Why are there pride months and shit

queernonywolf:

Because society deems you, cisgender straight white folks, as the norm, you don’t need to feel pride. You’re already experiencing it!

Oppression, societally and institutionally, has beaten us down so much that we are so “bad” and “wrong” and “ugly” by your standards that the sheer fact we want to take pride in the fact we are whatever we are [I say this in means to be like, no matter it’s Black history month, Gay Pride, Native American Heritage Month, etc] is in and of itself a revolutionary act.

These “months” and “parades” are not federally recognized or like “enforced” in any sense of the word. The ONLY recognized holiday that could conceivably be not white heterocis-centric is Martin Luther King Jr. Day and THAT IS ALL.

These months have very little power OVER YOU. It’s FOR US. Because we have a DIRE NEED to feel pride.

(Source: dansphalluspalace)

I will never apologize for being fat and wearing clothing that fits to the curves, rolls, flab, and folds of my body.

thebigblackwolfe:

grrlyman:

glitterlion:

(Source: doctorlewis, via fsufeministalumna)

the first South Asian LGBTQ hotline has been launched to help gay South Asians/Desi youths and their families.

deafmuslimpunx:

Salaams.

This has already been launched on October 11. Please repost widely to the South Asian/Desi community in your area. Dhanyavad.

————————————————-

Announcing the Launch of DeQH!

a Desi lgbtQ Helpline

On National Coming Out Day, Thursday, October 11th, 2012, a coalition of South Asian lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) organizations and individuals in the U.S. will launch DeQH, the first South Asian LGBTQ national helpline.

DeQH offers free, confidential, culturally sensitive peer support, information and resources by telephone for LGBTQ South Asian individuals, families and friends around the globe. The intent is to provide a safe and supportive ear for callers to share their concerns, questions, struggles or hopes through conversations with trained LGBTQ South Asian Peer Support Volunteers.

Callers can reach the helpline at (908) FOR-DEQH (908-367-3374 8pm-10pm on Thursdays and Sundays, Eastern Standard Time [5-7pm PST].  Days and times will expand over time.

For general information, check out www.deqh.org and contact deqh.info (at) gmail.com.

DeQH is a collaboration of South Asian LGBTQ groups and individuals around the nation including AQUA North Carolina, Hotpot! in Philadelphia, SALGA NYC, Satrang in LA, and Trikone San Francisco. Please contact us if your group is interested in joining our effort, and/or if you are interested in becoming a general volunteer or would like to be trained as a peer support volunteer.

DeQH operates with support from NQAPIA. Trikone is a fiscal sponsor of DeQH.

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista, via queerthanks)

venomousfeminist:

“Chicken” - Catherine Opie

venomousfeminist:

“Chicken” - Catherine Opie

(Source: , via sulk-king)

wretchedoftheearth:

jassonhiramperez:

fyeahqueermusic:

Here are The Lost Bois, killer queer hip-hop out of D.C. They’re doing their best to straddle the line between super political rap and riot grrl/queercore and succeeding quite well.
The Lost Bois make some great music. The beats are simple and catchy, designed to worm their way right to your brain and stick there. Not too much remarkable about them, but they’re effective and provide a great base for Lost Boi’s amazing rhymes. They address all manner of cultural and societal topics with a sense of humor and tongue in cheek tone that really reminds me of riot grrrl. In the song “The Race” B. Steady raps “I don’t look like Ellen, but some brown folks are gay too/Not The L Word, Tyler Perry, I am not Alicia Keys/My friend my life is not the chick they’re showing on TV.” It’s amazing. Spinning pop culture references with sharp political commentary, that’s pretty much my idea of perfect lyrical content.
And on top of all that, they’re pretty DIY, making their own videos and music. Really, what’s not to love?
Check ‘em out:http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Lost-Bois/200120236041http://www.youtube.com/user/QueerBGirl

wretchedoftheearth:

jassonhiramperez:

fyeahqueermusic:

Here are The Lost Bois, killer queer hip-hop out of D.C. They’re doing their best to straddle the line between super political rap and riot grrl/queercore and succeeding quite well.

The Lost Bois make some great music. The beats are simple and catchy, designed to worm their way right to your brain and stick there. Not too much remarkable about them, but they’re effective and provide a great base for Lost Boi’s amazing rhymes. They address all manner of cultural and societal topics with a sense of humor and tongue in cheek tone that really reminds me of riot grrrl. In the song “The Race” B. Steady raps “I don’t look like Ellen, but some brown folks are gay too/Not The L Word, Tyler Perry, I am not Alicia Keys/My friend my life is not the chick they’re showing on TV.” It’s amazing. Spinning pop culture references with sharp political commentary, that’s pretty much my idea of perfect lyrical content.

And on top of all that, they’re pretty DIY, making their own videos and music. Really, what’s not to love?

Check ‘em out:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Lost-Bois/200120236041
http://www.youtube.com/user/QueerBGirl

Brown Silence

tranqualizer:

blackgirldangerous:

by Janani Balasubramanian

It was Pride again this weekend. I spent this one in Seattle, a new city for me.  Naturally this meant I called up some queer friends and spent most of my days trying to find as many shenanigans as possible that didn’t involve dancing to Lady Gaga. I was happy to be in an unfamiliar place because it meant I spent more time listening to other people tell me about their home, to their stories about artmaking and organizing and queer politics in Seattle.  It is rare that I get an excuse to be quiet for as long as I was and just take it all in.  At Dyke March on Saturday afternoon, I had a moment where I realized how nice it was to be just dancing up the street, all queered up for the occasion, but without a megaphone and chants in hand.  While Pride has its faults, which include its absurd degree of corporatization and white cis gay male dominance, I still appreciated it.  See, I needed the reminder that celebration is an ok and necessary part of changemaking, that sometimes I can be in a huge crowd and allow myself to disappear right into it, that I can set my voice aside for a while.

I’m a poet, an activist, and a scholar.  A lot of my life revolves around words.  I regularly use “dialoging” as a verb. Activism tends to be a particularly loud and prolific thing for me, a space where I willingly allow ideas to be drained from me and sent into the world with the hopes that they will go on to settle in other bodies, and start making some change. I like writing about race, talking about race, thinking about race.  It’s how I get by; it’s something to live for.  I am lucky that in some ways building racial justice is my job.  But here’s the kick.  Race, unlike say, investment banking, is in the air we breathe and the communities we circulate in.  It is not something I can set down after a day of “working on it”.  I encounter race and racism by living. 

I am frequently sought out at parties and in other social situations, including online, for my perspective as an anti-racist activist (or in the most tokenizing cases, as a POC).  This is most likely to happen when I’m in majority white spaces.  I then find myself explaining how the issue at hand—anything from organic food to capitalism to yoga—is racialized, and perhaps what other systems of oppression are at play.  Sometimes these conversations are generative, and I learn a great deal from them.  But usually, I just leave them feeling drained, having learned nothing myself and unsure of whether my words have sunk in or done any authentic educating.  Mostly these conversations just make me tired.  

I am not a loud person.  This surprises many people who only know me through my work, and not personally.  When those folks observe me not speaking in social spaces, they often ask if I’m all right.  I want to tell them I am more than all right, that I am so grateful to be inward-facing for a while.  Scholar-activist me has a strong voice and is highly politicized.  In private I enjoy stillness and contemplation and listening much more.  I am grateful, then, that art and activism have helped me hone and deploy my voice.  But I am also wary of the days when it feels like words are being extracted from me without my consent.

It’s been a few months since Mia published her post on white silence, where she calls out white folks who tend to disengage from race on Facebook and through other channels. It is symptomatic of privilege to be able to avoid those conversations in this way; marginalized people do not have that option.  But maybe we—marginalized people—do have the option to stay quiet sometimes, and maybe this silence is deeply necessary.  It doesn’t have to be a silence that undergirds privilege; instead it can do the background work of healing us.  Not everyone’s education needs to be our responsibility all the time.  It is a magnificent and humble act to recognize when talking, or otherwise creating more words, will not do any good. Our words are powerful, especially because they come from the margins, but their power can fade when not used strategically.  Our words and energy should also be conserved.  Besides, it’s a capitalist logic that tells us to always orient ourselves towards output.  Sometimes, there are no more words left in my body and I shouldn’t demand of myself to produce more.  When this happens, the greatest kindness my friends can give me is to let me sit and be silent with them.  Sometimes, those of us who have grown used to giving of ourselves and our ideas need time to soak in our own beings, and work on our own liberation.  Sometimes silence is our only safe space, and we deserve more of it than we offer ourselves. 

Like Black Girl Dangerous? Want to support the voices of queer, trans*, and gender-non-conforming writers of color? Go HERE!!!!!

Janani is a queer South Asian poet-activist-scholar, and an advocate for a peaceful food system.  They study climate change, race, and queer studies. Their poetry can be found at jananiwritesthings.posterous.com or jananiwritesthings.tumblr.com.

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yes yes yes

 Besides, it’s a capitalist logic that tells us to always orient ourselves towards output.  ”

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

June 28, 1969 - The Stonewall Rebellion begins as queer street youth fight back against police in New York’s Greenwich Village.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

June 28, 1969 - The Stonewall Rebellion begins as queer street youth fight back against police in New York’s Greenwich Village.

Resources and support groups for LGBTQ Muslims

themindislimitless:

amillionexpectations:

On tumblr:

  • Queer Muslims - A space for queer Muslims to connect, express themselves and share resources. (A real treasure trove of articles, links and book reviews). 
  • I am not Haraam project - a blog for LGBTQ Muslims to celebrate their identities and share their experiences.

Source: the website of the Safra project based in the UK. The full list (which also includes resources not solely targeted at Muslims can be found by clicking here.) However, below is a list of the resources specifically targeted to Muslims.

  • Imaan - UK based
    A social support group for Muslim lesbian, gays, bisexuals, transgender, those questioning their sexuality or gender identity and their friends and supporters.
    Website: http://www.imaan.org.uk/ 
     
  • Safra Project- UK based
    A Resource Project working on issues relating to lesbian, bisexual. trans, queer and questioning women who identify as Muslim religiously and/or culturally.

    E-mail: info@safraproject.org
    Website: http://www.safraproject.org

    Listserve-dealing with issues concerning lesbian, bisexual and transgender women that identify as Muslim religiously or culturally.
     
  • Safra Project Social Group- meets monthly in the UK, check website events notice for dates and venues.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/safra_project/ 
     
  • Salaam Canada
    ‘Salaam: Queer Muslim community’ is a Muslim Identified Organization dedicated to social justice, peace and human dignity through its work to bring all closer to a world that is free from injustice, including prejudice, discrimination, racism, misogyny, sexism and homophobia.
    http://www.salaamcanada.com/ 
     
  • The Inner Circle
    The Inner Circle strives to reconcile sexuality and faith, and foster friendship through a positive peer group for gay, lesbian, transgendered and other sexually marginalized persons particularly of the Muslim community, as well as persons of other religions or cultures who experience similar or related challenges, and all those who support our aims.
    They provide information through news/events, articles, discussions and life-orientation. They also have experts and qualified voluntary workers to deal with your queries and counseling, assisting individuals in reconciling their faith with their sexuality and dealing with other sexually related issues.http://www.theinnercircle.org.za/ 
     
  • BiMuslims 
    An email discussion group for Muslims who identify as bisexual or who may be questioning their sexual orientation. Anything relevant to the bisexual Muslim community can be discussed on this forum. It is intended to be a safe space for Muslims who are bisexual and who want tomeet other Muslims who are also bisexual.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BiMuslims 
     
  • Muslim Gay Men
    MuslimGayMen is a group for Muslim gay men and their friends and allies.
    http://www.yahoogroups.com/list/muslimgaymen 
     
  • Partners of LGBT Muslims
    To bring non-Muslim partners (who are in relationships with Muslims) together to discuss issues of common concern.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PartnersOfLGBTMuslims
  • TransMuslims (need Yahoo sign in)
    An email discussion group for Muslims who identify as transgender, and for those that consider themselves gender variant. This includes anyone that identifies as an MTF (male to female) or an FTM (female to male). Issues of relevance to the Trans Muslim community are welcome on this list, including gender identity, issues of gender socialization in Islam, sex reassignment surgery, and Islam’s views towards transgendered people.
    http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/TransMuslims
  • Queer Jihad
    A web site devoted to the needs of GLBT Muslims. Website:http://www.well.com/user/queerjhd/
  • Queer Muslims
    Resources for GLBT Muslims. Has information about Islam and Transsexuals.
    http://www.angelfire.com/ca2/queermuslims

This needs a LOT more notes. Signal boost this people. This is important.

(via green-street-politics)

myqueertestimony:

Testimony by ARNAB BANERJI (www.asaap.ca)

About the Project:

“Colour Me Queer” is an community-based photography project conceptualized by prominent Queer activist and Photographer Arnab Banerji with stories from queer-identified community models. Organized in partnership with ASAAP, this project recognizes the role of pride, shame, self-esteem and body politics in how we negotiate sex and interact with partners. Personal stories of pride, resilience and love from South Asian queer-identified models are depicted through narrative and photographed by Arnab.

(Source: thepublicstudio, via kartari)

fracturedrefuge:

queerandpheasantstranger:

kharismatickayteh:


Straight people apparently aren’t invited to the party.


Even Google fucking gets it.


*fistbumps Google*

fracturedrefuge:

queerandpheasantstranger:

kharismatickayteh:

PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket

Straight people apparently aren’t invited to the party.

Even Google fucking gets it.

*fistbumps Google*

(Source: stankleyarchive, via whatfreshhellisthis)

Ignorance (is a poor excuse)

biyuti:

So that thread going on about cis people being ignorant of what ‘cis’ means and generally not knowing all the ‘politically correct’ things. And that we should be polite and forgiving, I guess if someone is using the wrong language or whatever.

There is a reason why focusing on impacts, rather than intent, is important. To use an analogy that I think Riley has before…

If you are standing on my neck, but don’t know, it doesn’t actually change the fact that you are standing on my neck. 

If I ask (or tell) you to get off my neck, responding with, “I didn’t know I was standing on your neck!” as you continue to stand on my neck doesn’t actually change shit. 

If I ask, perhaps with some amount of anger, you to get the fuck off my neck, responding with, “Well, if you said please, I’d get off but you are being rude,” WHILE STILL STANDING ON MY FUCKING NECK.

If, while standing on my neck, you finally hear my chocking and gasping breath, you say, “It appears I’m standing on your neck, maybe you could share your experience with me,” but not actually getting off my neck. 

Tell me. At what point is it okay for me to blame you for standing on my neck? Why do you even think I care about why you are doing it? I don’t. 

All I want is to breath and live, BUT YOU ARE STANDING ON MY FUCKING NECK!

I don’t care that you didn’t know. I don’t care that there may have been some magic word that would elicit your cooperation. I don’t care if you just want to learn. 

I don’t care why someone is oppressing me. Don’t care and I don’t want to hear it. 

Because you never fucking get it: all I want to do is live and breath but all I can see is your fucking foot on my throat. Maybe get the fuck off and maybe I’ll start caring about why you were doing it. 

(Source: biyuti, via moniquill)

entangledroots:

Entangled Roots Patch Giveaway!
Enter to win a grab bag of random patches from above! It’s going to be a surprise!
Reblog this post as many times as you want! The more times you reblog, the more probability you have of winning. We’ll randomly chose a winner and then contact you through tumblr.
The winner will be announced on May 12th.

entangledroots:

Entangled Roots Patch Giveaway!

Enter to win a grab bag of random patches from above! It’s going to be a surprise!

Reblog this post as many times as you want! The more times you reblog, the more probability you have of winning. We’ll randomly chose a winner and then contact you through tumblr.

The winner will be announced on May 12th.

(via entangledrootspress)

HEY GUESS WHAT

clairebearstare:

IT’S ACTUALLY A RADICAL POLITICAL STATEMENT THAT I WAKE UP EVERY FUCKING DAY IN THIS GODFORSAKEN, PATRIARCHAL, WHITE-SUPREMEST WORLD AND DECIDE TO PUT ON LASHBLAST WATERPROOF MASCARA AND A PUSHUP BRA. NO MATTER HOW MANY TIMES WHITE CIS-MEN SEXUALLY HARASS ME FROM THEIR CARS, NO MATTER HOW MANY TIMES WHAT I WEAR MAKES ME INVISIBLE TO THE QUEER COMMUNITY, NO MATTER HOW MANY TIMES I FEEL OBJECTIFIED BY A STRANGER, I STILL WEAR ALL THE LINGERIE I WANT AND TAKE ALL THE TIME I NEED WITH MY HAIR STRAIGHTENER. ALL OF THESE THINGS MAKE ME EXTREMELY BADASS, AND ALL OF THESE DECISIONS ARE NOT ACCIDENTS. IT IS A RECLAMATION AND IT IS NOT EASY.

STOP UNDERESTIMATING ME.

(Source: claire-adactyl, via roropcoldchain)

FACT: When a gay man has anal sex rainbows come out of their unicorn’s ass.

homorobotica:

factsaboutqueers:

Upon becoming a registered gay man you are assigned a unicorn. 

jealous.