whitecolonialism:

December 17, 1944: Internment of Japanese-Americans Comes to an End.

On December 17th, 1944 the United States under the direction of U.S. Major General Henry C. Pratt issued Public Proclamation No. 21 stating that on January 2nd, 1945 all Japanese-Americans “evacuees” from the West Coast could return back to their homes.

The internment of Japanese-Americans began exactly ten weeks after the Empire of Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which gave authorization for the removal of any or all people from military areas. As a result the military defined the entire West Coast, home to a majority of Japanese-Americans as military area. Within a couple of months over 110,000 Japanese-Americans were relocated to internment camps built by the US military scattered all over the nation. For the next two years Japanese-Americans would live under dire living conditions and at times abuse from their military guards.

Throughout World War II ten people were found to be spies for the Empire of Japan, not one of them was of Japanese ancestry. Forty-four year would pass until Ronald Reagan and the United States made an official apology to the surviving Japanese-Americans who were relocated, and were given $20,000 tax-free.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

Mosin Nagant M44

A shorter carbine version of the longer Mosin Nagant 91/30. Unlike the earlier carbine model, the M38, the M44 has a side-folding non-removable spike bayonet. This feature would later become integrated with the SKS, albeit as an under-folding bayonet. The M44 gets it’s designation from the year it entered service, 1944, but there were some produced in 1943, which are generally more collectable and cost a bit more.

(Source: gunrunnerhell)

7.92x57mm

More commonly known as 8mm Mauser. The ones in the picture are Turkish. You can see the “sickle & star” emblem on the headstamp in the third picture. Most of the surplus 8mm Mauser supply has dried up since very few if any nations still use the caliber for their military. 

(Source: gunrunnerhell)

collective-history:

Soon-to-be Japanese American internees disembarking at Lone Pine.

collective-history:

Soon-to-be Japanese American internees disembarking at Lone Pine.

(via lovesurvives)

gunrunnerhell:

Sniper march… (Female Soviet soldiers on the march with their Mosin Nagan 91/30 rifles. Note that some of them are equipped with the PU scope, whereas others are not.)

gunrunnerhell:

Sniper march… (Female Soviet soldiers on the march with their Mosin Nagan 91/30 rifles. Note that some of them are equipped with the PU scope, whereas others are not.)

walkablebuffalo:

ROKS-2/3
A Soviet World War II portable flamethrower, it was designed so to not draw attention (as people apparently didn’t like getting burned alive), so the flamethrower itself was made to look like a service rifle and the square fuel tank resemble a regular backpack. The ROKS-3 however had a more standard cylindrical backpack. Despite it’s unique properties it was only used for a brief period from approximately 1935-1945.

(Source: walkablebuffal0, via fuckyeahsovietrussia)

(Source: aholyroman)

simply-war:

Nazi propaganda photo depicts friendship between an “Aryan” and a black woman. The caption states: “The result! A loss of racial pride.” Germany, prewar.

— US Holocaust Memorial Museum

simply-war:

Nazi propaganda photo depicts friendship between an “Aryan” and a black woman. The caption states: “The result! A loss of racial pride.” Germany, prewar.

— US Holocaust Memorial Museum

inmaledress:

I’m very much on a women re-enacting kick- ass Russian women of WWII today it seems
driftingfocus:

(via DSC_3745 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

inmaledress:

I’m very much on a women re-enacting kick- ass Russian women of WWII today it seems

driftingfocus:

(via DSC_3745 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

inmaledress:

dailyreenactor:

IMG_6890.jpg on Flickr.

inmaledress:

dailyreenactor:

IMG_6890.jpg on Flickr.


Armed labourers of the tractor plant “Red October” (Krasny Oktyabr) during the Battle of Stalingrad, autumn 1942.

Armed labourers of the tractor plant “Red October” (Krasny Oktyabr) during the Battle of Stalingrad, autumn 1942.

(via ppsh-41)

(Source: , via asianhistory)

simply-war:

 WWII African American soldier. Photo Courtesy of Still Picture Branch (NNSP) of the National Archives and Records Administration.

simply-war:

 WWII African American soldier. Photo Courtesy of Still Picture Branch (NNSP) of the National Archives and Records Administration.

severelackofimagination:


Pavlovs house; Stalingrad. Marked as a “fortress” on German maps.
Named after Sergeant Yakov Pavlov, initially with a 30 man squad this building was taken from the Germans, post capture, only 4 of the squad remained alive, Sgt Pavlov being most senior. Taking Stalin’s “not one step back” order for what it was, Sgt Pavlov quickly organised the defence of this building. Land mines, barbed wire, machine guns and anti tank guns were set up. Within days of the buildings capture, Soviet reinforcements arrived, boosting troop numbers to 25.
For 2 months straight post capture, Pavlov and his men defended this building from daily German attacks, towards the end, it was said that Pavlov and his men had to run out into the square to kick over the piles of German bodies; so that they couldn’t be used as cover for the next group. This place was a death-trap for any Germans nearby.
General Vasily Chuikov had even claimed that “more Germans died trying to take Pavlovs house than did taking Paris”

Anyway, those guys were pretty cool I thought.

severelackofimagination:

Pavlovs house; Stalingrad. Marked as a “fortress” on German maps.

Named after Sergeant Yakov Pavlov, initially with a 30 man squad this building was taken from the Germans, post capture, only 4 of the squad remained alive, Sgt Pavlov being most senior. Taking Stalin’s “not one step back” order for what it was, Sgt Pavlov quickly organised the defence of this building. Land mines, barbed wire, machine guns and anti tank guns were set up. Within days of the buildings capture, Soviet reinforcements arrived, boosting troop numbers to 25.

For 2 months straight post capture, Pavlov and his men defended this building from daily German attacks, towards the end, it was said that Pavlov and his men had to run out into the square to kick over the piles of German bodies; so that they couldn’t be used as cover for the next group. This place was a death-trap for any Germans nearby.

General Vasily Chuikov had even claimed that “more Germans died trying to take Pavlovs house than did taking Paris”

Anyway, those guys were pretty cool I thought.

(Source: vercingetori-x, via ppsh-41)

the-seed-of-europe:

A young Soviet soldier named Alexei. Died near Pogostye village in 1942. Photographed by the photo reporter of the 311th Rifle Division, D.F. Onokhin.

the-seed-of-europe:

A young Soviet soldier named Alexei. Died near Pogostye village in 1942. Photographed by the photo reporter of the 311th Rifle Division, D.F. Onokhin.

(via lenins-little-potato)