the chickens would come home to roost so soon,” Muhammad “silenced” him for 90 days. Malcolm suspected he was silenced for another reason. In March 1964 he terminated his relationship with the Nation of Islam and founded the Muslim Mosque, Inc.That same year, Malcolm went on a pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The trip proved life altering, as Malcolm met “blonde-haired, blued-eyed men I could call my brothers.” He returned to the United States with a new outlook on integration. This time, instead of just preaching to African-Americans, he had a message for all races.Relations between Malcolm and the Nation of Islam had become volatile after he renounced Elijah Muhammad. Informants working in the Nation of Islam warned that Malcolm had been marked for assassination (one man had even been ordered to help plant a bomb in his car). After repeated attempts on his life, Malcolm rarely traveled anywhere without bodyguards. On February 14, 1965 the home where Malcolm, Betty and their four daughters lived in East Elmhurst, New York was firebombed (the family escaped physical injury).At a speaking engagement in the Manhattan’s Audubon Ballroom on February 21, 1965 three gunmen rushed Malcolm onstage and shot him 15 times at close range. The 39-year-old was pronounced dead on arrival at New York’s Columbia Presbyterian Hospital. Fifteen hundred people attended Malcolm’s funeral in Harlem at the Faith Temple Church of God in Christ on February 27, 1965. After the ceremony, friends took the shovels from the gravediggers and buried Malcolm themselves. Later that year, Betty gave birth to their twin daughters.Malcolm’s assassins, Talmadge Hayer, Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson were convicted of first-degree murder in March 1966. The three men were all members of the Nation of Islam.The legacy of Malcolm X has moved through generations as the subject of numerous documentaries, books and movies. A tremendous resurgence of interest occurred in 1992 when director Spike Lee released the acclaimed Malcolm X movie. The film received Oscar nominations for Best Actor (Denzel Washington) and Best Costume Design.Malcolm X is buried at the Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York.

Malcolm X

Malcolm X was born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925 in Omaha, Nebraska. His mother, Louis Norton Little, was a homemaker occupied with the family’s eight children. His father, Earl Little, was an outspoken Baptist minister and avid supporter of Black Nationalist leader Marcus Garvey. Earl’s civil rights activism prompted death threats from the white supremacist organization Black Legion, forcing the family to relocate twice before Malcolm’s fourth birthday. Regardless of the Little’s efforts to elude the Legion, in 1929 their Lansing, Michigan home was burned to the ground, and two years later Earl’s mutilated body was found lying across the town’s trolley tracks. Police ruled both accidents, but the Little’s were certain that members of the Black Legion were responsible. Louise had an emotional breakdown several years after the death of her husband and was committed to a mental institution. Her children were split up amongst various foster homes and orphanages.

Malcolm was a smart, focused student and graduated from junior high at the top of his class. However, when a favorite teacher told Malcolm his dream of becoming a lawyer was “no realistic goal for a nigger,” Malcolm lost interest in school. He dropped out, spent some time in Boston, Massachusetts working various odd jobs, and then traveled to Harlem, New York where he committed petty crimes. By 1942 Malcolm was coordinating various narcotic, prostitution and gambling rings.

Eventually Malcolm and his buddy, Malcolm “Shorty” Jarvis, moved back to Boston, where they were arrested and convicted on burglary charges in 1946. Malcolm placated himself by using the seven-year prison sentence to further his education. It was during this period of self-enlightenment that Malcolm’s brother Reginald visited and discussed his recent conversion to the Muslim religious organization the Nation of Islam. Intrigued, Malcolm studied the teachings of Nation of Islam leader Elijah Muhammad. Muhammad taught that white society actively worked to keep African-Americans from empowering themselves and achieving political, economic and social success. Among other goals, the Nation of Islam fought for a state of their own, separate from one inhabited by white people. By the time he was paroled in 1952, Malcolm was a devoted follower with the new surname “X.” He considered “Little” a slave name and chose the “X” to signify his lost tribal name.

Intelligent and articulate, Malcolm was appointed a minister and national spokesman for the Nation of Islam. Elijah Muhammad also charged him with establishing new mosques in cities such as Detroit, Michigan and Harlem, New York. Malcolm utilized newspaper columns, radio and television to communicate the Nation of Islam’s message across the United States. His charisma, drive and conviction attracted an astounding number of new members. Malcolm was largely credited with increasing membership in the Nation of Islam from 500 in 1952 to 30,000 in 1963.

The crowds and controversy surrounding Malcolm made him a media magnet. He was featured in a week-long television special with Mike Wallace in 1959, The Hate That Hate Produced, that explored fundamentals of the Nation of Islam and Malcolm’s emergence as one of its most important leaders. After the special, Malcolm was faced with the uncomfortable reality that his fame had eclipsed that of his mentor Elijah Muhammad.

Racial tensions ran increasingly high during the early 1960s. In addition to the media, Malcolm’s vivid personality had captured the government’s attention. As membership in the Nation of Islam continued to grow, FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) agents infiltrated the organization (one even acted at Malcolm’s bodyguard) and secretly placed bugs, wiretaps and cameras surveillance equipment to monitor the group’s activities.

Malcolm’s faith was dealt a crushing blow at the height of the civil rights movement in 1963. He learned that Elijah Muhammad was secretly having relations with as many as six women in the Nation of Islam, some of which had resulted in children. Since his conversion Malcolm had strictly adhered to the teachings of Muhammad, including remaining celibate until his marriage to Betty Shabazz in 1958. Malcolm refused Muhammad’s request to keep the matter quiet. He was deeply hurt by the deception of Muhammad, whom he had considered a prophet, and felt guilty about the masses he had lead into what he now felt was a fraudulent organization.

When Malcolm received criticism after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy for saying, “[Kennedy] never foresaw that the chickens would come home to roost so soon,” Muhammad “silenced” him for 90 days. Malcolm suspected he was silenced for another reason. In March 1964 he terminated his relationship with the Nation of Islam and founded the Muslim Mosque, Inc.

That same year, Malcolm went on a pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The trip proved life altering, as Malcolm met “blonde-haired, blued-eyed men I could call my brothers.” He returned to the United States with a new outlook on integration. This time, instead of just preaching to African-Americans, he had a message for all races.

Relations between Malcolm and the Nation of Islam had become volatile after he renounced Elijah Muhammad. Informants working in the Nation of Islam warned that Malcolm had been marked for assassination (one man had even been ordered to help plant a bomb in his car). After repeated attempts on his life, Malcolm rarely traveled anywhere without bodyguards. On February 14, 1965 the home where Malcolm, Betty and their four daughters lived in East Elmhurst, New York was firebombed (the family escaped physical injury).

At a speaking engagement in the Manhattan’s Audubon Ballroom on February 21, 1965 three gunmen rushed Malcolm onstage and shot him 15 times at close range. The 39-year-old was pronounced dead on arrival at New York’s Columbia Presbyterian Hospital. Fifteen hundred people attended Malcolm’s funeral in Harlem at the Faith Temple Church of God in Christ on February 27, 1965. After the ceremony, friends took the shovels from the gravediggers and buried Malcolm themselves. Later that year, Betty gave birth to their twin daughters.

Malcolm’s assassins, Talmadge Hayer, Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson were convicted of first-degree murder in March 1966. The three men were all members of the Nation of Islam.

The legacy of Malcolm X has moved through generations as the subject of numerous documentaries, books and movies. A tremendous resurgence of interest occurred in 1992 when director Spike Lee released the acclaimed Malcolm X movie. The film received Oscar nominations for Best Actor (Denzel Washington) and Best Costume Design.

Malcolm X is buried at the Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York.

(Source: thepeacefulterrorist)

"Usually the black racist has been produced by the white racist. In most cases where you see it, it is the reaction to white racism, and if you analyze it closely, it’s not really black racism… If we react to white racism with a violent reaction, to me that’s not black racism. If you come to put a rope around my neck and I hang you for it, to me that’s not racism. Yours is racism, but my reaction has nothing to do with racism…"

Malcolm X

On the difference between white racism and black racism. Harvard Law School Forum. December 16, 1964

(via afrocentricmiss)

(Source: blackgirlwithanopinion)

anticapitalist:

(h/t)

anticapitalist:

(h/t)

(Source: anticapitalist, via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)