I will never apologize for being fat and wearing clothing that fits to the curves, rolls, flab, and folds of my body.

thebigblackwolfe:

grrlyman:

glitterlion:

(via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

Why white radicals shouldn’t criticize Barack Obama

cosmopolitan-fascist:

quigleygoesdown:

Nobody white can tell me how to feel about Barack Obama. I don’t care if you are a radical…you can’t tell me how the fuck to feel about him. You are white. You know the facts. You don’t know the experience. I know the facts. I know the experience. Barack is my brother. My brother may do horrible things but he is no less my brother for it.

Sometimes when I hear white radicals & revolutionaries criticize Barack I wanna say, “Very true but how about you shut the fuck up for a minute. Let’s talk about genocide & the other 43 presidents.” I’m a Black man. Everytime I see him on TV, I want to shake his hand & hug him & protect him. I want to tell him how beautiful his wife & children are. I want to assure him that he is loved by our people- Black people. I’m so upset with him & his decisions. I’m so upset at the blood on his hands. This is a trail of unfulfilled promises.

I am a revolutionary but my love for President Obama does not betray my politics. I have to defend him. He is a Black man like me & we must defend each other. I will not leave him to the wolves. I will not let him drown without reaching out.

I don’t think I’ll vote for him. I probably won’t even vote. But if I did push that damn button in support of him…I will not recant or repent.

So to my radical white comrades…think about what the fuck you say about Barack Obama. He might not be shit to you….but he is MY brother.

This really speaks to me.

As a ‘radical’, and an undocumented immigrant from a nation that is being drone-striked and destroyed by Obama’s policies, I do not support much of what he has done and do not think establishment politics offer any solutions for the real problems of our society.

Yet when I see white leftists just trash talking Obama over his corporatism or his foreign policy (without necessarily being victims of these processes), itsinfuriatingto me.

I’ve had a lot of people leave me messages about how I’m an Obama sympathizer because I reblog pictures of Michelle or Barack being cute and charismatic. I don’t agree with the institution of the Presidency or what Obama has done in many cases, and HATE liberals who defend him without looking at facts— but when I want that Grant Park speech I am near tears. He has a special place in the hearts of many many many people of color, he has a sincerity and down-to-earthness that completely baffles me when I hear that he orders the deaths of US citizens or deported 1 mil immigrants.

It’s a tough place to be, certainly, but if you are a person of color and you see how he is ripped apart for the stupidest things in the worst ways possible— attacked for nothing more than being a Black man. We live in a very contentious political moment but I promise you the Republicans would not be this crazy if he wasn’t  Black.

All this is to say is that there are great and legitimate and important criticisms of Obama, and no one should use his cult of personality as an excuse for the lives that have been destroyed by the US and by his policies. There’s no good answer but white radicals need to understand how conflicted many people of color are with his presidency, and respect that before they go blathering on and on about him being the sum of all evil.

(via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

Brown Silence

tranqualizer:

blackgirldangerous:

by Janani Balasubramanian

It was Pride again this weekend. I spent this one in Seattle, a new city for me.  Naturally this meant I called up some queer friends and spent most of my days trying to find as many shenanigans as possible that didn’t involve dancing to Lady Gaga. I was happy to be in an unfamiliar place because it meant I spent more time listening to other people tell me about their home, to their stories about artmaking and organizing and queer politics in Seattle.  It is rare that I get an excuse to be quiet for as long as I was and just take it all in.  At Dyke March on Saturday afternoon, I had a moment where I realized how nice it was to be just dancing up the street, all queered up for the occasion, but without a megaphone and chants in hand.  While Pride has its faults, which include its absurd degree of corporatization and white cis gay male dominance, I still appreciated it.  See, I needed the reminder that celebration is an ok and necessary part of changemaking, that sometimes I can be in a huge crowd and allow myself to disappear right into it, that I can set my voice aside for a while.

I’m a poet, an activist, and a scholar.  A lot of my life revolves around words.  I regularly use “dialoging” as a verb. Activism tends to be a particularly loud and prolific thing for me, a space where I willingly allow ideas to be drained from me and sent into the world with the hopes that they will go on to settle in other bodies, and start making some change. I like writing about race, talking about race, thinking about race.  It’s how I get by; it’s something to live for.  I am lucky that in some ways building racial justice is my job.  But here’s the kick.  Race, unlike say, investment banking, is in the air we breathe and the communities we circulate in.  It is not something I can set down after a day of “working on it”.  I encounter race and racism by living. 

I am frequently sought out at parties and in other social situations, including online, for my perspective as an anti-racist activist (or in the most tokenizing cases, as a POC).  This is most likely to happen when I’m in majority white spaces.  I then find myself explaining how the issue at hand—anything from organic food to capitalism to yoga—is racialized, and perhaps what other systems of oppression are at play.  Sometimes these conversations are generative, and I learn a great deal from them.  But usually, I just leave them feeling drained, having learned nothing myself and unsure of whether my words have sunk in or done any authentic educating.  Mostly these conversations just make me tired.  

I am not a loud person.  This surprises many people who only know me through my work, and not personally.  When those folks observe me not speaking in social spaces, they often ask if I’m all right.  I want to tell them I am more than all right, that I am so grateful to be inward-facing for a while.  Scholar-activist me has a strong voice and is highly politicized.  In private I enjoy stillness and contemplation and listening much more.  I am grateful, then, that art and activism have helped me hone and deploy my voice.  But I am also wary of the days when it feels like words are being extracted from me without my consent.

It’s been a few months since Mia published her post on white silence, where she calls out white folks who tend to disengage from race on Facebook and through other channels. It is symptomatic of privilege to be able to avoid those conversations in this way; marginalized people do not have that option.  But maybe we—marginalized people—do have the option to stay quiet sometimes, and maybe this silence is deeply necessary.  It doesn’t have to be a silence that undergirds privilege; instead it can do the background work of healing us.  Not everyone’s education needs to be our responsibility all the time.  It is a magnificent and humble act to recognize when talking, or otherwise creating more words, will not do any good. Our words are powerful, especially because they come from the margins, but their power can fade when not used strategically.  Our words and energy should also be conserved.  Besides, it’s a capitalist logic that tells us to always orient ourselves towards output.  Sometimes, there are no more words left in my body and I shouldn’t demand of myself to produce more.  When this happens, the greatest kindness my friends can give me is to let me sit and be silent with them.  Sometimes, those of us who have grown used to giving of ourselves and our ideas need time to soak in our own beings, and work on our own liberation.  Sometimes silence is our only safe space, and we deserve more of it than we offer ourselves. 

Like Black Girl Dangerous? Want to support the voices of queer, trans*, and gender-non-conforming writers of color? Go HERE!!!!!

Janani is a queer South Asian poet-activist-scholar, and an advocate for a peaceful food system.  They study climate change, race, and queer studies. Their poetry can be found at jananiwritesthings.posterous.com or jananiwritesthings.tumblr.com.

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yes yes yes

 Besides, it’s a capitalist logic that tells us to always orient ourselves towards output.  ”

Resources and support groups for LGBTQ Muslims

themindislimitless:

amillionexpectations:

On tumblr:

  • Queer Muslims - A space for queer Muslims to connect, express themselves and share resources. (A real treasure trove of articles, links and book reviews). 
  • I am not Haraam project - a blog for LGBTQ Muslims to celebrate their identities and share their experiences.

Source: the website of the Safra project based in the UK. The full list (which also includes resources not solely targeted at Muslims can be found by clicking here.) However, below is a list of the resources specifically targeted to Muslims.

  • Imaan - UK based
    A social support group for Muslim lesbian, gays, bisexuals, transgender, those questioning their sexuality or gender identity and their friends and supporters.
    Website: http://www.imaan.org.uk/ 
     
  • Safra Project- UK based
    A Resource Project working on issues relating to lesbian, bisexual. trans, queer and questioning women who identify as Muslim religiously and/or culturally.

    E-mail: info@safraproject.org
    Website: http://www.safraproject.org

    Listserve-dealing with issues concerning lesbian, bisexual and transgender women that identify as Muslim religiously or culturally.
     
  • Safra Project Social Group- meets monthly in the UK, check website events notice for dates and venues.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/safra_project/ 
     
  • Salaam Canada
    ‘Salaam: Queer Muslim community’ is a Muslim Identified Organization dedicated to social justice, peace and human dignity through its work to bring all closer to a world that is free from injustice, including prejudice, discrimination, racism, misogyny, sexism and homophobia.
    http://www.salaamcanada.com/ 
     
  • The Inner Circle
    The Inner Circle strives to reconcile sexuality and faith, and foster friendship through a positive peer group for gay, lesbian, transgendered and other sexually marginalized persons particularly of the Muslim community, as well as persons of other religions or cultures who experience similar or related challenges, and all those who support our aims.
    They provide information through news/events, articles, discussions and life-orientation. They also have experts and qualified voluntary workers to deal with your queries and counseling, assisting individuals in reconciling their faith with their sexuality and dealing with other sexually related issues.http://www.theinnercircle.org.za/ 
     
  • BiMuslims 
    An email discussion group for Muslims who identify as bisexual or who may be questioning their sexual orientation. Anything relevant to the bisexual Muslim community can be discussed on this forum. It is intended to be a safe space for Muslims who are bisexual and who want tomeet other Muslims who are also bisexual.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BiMuslims 
     
  • Muslim Gay Men
    MuslimGayMen is a group for Muslim gay men and their friends and allies.
    http://www.yahoogroups.com/list/muslimgaymen 
     
  • Partners of LGBT Muslims
    To bring non-Muslim partners (who are in relationships with Muslims) together to discuss issues of common concern.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PartnersOfLGBTMuslims
  • TransMuslims (need Yahoo sign in)
    An email discussion group for Muslims who identify as transgender, and for those that consider themselves gender variant. This includes anyone that identifies as an MTF (male to female) or an FTM (female to male). Issues of relevance to the Trans Muslim community are welcome on this list, including gender identity, issues of gender socialization in Islam, sex reassignment surgery, and Islam’s views towards transgendered people.
    http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/TransMuslims
  • Queer Jihad
    A web site devoted to the needs of GLBT Muslims. Website:http://www.well.com/user/queerjhd/
  • Queer Muslims
    Resources for GLBT Muslims. Has information about Islam and Transsexuals.
    http://www.angelfire.com/ca2/queermuslims

This needs a LOT more notes. Signal boost this people. This is important.

(via green-street-politics)

Anonymous asked: Right. Because people on Tumblr create POC problems, and they haven’t existed for years, just like there are problems that exist among any minority. No, people on tumblr should contribute to these problems. But you also contribute to racial problems by placing people of colour above anybody and everybody else. While it is not to be expected to actually happen, ALL people should treat every person of ever race equally. And you, a supporter and activist of the rights and proper treatment of POC,

poemsofthedead:

navigatethestream:

continued: should be aware of this. You should not be promoting one race above another. Because all people, including POC are beautiful. And all, especially POC have had their hardships and trails and misfortune. And yes, racism against POC does still exist, and very unfortunately it probably will. But racism (which, by the way, does exist among ALL people) is nothing more than stupidity imbedded in the human brain. And you, dear, have been quite racist.


wow, the sheer unadulterated ignorance of this ask is really blowing me right now. its too late at night for me to be responding to this type of bullshit. but i got time on my hands and a smoothie in my glass so i’m going to indulge you here. 

People on tumblr do create a lot of problems for POC. anytime we attempt to have an ingroup conversation about POC issues and white people butt in talking shit about how “they are a good white person and not all of us are like this and why do brown people hate us so much OMG i thought i sang my kumbayaahs loud enough during black history month and quoted MLK at the right times so please POC stop reminding me of your daily realities” then yes, you are causing problems because you are effectively making a conversation about racism about you and your hurt feelings. 

anytime people dismiss our thoughts on the racism we experience, tell us that we are being “too angry” or “too mean” to the white people or self loathing POC who perpetuate white supremacy, then you’re causing us problems. 

anytime we call people out on their shit and they drop the “reverse racism” card {cause yes yes y’all, reverse racism has a hell of a credit limit and its fucking higher than mine} then you’re causing POC problems.

any time white people come to people of color and say “please teach me how to be a good white person! teach me the ways so you’ll accept me and like me again” then you’re calling POC problems as if y’all motherfuckers are incapable of reading, researching, and teaching you gotdamn selves! 

and anytime when folk respond to us with racist slurs about how we are nothing but n******, c*****, telling us we should die, and other colorful epithets back to back to back then yes you are causing POC hella problems. 

i am fortunate enough to not attract those kind of people to my blog. for some odd reason i tend to get asks like this where ignant folks wanna wax philosophical. but i do witness a lot of the never ending vitrolic shit that people who i follow and care about receive in their asks boxes for doing nothing but preaching from the trap! speaking their truth and refusing to put some glitter on it and stamp that sucker in a Hallmark envelope. and yet through it all they still have to hold it together, try to not fall to pieces, go about their daily lives knowing people are willing to dehumanize them with no fucks given in the game, and Tumblr staff is fundamentally unwilling to do anything about it under the guise of “free speech”.  

and when i see that shit, then yes i rightfully call that “causing POCs problems”. 

cause honestly, in your twisted world view what in all mighty hell would you describe it as?! 

and i don’t know if you’ve realized this but i’m going to clue you in on something

are you ready?

ready?

okay

I

AM

BLACK. let me spell it out for you- B.L.A.C.K! 

if i didn’t prioritize people of color above say…white people, than nobody else would. even at your anti-racist best, POC and our issues tend to get a passing glance when it comes to social justice issues until the next cause comes along. 

if i didn’t prioritize people of colour above white people, then people would continue to tokenize us in social justice movements/political campaigns while simultaneously telling us to shut up about slavery, rape, genocide, colonialism, imperialism, and racism amongst the many other things people of colour experience.

if i didn’t prioritize people of colour, then y’all would continue to white wash our history/leaders/famous folk while dancing on the ballroom floor of post racialism. 

if i didn’t prioritize people of color over white people, then i would be complacent in perpetuating a white supremacist power structure that has successfully plagued our government, entertainment sphere, education, and many more aspects of life in which whiteness is given the VIP pass for no better reason than existing. 

with that being said, how dare you, as a white person, come into my askbox and tell me how to engage in the struggle for “racial equality”. how dare you chalk up my experiences with racism to “stupidity that is embedded in the human brain”. how dare you tell me i am contributing to the problem by “placing  people of colour above everybody and anybody else”. how dare you chalk up the experiences of other people to “hardships, trails, and misfortunes” as if this is some Days of Our Lives type shit. and how dare you tell me about racism as if you’ve got the magic stick. 

who the fuck are you to be telling POC how to live and how to act. 

who the fuck are you to be telling POC what is and what isn’t. 

who the fuck are you to be telling me that i am part of the problem

the fact that i just wasted my time writing this ask knowing it’ll probably fly right over your head is the exact problem i was talking about from jump street.

take your ignant ass and go stargaze from outside! 


SubhanAllah… how did I miss this? For real? White Muslims? Just cuz you Muslim does not mean you don’t need to back the fuck up with your whiteness-we’re-all-one bullshit.

(via defeatmenot)

seriouslyamerica:

ceasesilence:

bubbybobble:

queerandpresentdanger:


“I got  married, I came out publicly. But I had to, you know? I mean it was like  gays can get married, yay! Prop 8, I’m a second-class citizen, what the  fuck?! As a black woman, I’m really low on the chain, but as a GAY  black woman, I’m even lower! There are so many things I’ve had to do as a  gay person that I don’t have to do as a black person. I didn’t have to  come out black to my parents. Can you imagine that? ‘Mom, Dad, I need to  talk to you about something. I just want to tell you, I’m black.’  ‘What?!’  ‘I’m black, that’s just the way it is.’ ‘Oh Lord, oh, anything  but black! Give her cancer Lord! Anything but black! You know what,  you’ve been hanging around black people too much. And they got you  thinking you black.’ ‘No Ma, it’s just the way I am, I was born this  way.’ ‘Oh, don’t give me that! The bible says Adam and Eve, not Adam and  Mary J. Blige!’ ‘I’m sorry, It’s just how I am.’ ‘What did I do? What  did I do? I let you watch Soul Train! Was it Soul Train?’ ‘No Ma, it  wasn’t Soul Train…’
— Wanda Sykes


(via nowmybutthurts)

seriouslyamerica:

ceasesilence:

bubbybobble:

queerandpresentdanger:

“I got married, I came out publicly. But I had to, you know? I mean it was like gays can get married, yay! Prop 8, I’m a second-class citizen, what the fuck?! As a black woman, I’m really low on the chain, but as a GAY black woman, I’m even lower! There are so many things I’ve had to do as a gay person that I don’t have to do as a black person. I didn’t have to come out black to my parents. Can you imagine that? ‘Mom, Dad, I need to talk to you about something. I just want to tell you, I’m black.’ ‘What?!’ ‘I’m black, that’s just the way it is.’ ‘Oh Lord, oh, anything but black! Give her cancer Lord! Anything but black! You know what, you’ve been hanging around black people too much. And they got you thinking you black.’ ‘No Ma, it’s just the way I am, I was born this way.’ ‘Oh, don’t give me that! The bible says Adam and Eve, not Adam and Mary J. Blige!’ ‘I’m sorry, It’s just how I am.’ ‘What did I do? What did I do? I let you watch Soul Train! Was it Soul Train?’ ‘No Ma, it wasn’t Soul Train…’

— Wanda Sykes

(via nowmybutthurts)