[TW: medical abuse]I was born with a Blue Spot. Here is the story of what it is, and how a white man stole it.

girljanitor:

The only time I ever met me father was an hour after I was born. He took one look at me and said, “this is my child.” When my mother and her family wondered how he was so certain, he showed them my Blue Spot. All of his family had been born with Blue Spots; some of my mother’s family knew of them because of Roma heritage, but I only child in at least a generation who’d been born with one.

Also, my Spot was permanent like my father’s. When I turned 12 and the Spot stayed, my mom told me the full story of my heritage and who my father had been, what he was like, and how they had met.

In my 20’s I went to a white dermatologist for an unrelated reason, and he completely flipped out over my Spot. He was utterly convinced it was some kind of skin cancer. I explained to him over and over what it was and why it was there; I’d seen a Chinese dermatologist in my childhood and an Indian dermatologist in my teens; none of them had even bothered to mention the spot other than to comment that it was there, and permanent (unlike some congenital Blue Spots that fade away with age.)

This white guy threatened and browbeat me until i finally agreed to let him biopsy it. I made him promise that he wouldn’t take it, I kept telling him that I liked my Spot, it was important to me. He really was saying to me that if I didn’t let him do this I would die. He promised that the biopsy would only take a tiny piece of skin, and it wouldn’t make any difference in its appearance.

When I got home and took the bandage off, I saw two stitches holding together the wound where my Blue Spot had been.

I cried and wouldn’t get out of bed for days.

As time passed, i noticed the skin around the scar was showing blue where the redness was fading. As more time passed, the blue color spread out more and now I have an irregular scar on my lower back that is surrounded by a blue color.

All I have of my father is one blurry photo and my scarred Blue Spot.

It is a reminder to me that white people will always try to steal my heritage and who I am.

It is a reminder that no matter how hard they try, they can never take it away from me.

(via dadgenes)

"Chief Joyi railed against the white man, who he believed had deliberately sundered the Xhosa tribe, dividing brother from brother. The white man had told the Thembus that their true chief was the great white queen across the ocean and that they were her subjects. But the white queen brought nothing but misery and perfidy to the black people, and if she was a chief she was an evil chief. Chief Joyi’s war stories and his indictment of the British made me feel angry and cheated, as though I had already been robbed of my own birthright.
Chief Joyi said that the African people lived in relative peace until the coming of the abelungu, the white people, who arrived from across the sea with fire-breathing weapons. Once, he said, the Thembu, the Mpondo, the Xhosa, and the Zulu were all children of one father, and lived as brothers. The white man shattered the abantu, the fellowship, of the various tribes. The white man was hungry and greedy for land, and the black man shared the land with him as they shared the air and water; land was not for man to possess. But the white man took the land as you might seize another man’s horse.
I did not yet know that the real history of our country was not to be found in standard British textbooks, which claimed South Africa began with the landing of Jan Van Riebeeck at the Cape of Good Hope in 1652. It was from Chief Joyi that I began to discover that the history of the Bantu-speaking peoples began far to the north, in a country of lakes and green plains and valleys, and that slowly over the millennia we made our way down to the very tip of this great continent."

Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela

… sounds super familiar.

(via adailyriot)

(via karnythia)

fuckyeahethnicwomen:

Is there not one about the war bonnet?

fracturedrefuge:

Bringin’ this back.

Not only because Halloween is coming up, but because the lovely golden-zephyr was gracious to make one about Romani “costumes”!

Remember, as this-is-not-native reminds us, there are endless cute, sexy, funny, even offensive costumes that don’t perpetuate racist stereotypes. There is really no excuse.

selchieproductions:

[image description: Paul Raffaele said a Suruwaha girl refused to shake his hand because she wanted to kill him. In fact, he was wearing so much sun cream the Suruwaha thought he had a skin disease.]
© Survival International
Australia’s Channel 7 network has been found guilty by the press regulator of serious violations of the broadcasting code, after screening a report so extreme it was branded ‘Freakshow TV’ by Survival International.
The report labelled Brazil’s Suruwaha tribe as child murderers; ‘Stone Age’ relics; and ‘one of the worst human rights violators in the world’.
Survival complained to Australia’s regulator ACMA after Channel 7 refused Survival’s request to issue a correction to its report, broadcast on its Sunday Night programme.
In a landmark judgment, ACMA has now ruled that the Channel was guilty of breaking its racism clause – ‘provoking intense dislike, serious contempt or severe ridicule against a person or group’ – believed to be the first time it has found a broadcaster guilty of this serious offence under the 2010 TV Code. It has also ruled that the Channel was guilty of broadcasting inaccurate material.
Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This was one of the worst reports about contemporary tribal people we’d ever seen. The Indians were made out to be cruel and inhuman monsters, in the spirit of 19th century colonialist scorn for ‘primitive savages’.
‘What makes it even worse is that the Suruwaha have been under attack by fundamentalist missionaries for years, who are waging a campaign slandering them as child-murderers. The missionaries are behind a draft law to allow them to remove Indian children from their communities, something with horrifying echoes of the Stolen Generations scandal.
‘The Channel 7 crew told the Suruwaha they wanted to allow them to put their side of the story – but actually produced one of the most grotesquely distorted pictures of a tribal people we can remember. The programme even openly fundraised for the missionaries on its website. We hope this ruling will mean we’re less likely to see such dangerous rubbish on TV in the future.’
Channel 7 is seeking a judicial review of the ruling in Australia’s Federal Court.
Note to Editors:
Survival has written a set of ethical guidelines to help filmmakers work responsibly with tribal peoples. It is also using its Stamp it Out campaign to challenge racist depictions, however unwitting, in the media.
Previously, Survival has highlighted how British TV company Cicada Films was accused of irresponsibly endangering the lives of Peruvian Indians by allegedly provoking a flu epidemic amongst them; and how a TV series about an Amazonian tribe was labelled ‘staged, false, fabricated and distorted’ by experts.
Download a Survival briefing sheet on the proposed ‘Muwaji’s law’, the result of a campaign in Brazil by the fundamentalist missionary organization JOCUM (pdf, 70 KB). JOCUM are the Brazilian branch of the US organization Youth with a Mission.
Download a briefing sheet on what experts and Indians say about JOCUM’s infanticide allegations (pdf, 49 KB).
Download statements from Suruwaha Indians about the Channel 7 report (pdf, 33 KB).

selchieproductions:

[image description: Paul Raffaele said a Suruwaha girl refused to shake his hand because she wanted to kill him. In fact, he was wearing so much sun cream the Suruwaha thought he had a skin disease.]

© Survival International

Australia’s Channel 7 network has been found guilty by the press regulator of serious violations of the broadcasting code, after screening a report so extreme it was branded ‘Freakshow TV’ by Survival International.

The report labelled Brazil’s Suruwaha tribe as child murderers; ‘Stone Age’ relics; and ‘one of the worst human rights violators in the world’.

Survival complained to Australia’s regulator ACMA after Channel 7 refused Survival’s request to issue a correction to its report, broadcast on its Sunday Night programme.

In a landmark judgment, ACMA has now ruled that the Channel was guilty of breaking its racism clause – ‘provoking intense dislike, serious contempt or severe ridicule against a person or group’ – believed to be the first time it has found a broadcaster guilty of this serious offence under the 2010 TV Code. It has also ruled that the Channel was guilty of broadcasting inaccurate material.

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This was one of the worst reports about contemporary tribal people we’d ever seen. The Indians were made out to be cruel and inhuman monsters, in the spirit of 19th century colonialist scorn for ‘primitive savages’.

‘What makes it even worse is that the Suruwaha have been under attack by fundamentalist missionaries for years, who are waging a campaign slandering them as child-murderers. The missionaries are behind a draft law to allow them to remove Indian children from their communities, something with horrifying echoes of the Stolen Generations scandal.

‘The Channel 7 crew told the Suruwaha they wanted to allow them to put their side of the story – but actually produced one of the most grotesquely distorted pictures of a tribal people we can remember. The programme even openly fundraised for the missionaries on its website. We hope this ruling will mean we’re less likely to see such dangerous rubbish on TV in the future.’

Channel 7 is seeking a judicial review of the ruling in Australia’s Federal Court.

Note to Editors:

  • Survival has written a set of ethical guidelines to help filmmakers work responsibly with tribal peoples. It is also using its Stamp it Out campaign to challenge racist depictions, however unwitting, in the media.

You can learn a lot from someone based on how they react to a POC telling them they’re doing something unintentionally racist.

this-is-not-native:

How someone interested in fighting racism responds:

  • “I didn’t know that! I’ll avoid doing/saying that from now on.”

How someone who doesn’t care about racism responds:

  • “Who are you, the PC police?”
  • “Calm down.”
  • “It’s really not a big deal.”
  • “You’re just racist against white people!”
  • “There are bigger battles to fight.”
  • “I don’t complain when someone does (rude but not racist thing against white people)!”
  • “My (POC) friend says/does that all the time!”
  • “I was trying to APPRECIATE you!”

Fact: If your argument involves any of the following, it’s not an effective argument.

(via moniquill)

On Cultural Appropriation (TW: NUDITY)

moniquill:

kanishtaa-naijuuk-shiiragn:

I am a Caucasian, and this is my stuff. Is this cultural appropriation?

I don’t think so.

It’s called having a healthy appreciation for Native American culture, and a deep respect for both nature and my personal spirituality. Ever since I was a child, I have been fascinated by Aboriginal culture, lifestyle, and spirituality. My father took me to Pow-Wows in our area, and put me in a camp that taught me a bit about the Aboriginal culture (since that was the tribe that was in my area at the time). I learned how to set a teepee, how to light a fire by rubbing sticks, how to make pemmican and a tea using cedar pines, among many other such things.
Many (if not all of) the items above were bought from Native Americans at Pow-Wows andNative American art stores.
My spirituality is similar if not somewhat related to some of the Native American beliefs, and I was raised to love and respect nature. I identify as otherkin, and am a Green Pagan Witch.

This is not cultural appropriation.

[Image removed for being egregiously awful]

…And this is.

Using such a sacred item in such a disrespectful way is offensive.

Please understand this difference, and stop whining and throwing “cultural appropriation” everywhere.

Thank you.

Sweetie, you might want to sit for this, because I have a lot to say.

You don’t get to decide what is and isn’t cultural appropriation. The person who is hurt gets to tell you what is hurtful, not the other way around.

Let’s start with some fact checking:

‘Aboriginal’ isn’t a tribe. It’s a word describing indigeneity. The original native folks of a land are its aboriginal people. For example, white people are aboriginal in Europe.

Therefor ‘The Aboriginal Culture’ was not ‘the tribe in your area at the time’

What time, by the way? Do you think that the NDNs in your area are gone?

“I learned how to set a teepee”

So a plains culture, then? I hope?

“how to light a fire by rubbing sticks”

If you weren’t using a bowdrill, this is some bullshit. Nature Survival Skills aren’t an NDN thing, they’re a nature scouts thing. NDN people have routinely used the most convenient technology available to them; bowdrills and flint/striker were popular pre-contact because they were the height of technology in the 1490’s. Casual observation tells me that the most popular firelighting method among NDNs is this:

(beaded lighter cover by Mary Whiteshield Lomax)

Cedars and pines are two different kinds of tree. Cedar pines aren’t a thing. Both of them will make a tea that cures scurvy, though.

“Many (if not all of) the items above were bought from Native Americans at Pow-Wows and Native American art stores.”

Yes good. It’s good to support native artists. But here’s the thing though: You can still appropriate using things that you’ve bought from NDN artisans.

Have fun with your pagan self, but don’t think for a minute that you know shit about ‘Native American Beliefs’. Because you think that those words mean something. NDN spirituality is not monolithic, a frillion nations have a frillion belief systems, some of which are mutually exclusive to others and none of which are based on converting outsiders. We do not recruit.

You have a problem, and it’s name is romanticism and/or exoticism.

It’s not that you’re buying/owning.displaying in your home art made by NDN people. That’s cool. In fact, that’s invited.

It’s that you’re doing it because you think it has some kind of deeper meaning than ‘look at this amazing and beautiful art that I bought!’

It’s because you think that making fire with sticks and preparing pemmican and drinking cedar or pine tea or otherwise engaging in anachronistic play is somehow genuinely NDN. Let me ask you, would you visit a living museum like Old Sturbridge Village or Colonial Williamsburg to feel more genuinely white? To feel -deeply connected- to something magical and spiritual?

NDS people are not anachronistic. We’re not magical elves, either. You been drinkin’ the Noble Savage and Magical Indian koolaid.

This attitude is not less hurtful to me than fucking hipsters frolicking in fields in war bonnets.

I want you to take a few minutes and go watch Chimamanda Adichie talking about The danger of a single story. I can wait.

The kind of racism you’re exhibiting HURTS ME.

When you only speak about Native American people in the past tense, in certain contexts. When you only mention us as pertains to White history. When you talk about us in stereotypical ways and think that we have just one culture and that you can be a part of it. When you conflate being NDN with anachronism and animals and magic. This is racist. This is how racist thought is cemented in your mind and the minds of others.

When you make posts like this absolving YOUR form of racism because it’s not as egregiously awful as OTHER forms of racism, it adds one more post to the ponderous pile of this shit that creates the pervasive cultural notion that this is what people should think of when they hear ‘Native American’ , and IT HURTS REAL NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE. It creates, in the minds of the people that see your post, a stereotype - a caricature of what Native people are/should be like that erases us in reality and removes us from their perception of the modern world.

I am tired of cultural appropriation.

I am tired of having to constantly be an educator of people who largely don’t want to be educated and of people I’m trying to educate getting self-righteously angry (And refusing to learn. And continuing to be angry) when they’re confronted. I am tired of being -hurt- by racism. I am tired of people who claim that they love and admire ‘Native American Culture’ but in fact know fuck all about Pan-Indian culture or the fact that ‘Native American’ is a blanket term for hundreds of hugely disparate indigenous nations across two continents and that we do NOT have just one culture.

And before you argue that you didn’t MEAN to be racist or that you were just having fun, before your many white allies rally around you to tell me how wrong I am and what a good person you are and how you are not a racist…know this:

Racism is not in your intent.

Your intent is immaterial in how racist your actions are.

This isn’t about you BEING a racist. It’s about you DOING A THING that is racist.

Your intent doesn’t change it. Your ignorance of its meaning doesn’t change it. It’s got nothing to do with you as a person and everything to do with the meaning of your action in the context of sociocultural history.

Please watch this video.

If you think that the stuff you did at summercamp or the DEEP FEELS about the art you bought are somehow ‘celebrating’ anyone’s culture, that speaks to some really problematic shit in how you’ve been educated, what you’ve been exposed to, what you think you know about what Native Americans are and who we are. And while it’s not your fault that the culture of your upbringing has handed you that shit on a silver platter and said ‘eat it’, and not your fault that you did eat it without knowing better, it’s still bullshit and it’s still hurtful. You have the Internet at your disposal. You can become educated as to what Native Americans really are like and what we really are about. And it’s not this Colors of the Wind bullshit.

THIS HURTS ME. PLEASE STOP.

And while I’m at it re: educating you, lemme just grab a quote from a subsequent post:

“It’s like nobody cared up until a few months ago, and now everybody is crying “cultural appropriation”!”

FOR FUCK’S SAKE, CHILD.

WE HAVE BEEN TALKING ABOUT THIS SHIT FOR THE LAST 200+ YEARS. YOU ONLY STARTED NOTICING A FEW MONTHS AGO. THAT DOESN’T MAKE THIS SHIT NEW.

Look at your life, look at your choices.

iamabutchsolo:

I keep having discussions about Disney films and how racist many of the classics are, but the subject that I most fall upon is the 1953 version of Peter Pan, which holds an absurd breadth of racial stereotypes that there are musical numbers and plot sequences directly the product of such racial stereotypes of Native Americans. Certainly, the film’s portrayal undoubtedly permeated into the pretend games of children and their perception of how Native Americans behaved - I know this movie influenced me to wear feathers in my hair, pretend to do Indian tribal dances, and say “how” over and over.
The defense I hear most often from people is that films like Peter Pan “were not racist at the time they were made.”
What they really mean is that white people didn’t think it was racist at the time they were made. The film is just as racist then just as it is now. The fact that people can say movies like Peter Pan were “products of their time” negate that actual Native Americans have been vocal about their objections to the homogenization and stereotypical portrayal of their cultures and their race for literally centuries, but white people just didn’t listen to them. The constant apologism that something “wasn’t racist back then” implies that it is white society that deems what is racist, rather than the people of color directly affected and portrayed. Again, if it is racist now, it was racist then.
Also, children buy into these stereotypes, but children didn’t make this film; grown men did. It was a grown man who wrote the original Peter Pan story and its stereotypical portrayals of Natives. People talk about white creators back then as if they were little kids who didn’t know better. We shouldn’t give them an easy reprieve because a bunch of grown men “didn’t know better” to consider that Native Americans were people and not caricatures. If you like Peter Pan, you can like it, but we shouldn’t downplay its racism nor make excuses.

iamabutchsolo:

I keep having discussions about Disney films and how racist many of the classics are, but the subject that I most fall upon is the 1953 version of Peter Pan, which holds an absurd breadth of racial stereotypes that there are musical numbers and plot sequences directly the product of such racial stereotypes of Native Americans. Certainly, the film’s portrayal undoubtedly permeated into the pretend games of children and their perception of how Native Americans behaved - I know this movie influenced me to wear feathers in my hair, pretend to do Indian tribal dances, and say “how” over and over.

The defense I hear most often from people is that films like Peter Pan “were not racist at the time they were made.”

What they really mean is that white people didn’t think it was racist at the time they were made. The film is just as racist then just as it is now. The fact that people can say movies like Peter Pan were “products of their time” negate that actual Native Americans have been vocal about their objections to the homogenization and stereotypical portrayal of their cultures and their race for literally centuries, but white people just didn’t listen to them. The constant apologism that something “wasn’t racist back then” implies that it is white society that deems what is racist, rather than the people of color directly affected and portrayed. Again, if it is racist now, it was racist then.

Also, children buy into these stereotypes, but children didn’t make this film; grown men did. It was a grown man who wrote the original Peter Pan story and its stereotypical portrayals of Natives. People talk about white creators back then as if they were little kids who didn’t know better. We shouldn’t give them an easy reprieve because a bunch of grown men “didn’t know better” to consider that Native Americans were people and not caricatures. If you like Peter Pan, you can like it, but we shouldn’t downplay its racism nor make excuses.

(Source: daughterofmulan, via casual-isms)

apihtawikosisan:

pro-patria-mori:

Iroquois warrior scalping a white prisoner.

Fuck does this ever piss me off.
There were very few instances of scalping before the Europeans arrived.  But then Europeans offered a bounty for the scalps of men, women and children.  Most of the victims of scalping were native people, at the hands of Europeans who made money from doing this.
The idea that indigenous peoples engaged in this practice in any widespread manner pre-Contact is propaganda.  This picture should show a white man scalping a native woman and her children for profit.

apihtawikosisan:

pro-patria-mori:

Iroquois warrior scalping a white prisoner.

Fuck does this ever piss me off.

There were very few instances of scalping before the Europeans arrived.  But then Europeans offered a bounty for the scalps of men, women and children.  Most of the victims of scalping were native people, at the hands of Europeans who made money from doing this.

The idea that indigenous peoples engaged in this practice in any widespread manner pre-Contact is propaganda.  This picture should show a white man scalping a native woman and her children for profit.

I’m not racist but I need to say this…

dearwhitefolk:

itsamessinmyhead:

African Americans need to fucking STOP pulling the slavery heritage card!
I’m Native American.
You know what that means? My people were mass murdered, raped, kicked off our own land, converted and guess what?
WERE THE VERY FIRST FUCKING SLAVES IN THIS COUNTRY BECAUSE IT WAS OUR LAND FIRST!
You learn about The Trail of Tears in history class for about a week. WE GET ONE SMALL WEEK IN ONE CLASS. WE DON’T GET A FUCKING MONTH! You don’t hear me going around saying “Is it because I’m indian?” “You don’t get to speak to me like that, youuuuu don’t know what my ancestors went through”
First off, neither do you because you live in the 21st century.
Second off, your own people sold one another to the white men so look in the mirror and be pissed.
Third off, get the fuck overt it. You get free fucking college and benefits because of what your ancestors went through even if you’re like 1/16. I’m fucking 25% Indian but i don’t get benefits so shut the fuck up because my race got fucked harder! There is no excuse to be racist towards all white people now because all white people were once racist towards your ancestors. Past is the past, especially when it isn’t your very own past.
Slavery was fucked up.
Racism is fucked up but people need to stop pulling the race card in order to get rid of racism.
Best way to do that is picture everyone as your favourite color, that way they are all lovely and equal to you. It isn’t until you get to know them on the inside that you get to turn them to your least favourite color. I see everyone as lime green until you piss me off, then you become an ugly ass yellowish/orange color!

Dear White Folk,
Saying the phrase “I’m not racist, but” is a clear indicator that you actually are a racist.

Dear White Folk,
There is no such thing as a Race Card which gets us out of any situation.

Dear White Folk,
Colorblindness is a facet of racism.

Dear White Folk,
Good for you if you have Native American heritage, but you’re still white. Being 1/8th Cherokee or whatever or less doesn’t count. You don’t get to play the “Native American Race Card”.

apihtawikosisan:

hurray-caucasoids:

apihtawikosisan:

hurray-caucasoids:

If you consider racism to be more ‘important’ than the staggering rape statistics in America I will deem you a hopeless, worthless cause.

Because of course, race and sexual assault have nothing to do with one another.  They are hermetically sealed off from one another.

Okay you want to play this game I will bring up how in regards to interracial rape, black men overwhelmingly rape white women. Go ahead and try to explain away reality, you won’t be able to, but honestly I care about all women, who are 49% of the world population. Racism exists outside of America, and any race can hate another.

Go ahead and try to dismiss me or call me a silly white girl, hope you understand how little I care about being called racist, which is your only attack apparently.

“This game” I think pretty much sums up your inability to understand that race and gender intersect. 

Of course a “silly white girl” doesn’t care about being called racist.  Silly white girls do not actually experience systemic racism, and thus it is very easy to dismiss race and pretend that the experiences of white women are the experiences of all women.

It is clear you did not read the link I provided to you, which refers to the number of aboriginal women in Canada who have been raped and murdered because they are aboriginal.  That link also explains how systemic racism has made aboriginal women more vulnerable to such abuse, particularly via endemic, systemic racism within law enforcement agencies who disproportionately focus on white victims while deliberately not investigating the murders and disappearances of native victims.

In fact, this issue is so outrageous that they’ve actually had to launch an inquiry into how badly the police botched investigations related to the mostly native victims.  What is even more sickening is that the inquiry itself has been marred by racism, refusing to give full hearing to officers who worked on these cases who testified to the way in which investigators refused to do their jobs because the women who were missing were nativeThe sexism involved in these issues is very much informed by race.

You may be unaware of these things, and thus making a statement that “violence against women is more important than race” makes sense to you.  But it makes little sense to those of us who experience sexual violence BECAUSE OF OUR RACE.

Nor does your approach in any way show an awareness of how white feminism  ignores the racist impact of colonialism on gender roles in native societies.  You might want to learn more.

Do not pretend to ‘care about all women’ while dismissing how race very much has something to do with the kind of sexualised violence we face as women who are not white.

And yes, I will call you a racist and a white supremacist, as your blog so clearly marks you to be.  Whether you ‘care’ about this or not makes no difference.

(via green-street-politics)

The RCMP killed sled dogs to keep the Inuit in one place.

apihtawikosisan:

In the 50s, when Canada started to want Inuit lands, hundreds of sled dogs were slaughtered.  The killings were deeply shocking to the Inuit who have a very strong relationship with their dogs, and who relied on those dogs to transport food and goods.  Without the dogs, Inuit could not hunt or move around as they had before.  It was a deliberate strategy to ‘settle’ them.

For years the RCMP and Canada have claimed that the dogs were sick and needed to be put down.  These lies, and the violence inherent in the slayings, are slowly coming to official light.

Some Inuit in Nunavik are finally receiving compensation for the slaughter, but of course these paltry sums cannot undo the damage of forced settlement and relocations.  Canada seems to believe that financial compensation obviates any need for real change.

Disgusting, and too little, too late… as usual.

.redeye: Etsy "Native Inspired" Treasuries...

theillustratednerdgirl:

mylittlehyena:

Are really tiring.  It’s tiring to continually see the community of Native Artists on Etsy getting overlooked and unappreciated. 

If you have a favorite Native Etsy shop let me know.  I’ve started to leave comments on the “tribal, southwestern, navajo-aztec, wolf, moon, shaman, indian hat, ethnic, spiritual”, etc treasuries with this:

“If anyone truly enjoys or appreciates Native jewelry and art you should buy from Native people, it would be a tremendous gesture of support.

seeworks
SparkleandBead
BlueRoseRedeye
nativearts
MeaBfly
DreLynnDesign
MiLoProductions
NorthwestBeadwork
n8tivebeadwork
Shyyy
TraditionalNative
Indigenousalaska
Oglalawin
wapazo
WildlyBeadingHearts
ndnchick
crystaltewa
artfromabove

Don’t overlook this (short & incomplete) list of Native Artists!”

List of Native artists on Etsy.

(via badndngirl)

(via october-eightyeight)

"A colonized mind is capable of seeing ONLY the options laid out by the coloniser […] a colonised mind is trained to be held within the limits set by the coloniser […] solutions have to come from decolonized minds that can see beyond the confines established and enforced by the coloniser […] often colonised minds will side with the coloniser against decolonized thinking and action, that is what the colonized are trained to do, that is part of the colonisation process"

Debra White Plume dropping some truth bombs (via selchieproductions)

Much like the Sámedikkit.

(via dolgematki)

(via crankyduojar-deactivated2012073)

Headdresses- And Why They Aren’t Offensive

moniquill:

I know I’m super late to the party on this (I only have Internet at work right now because there’s some bullshit with our service provider). I also know that the OP has declared that they have no fucks to give about the education that’s been laid down before them by the rest of the tumblr NDN community.

But I’m still going to go through this and point out why every single fucking words of this fucking post is fucking awful. For my followers. Because PSA’s are kind of what I do here in between pretty dresses and cute animals.

peppermint-wind:

Wow, people on tumblr have really been annoying the fuck out of me lately, so I guess I’m going to have to use all my pent up anger to finally make a post about this

‘I’m angry at target X so I’m going to address target Y’ is never an encouraging start…

So basically some self-righeous assholes have made the claim and spread the belief that Native American headdresses/Native American inspired fashion is culturally insensitive or wrong.

That would be the entire NDN community on tumblr.

First, let me just say- if you personally believe this and for that reason you do not wear these things, that is totally cool and fine.  Like really.  If that’s your opinion, fine.

How magnanimous of you.

What is not okay, is making others feel bad for wearing Native American fashion when they don’t personally think it’s offensive.  

But here’s where you fall down. Because if someone is hurting me, I am hurt regardless of their awareness or belief that they have done a hurtful thing. That’s not how hurt works.

I am one of those people who doesn’t find it offensive, and before you write me off as a “culturally insensitive asshole who doesn’t know what she’s talking about,”  please hear me out-

No.

You are wrong.

There is no argument about this.

Your opinion here is factually incorrect.

You don’t believe that cultural appropriation is offensive?

That’s wrong.

It is, indeed, offensive. It is hurtful. It is damaging to NDN people and NDN communities.

Your opinion that is is not is counter-factual.

holding an opinion does not make an opinion which is factually incorrect magically correct and/or valid somehow.

if I state that it is my opinion that the moon is entirely made from the compress bodies of g1 my little ponies, I am wrong because that is not true. it is counterfactual.

opinions can be wrong.

Here are some of the arguments people have made, and this is why they’re wrong:

Whenever you prepare arguments without actually quoting people, you’re necessarily building strawmen. Just so you know.

Note: I have cut some bullshit here because it’s not worth responding to in a point by point fashion; you can see it in the original post if you want.

  • “Your ancestors killed them/were inhumane to them.”

-  Yes, some people’s ancestors were.  I don’t see how this is relevant?  Some people’s ancestors were also very cruel to African Americans.  Does that mean we can’t wear African tribal inspired fashion, as well?

Yes. Cultural appropriation is fuckery no matter who you’re appropriating. If specific cultural groups are telling you that it’s not ok to fashionably adopt a specific thing because it’s not just clothes, you are a fucking asshole for doing so.

Some things are just clothes and it’s ok to utilize them in fashion (though even this often comes with a heapin’ helpin’ of racist exoticism, so take it with a grain of salt) but SOME THINGS ARE NOT. For fuck’s sake why do privileged people seem incapable of understanding this very basic fact? That the entire world isn’t yours to have?

I could go on and on with almost every culture and the fashion that originated from it.  The point is, is that almost everything in fashion (especially cultural) can be linked to something tragic.  So if you’re not going to wear Native American inspired fashion, you also shouldn’t be wearing Asian/African/Scottish(that means plaid) inspired clothing.

I could tell you a funny story about Plaid, but I’ll save that for a later post.

But here’s the thing: I’m mostly on board with what you just said. SHOCKING I KNOW, but your attempt at wild hyperbole is actually correct.

YOU SHOULDN’T CULTURALLY APPROPRIATE.

    In conclusion, the whole argument for why “Native American fashion is offensive” does not make any sense.  Every point set forth, can be refuted with a basic knowledge of fashion, history, and understanding.  If you want to actually do anything about things in fashion that are “tragic,” I suggest you stop looking to the past. Instead, start looking at what companies inhumanely treat animals for their fur/skin.  In my opinion, that’s a little more important than whether I want to wear a fucking headdress or not.  Thanks.

You’ve displayed a total lack of comprehension, and that your capacity to give a fuck about hurting others is broken, but I’m going to take a bash at education anyway, because it seems from your posts that you have no idea what the ramifications are or WHY it really is a big deal:

Depictions like this are hurtful.

Dressing up in redface is hurtful. Wearing war bonnets is hurtful. Dressing up as another race by wearing terribly stereotypical caricatures of what you think that race looks like is not appropriate. When you dress up like this and take photos like this it adds one more images to the ponderous pile of this shit that creates the pervasive cultural notion that this is what people should think of when they hear ‘Native American’ , and IT HURTS REAL NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLE. It creates, in the minds of the people that see you dressed like this, a stereotype - a caricature of what Native people do/should look like that erases us in reality and removes us from their perception of the modern world. It turns ‘Native American’ into someone wearing beads and headbands and feathers and face paint. It turns an ethnic, racial identity into a costume.

This is racism.

When you only speak about Native American people in the past tense, in certain contexts. When you only mention them as pertains to White history. When you depict them in stereotypical ways. This is how racist thought is cemented in your mind and the minds of others.

I am tired of cultural appropriation.

I am tired of having to constantly be an educator of people who largely don’t want to be educated. I am tired of being -hurt- by racism. I am tired of people who claim that they love and admire ‘Native American Culture’ but in fact know fuck all about Pan-Indian culture or the fact that ‘Native American’ is a blanket term for hundreds of hugely disparate indigenous nations across two continents and that we do NOT have just one culture.

And before you argue that you didn’t MEAN to be racist or that you were just having fun, before your many white allies rally around you to tell me how wrong I am and what a good person you are and how you are not a racist…know this:

Racism is not in your intent.

Your intent is immaterial in how racist your actions are.

This isn’t about you BEING a racist. It’s about you DOING A THING that is racist.

Your intent doesn’t change it. Your ignorance of its meaning doesn’t change it. It’s got nothing to do with you as a person and everything to do with the meaning of your action in the context of sociocultural history.

Please watch this video.

If you think that dressing up as a stereotype is somehow ‘celebrating’ anyone’s culture, that speaks to some really problematic shit in how you’ve been educated, what you’ve been exposed to, what you think you know about what Native Americans are and what we look like. And while it’s not your fault that the culture of your upbringing has handed you that shit on a silver platter and said ‘eat it’, and not your fault that you did eat it without knowing better, it’s still bullshit and it’s still hurtful. You have the Internet at your disposal. You can become educated as to what Native Americans really are like and what we really are about and why not only is that outfit that you put on not remotely like anything legitimately Native American - but that you CAN’T make a costume that’s legitimately Native American. Because we don’t all look alike. Because we’re people.

Here’s a quick checklist for whether it’s ok to wear a war bonnet:

Was it placed onto your head by an elder/legitimate authority figure from a select number of plains nations because you personally achieved something so great that it is worthy of that kind of honor? (corollary: If yes to the above, are you currently wearing it in an appropriate ceremonial fashion/setting? Like are you at a powwow or speaking with the president?)

If you answered ‘no’ then IT IS NOT OK.

Any more than it would be ok to buy a decorated veteran’s purple heart that he had to pawn and put -that- on for a sexy/edgy/hip photo shoot. It’s that kind of disrespect, on top of the slap in the face that is cultural appropriation in general.

Here’s a quick checklist of when it’s ok to wear a cheapass knockoff war bonnet made from the feathers of Weeping Rainbow Chicken:

Hot Text - http://www.sparklee.com

(via karnythia)