beyondvictoriana:

steampunkgirls:

Psyche Corporation

Hey, it’s Gen of Psyche Corporation! Her stuff is amazing ^^

beyondvictoriana:

steampunkgirls:

Psyche Corporation

Hey, it’s Gen of Psyche Corporation! Her stuff is amazing ^^

art-of-the-dwarves:


“African Dwarf” by Ebony Chan.

art-of-the-dwarves:

African Dwarf” by Ebony Chan.

(via sourcedumal)

seekingwillow:

womenwhokickass:

Staceyann Chin: Why she kicks ass
She is an openly lesbian spoken word poet, performing artist and LGBTQ rights activist.
She is of Chinese-Jamaican and Afro-Jamaican descent, was born in Jamaica and now lives in Brooklyn.
You can see one of her many powerful performances here. 
Her work has been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Pittsburgh Daily, and has been featured on 60 Minutes.
She has a child and you can read about her experiences being pregnant here.
She performed in and co-wrote the Tony-nominated Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam on Broadway.
She has held worldwide poetry workshops.
She has many books and CDs and also an autobiographical novel, “The Other Side of Paradise - A Memoir”.
She is a host on Logo’s After Ellen Internet show, “She Said What?” and a co-host of Centric’s My Two Cents.

a

seekingwillow:

womenwhokickass:

Staceyann Chin: Why she kicks ass

  • She is an openly lesbian spoken word poet, performing artist and LGBTQ rights activist.
  • She is of Chinese-Jamaican and Afro-Jamaican descent, was born in Jamaica and now lives in Brooklyn.
  • You can see one of her many powerful performances here
  • Her work has been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Pittsburgh Daily, and has been featured on 60 Minutes.
  • She has a child and you can read about her experiences being pregnant here.
  • She performed in and co-wrote the Tony-nominated Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam on Broadway.
  • She has held worldwide poetry workshops.
  • She has many books and CDs and also an autobiographical novel, “The Other Side of Paradise - A Memoir”.
  • She is a host on Logo’s After Ellen Internet show, “She Said What?” and a co-host of Centric’s My Two Cents.

a

harriet-ben-twerkin-on-da-rr:

str8nochaser:

theblackamericanprincess:

racialicious:

Y’all know we were kinda stoked about Octavia Spencer’s sexy-babe Elle cover, right? Come to find out that it’s not going to be on the newsstands but only available to subscribers. The newsstands will get the cover with Sarah Jessica Parker on it.
O_o 

Not on newstands??? Wish I could be surprised.

Fuck you, Elle

harriet-ben-twerkin-on-da-rr:

str8nochaser:

theblackamericanprincess:

racialicious:

Y’all know we were kinda stoked about Octavia Spencer’s sexy-babe Elle cover, right? Come to find out that it’s not going to be on the newsstands but only available to subscribers. The newsstands will get the cover with Sarah Jessica Parker on it.

O_o 

Not on newstands??? Wish I could be surprised.

Fuck you, Elle

(via jackie-r-stole-3rd-an-a-2piece-)

oldhollywood:

Pam Grier, 1973 (via)

oldhollywood:

Pam Grier, 1973 (via)

(via tough-titty-deactivated20121030)

sourcedumal:

geekeryandhockey:

Because things THIS BADASS must be shared with as many people as possible!

Cosplay credits:

Nubia - Jay Justice

Artemis - Ann McManus

Kingdom Come Diana - Natalie Dawn

Wonder Woman - Lihyen Faye

Donna Troy - Cookie Layne

Cheetah - Shemika Berry

Pictures by Wes Barthlow, Bree Smith, Cookie Layne and Vincent Tyson (from FB)

the-third-revelation:

xtremecaffeine:

Are white people really seriously comparing the Starships video to porno?

Because y’know… In my porno, people FUCK.

yeah man. she’s not even naked. thought her boobs look FANTASTIC. Plus, it that’s porn then what is Britney Spears? Or even Lady Gaga?

oops, I forgot, she’s black, so obvs it can’t be anything besides porn.

Things wrong with the video/song:

Also Nicki looked stunning throughout and seriously I cannot believe she gets so much shit from haters.

(via inactivegrokeseverywhere)

becauseofthiswoman:


Name: Patsy Matsu Takemoto MinkDates: 1927-2002Why she rocks: Patsy Mink was an American politician in Hawaii, and served in the US House of Representatives for 12 terms. She was the first woman of color and the first Asian American woman elected into Congress. She was also the first Asian American to seek the presidential nomination for the Democratic Party in the 1972 election. She also authored the Title IX Amendment of the Higher Education Act, thus having it named after her: “The Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act”
Quote: “We have to build things that we want to see accomplished, in life and in our country, based on our own personal experiences… to make sure that others do not have to suffer the same discrimination.”Because of this woman… we have equal opportunities amendments for higher education, and a multi-cultural presence in politics for women and asian americans. 

becauseofthiswoman:

Name: Patsy Matsu Takemoto Mink
Dates:
1927-2002

Why she rocks:
Patsy Mink was an American politician in Hawaii, and served in the US House of Representatives for 12 terms. She was the first woman of color and the first Asian American woman elected into Congress. She was also the first Asian American to seek the presidential nomination for the Democratic Party in the 1972 election. She also authored the Title IX Amendment of the Higher Education Act, thus having it named after her: “The Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act”


Quote: “We have to build things that we want to see accomplished, in life and in our country, based on our own personal experiences… to make sure that others do not have to suffer the same discrimination.”

Because of this woman… we have equal opportunities amendments for higher education, and a multi-cultural presence in politics for women and asian americans. 

(via fascinasians)

"Am I gay? Am I straight? OH WAIT, I’M JUST SLUTTY!"

(Source: niteflight, via inactivegrokeseverywhere)

"A Letter from Huey Newton...about the Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements"

darkjez:

I felt this text needed to be featured in it’s entirety. Please read! I know it’s long but do it or me? Pwease? …It’s really touching a deep place in my heart. 
     **Emphasis & Italicization Mine

HUEY P. NEWTON—

During the past few years strong movements have developed among women and among homosexuals seeking their liberation. There has been some uncertainty about how to relate to these movements.

Whatever your personal opinions and your insecurities about homosexuality and the various liberation movements among homosexuals and women (and I speak of the homosexuals and women as oppressed groups), we should try to unite with them in a revolutionary fashion. I say “whatever your insecurities are” because as we very well know, sometimes our first instinct is to want to hit a homosexual in the mouth, and want a woman to be quiet. We want to hit a homosexual in the mouth because we are afraid that we might be homosexual; and we want to hit the women or shut her up because we are afraid that she might castrate us, or take the nuts that we might not have to start with.

We must gain security in ourselves and therefore have respect and feelings for all oppressed people. We must not use the racist attitude that the White racists use against our people because they are Black and poor. Many times the poorest White person is the most racist because he is afraid that he might lose something, or discover something that he does not have. So you’re some kind of a threat to him. This kind of psychology is in operation when we view oppressed people and we are angry with them because of their particular kind of behavior, or their particular kind of deviation from the established norm.

Remember, we have not established a revolutionary value system; we are only in the process of establishing it. I do not remember our ever constituting any value that said that a revolutionary must say offensive things towards homosexuals, or that a revolutionary should make sure that women do not speak out about their own particular kind of oppression. As a matter of fact, it is just the opposite: we say that we recognize the women’s right to be free. We have not said much about the homosexual at all, but we must relate to the homosexual movement because it is a real thing. And I know through reading, and through my life experience and observations that homosexuals are not given freedom and liberty by anyone in the society. They might be the most oppressed people in the society.

And what made them homosexual? Perhaps it’s a phenomenon that I don’t understand entirely. Some people say that it is the decadence of capitalism. I don’t know if that is the case; I rather doubt it. But whatever the case is, we know that homosexuality is a fact that exists, and we must understand it in its purest form: that is, a person should have the freedom to use his body in whatever way he wants.

That is not endorsing things in homosexuality that we wouldn’t view as revolutionary. But there is nothing to say that a homosexual cannot also be a revolutionary. And maybe I’m now injecting some of my prejudice by saying that “even a homosexual can be a revolutionary.” Quite the contrary, maybe a homosexual could be the most revolutionary.

When we have revolutionary conferences, rallies, and demonstrations, there should be full participation of the gay liberation movement and the women’s liberation movement. Some groups might be more revolutionary than others. We should not use the actions of a few to say that they are all reactionary or counterrevolutionary, because they are not.

We should deal with the factions just as we deal with any other group or party that claims to be revolutionary. We should try to judge, somehow, whether they are operating in a sincere revolutionary fashion and from a really oppressed situation. (And we will grant that if they are women they are probably oppressed.) If they do things that are unrevolutionary or counterrevolutionary, then criticize that action. If we feel that the group in spirit means to be revolutionary in practice, but they make mistakes in interpretation of the revolutionary philosophy, or they do not understand the dialectics of the social forces in operation, we should criticize that and not criticize them because they are women trying to be free. And the same is true for homosexuals. We should never say a whole movement is dishonest when in fact they are trying to be honest. They are just making honest mistakes. Friends are allowed to make mistakes. The enemy is not allowed to make mistakes because his whole existence is a mistake, and we suffer from it. But the women’s liberation front and gay liberation front are our friends, they are our potential allies, and we need as many allies as possible.

We should be willing to discuss the insecurities that many people have about homosexuality. When I say “insecurities,” I mean the fear that they are some kind of threat to our manhood. I can understand this fear. Because of the long conditioning process which builds insecurity in the American male, homosexuality might produce certain hang-ups in us. I have hang-ups myself about male homosexuality. But on the other hand, I have no hang-up about female homosexuality. And that is a phenomenon in itself. I think it is probably because male homosexuality is a threat to me and female homosexuality is not.

We should be careful about using those terms that might turn our friends off. The terms “faggot” and “punk” should be deleted from our vocabulary, and especially we should not attach names normally designed for homosexuals to men who are enemies of the people, such as Nixon or Mitchell. Homosexuals are not enemies of the people.

We should try to form a working coalition with the gay liberation and women’s liberation groups. We must always handle social forces in the most appropriate manner

nuestrahermana:

Fuck yeah, WOC Friday’s!

nuestrahermana:

Fuck yeah, WOC Friday’s!

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

"As Black women, we do not have the privilege or the space to call ourselves “slut” without validating the already historically entrenched ideology and recurring messages about what and who the Black woman is. We don’t have the privilege to play on destructive representations burned in our collective minds, on our bodies and souls for generations. Although we understand the valid impetus behind the use of the word “slut” as language to frame and brand an anti-rape movement, we are gravely concerned. For us the trivialization of rape and the absence of justice are viciously intertwined with narratives of sexual surveillance, legal access and availability to our personhood. It is tied to institutionalized ideology about our bodies as sexualized objects of property, as spectacles of sexuality and deviant sexual desire. It is tied to notions about our clothed or unclothed bodies as unable to be raped whether on the auction block, in the fields or on living room television screens. The perception and wholesale acceptance of speculations about what the Black woman wants, what she needs and what she deserves has truly, long crossed the boundaries of her mode of dress."

From: An Open Letter from Black Women to the SlutWalk

(via laborreguita)

(Source: queerlyfemmetastic, via tough-titty-deactivated20121030)