soulbrotherv2:

The Wanderer: The Last American Slave Ship and the Conspiracy That Set Its Sails by Erick Calonius
On Nov. 28, 1858, a ship called the Wanderer slipped silently into a coastal channel and unloaded its cargo of over 400 African slaves onto Jekyll Island, Georgia, thirty eight years after the African slave trade had been made illegal. It was the last ship ever to bring a cargo of African slaves to American soil. 
Built in 1856, the Wanderer began life as a luxury racing yacht, flying the pennant of the New York Yacht Club and cited as the successor to the famous yacht America. But within a year of its creation, the Wanderer was secretly converted into a slave ship, and, with the New York Yacht Club pennant still flying above as a diversion, sailed off to Africa. The Wanderer’s mission was meant to be more than a slaving venture, however. It was designed by its radical conspirators to defy the federal government and speed the nation’s descent into civil war.
The New York Times first reported the story as a hoax; however, as groups of Africans began to appear in the small towns surrounding Savannah, the story of the Wanderer began to leak out; igniting a fire of protest and debate that made headlines throughout the nation and across the Atlantic.
As the story shifts between Savannah, Jekyll Island, the Congo River, London, and New York City, the Wanderer’s tale is played out in heated Southern courtrooms, the offices of the New York Times, The White House, the slave markets of Africa and some of the most charming homes Southern royalty had to offer.  In a gripping account of the high seas and the high life in New York and Savannah, Erik Calonius brings to light one of the most important and little remembered stories of the Civil War period. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

The Wanderer: The Last American Slave Ship and the Conspiracy That Set Its Sails by Erick Calonius

On Nov. 28, 1858, a ship called the Wanderer slipped silently into a coastal channel and unloaded its cargo of over 400 African slaves onto Jekyll Island, Georgia, thirty eight years after the African slave trade had been made illegal. It was the last ship ever to bring a cargo of African slaves to American soil. 

Built in 1856, the Wanderer began life as a luxury racing yacht, flying the pennant of the New York Yacht Club and cited as the successor to the famous yacht America. But within a year of its creation, the Wanderer was secretly converted into a slave ship, and, with the New York Yacht Club pennant still flying above as a diversion, sailed off to Africa. The Wanderer’s mission was meant to be more than a slaving venture, however. It was designed by its radical conspirators to defy the federal government and speed the nation’s descent into civil war.

The New York Times first reported the story as a hoax; however, as groups of Africans began to appear in the small towns surrounding Savannah, the story of the Wanderer began to leak out; igniting a fire of protest and debate that made headlines throughout the nation and across the Atlantic.

As the story shifts between Savannah, Jekyll Island, the Congo River, London, and New York City, the Wanderer’s tale is played out in heated Southern courtrooms, the offices of the New York Times, The White House, the slave markets of Africa and some of the most charming homes Southern royalty had to offer.  In a gripping account of the high seas and the high life in New York and Savannah, Erik Calonius brings to light one of the most important and little remembered stories of the Civil War period. [book link]

auauk:

Japanese-American Internment (the result of Executive Order 9066.)

(via ushistoryminuswhiteguys)

puzzlegirlsandpoprocks:

ch3llst3r:

Smart man.

OMG! Can I say how much I FUCKING LOVE IT when white people reblog/post this Morgan Freeman quote. 
I LOVE IT!
SO FUCKING MUCH!


Man, things are so much better now that Morgan Freeman has been elected international spokesperson for all POC. I can’t imagine what it was like before we learned to stop oppressing ourselves with factual analysis of current and past manifestations of white supremacist/imperialist activities. It was amazing, I didn’t know you could reprogram white people just by not saying the word “racism.”

puzzlegirlsandpoprocks:

ch3llst3r:

Smart man.

OMG! Can I say how much I FUCKING LOVE IT when white people reblog/post this Morgan Freeman quote. 

I LOVE IT!

SO FUCKING MUCH!

Man, things are so much better now that Morgan Freeman has been elected international spokesperson for all POC. I can’t imagine what it was like before we learned to stop oppressing ourselves with factual analysis of current and past manifestations of white supremacist/imperialist activities. It was amazing, I didn’t know you could reprogram white people just by not saying the word “racism.”

(via captaindoubled)

candy-flavored-bandaid:

Morgan Freeman

candy-flavored-bandaid:

Morgan Freeman

(Source: badwolfday)

"If I have a cup of coffee that is too strong for me because it is too black, I weaken it by pouring cream into it. I integrate it with cream. If I keep pouring enough cream in the coffee, pretty soon the entire flavor of the coffee is changed; the very nature of the coffee is changed. If enough cream is poured in, eventually you don’t even know that I had coffee in this cup. This is what happened with the March on Washington. The whites didn’t integrate it; they infiltrated it. Whites joined it; they engulfed it; they became so much a part of it, it lost its original flavor. It ceased to be a black march; it ceased to be militant; it ceased to be angry; it ceased to be impatient. In fact, it ceased to be a march."

Malcolm X

This is my feelings regarding the Help and every other Civil Rights related movie Hollywood has ever produced. The White Savior theme is disingenuous, in addition to being incredibly inaccurate. 

(via dank-potion)

(Source: maarnayeri, via digestivepyrotechnics)

yearningforunity:

Coon Chicken Inn
Driving up to the Coon Chicken Inn, one would be greeted by a huge face serving as the restaurant’s entrance. First you would see huge lips, the porter’s hat, and the over exaggerated features portraying African Americans as mere cartoon characters not as humans. Customers would enter the restaurant through the mouth. This image was the Coon Chicken Inns well known and generally well liked logo. Inside one could order the Coon Chicken special, or the Baby Coon Chicken special from a menu shaped like the Coon Chicken Inn logo. Waiting for your food, you could sip water from a glass with the same logo. The food arrived on a plate, with yet again, the same distorted image staring back at you.
The former headwaiter of the Coon Chicken Inn, Mr. Ford Winters later states, “ he was not at all racist, he just did not think about it at the time, nobody did. “Racism like that was accepted, people just put it in the back of their minds and did not think about it”.
Pure Fuckery

yearningforunity:

Coon Chicken Inn

Driving up to the Coon Chicken Inn, one would be greeted by a huge face serving as the restaurant’s entrance. First you would see huge lips, the porter’s hat, and the over exaggerated features portraying African Americans as mere cartoon characters not as humans. Customers would enter the restaurant through the mouth. This image was the Coon Chicken Inns well known and generally well liked logo. Inside one could order the Coon Chicken special, or the Baby Coon Chicken special from a menu shaped like the Coon Chicken Inn logo. Waiting for your food, you could sip water from a glass with the same logo. The food arrived on a plate, with yet again, the same distorted image staring back at you.

The former headwaiter of the Coon Chicken Inn, Mr. Ford Winters later states, “ he was not at all racist, he just did not think about it at the time, nobody did. “Racism like that was accepted, people just put it in the back of their minds and did not think about it”.

Pure Fuckery