(via neuromaencer)

Did you know?

the-next-emperor:

Toilet paper was invented in China in the late 1300s. It was for emperors only.

Source.

stechkin:

On the Corner, Hangzhou, China, 2012 - Davey Warren

stechkin:

On the Corner, Hangzhou, China, 2012 - Davey Warren

stechkin:

Robot Dumpling Maker, Hangzhou, China, 2012 - Davey Warren

stechkin:

Robot Dumpling Maker, Hangzhou, China, 2012 - Davey Warren

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

HairpinsEarly 20th centuryChina

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Hairpins
Early 20th century
China

"I learned that the wild rice that is sold in expensive packaging in supermarkets across the United States is nothing but the rebranding of settler colonialism. In fact, hummus is to Palestine as wild rice is to Native America. As Israel continues to claim the Palestinian kitchen as its own, so does the United States with Native America: consuming corn, wild rice, quinoa, cranberry, cornbread and turkey with the confidence of a national cuisine. In the United States, settler colonialism has been so complete, and so successful, that the world has forgotten that South Africa, Australia and Israel are all reproductions, all approximations of the ongoing victory back home."

Maya MikdashiWhat is Settler Colonialism? (via nezua)

(via stopwhitewashing)

fuckyeahsouthasia:

mehreenkasana:

Sunni protesters in Lahore, Pakistan show their support for the persecuted Shia minority. Urdu sign says: “We severely condemn the murders of our Shia brothers.”
[x]
This is a bold, brave statement. Bravo.

Yes.

fuckyeahsouthasia:

mehreenkasana:

Sunni protesters in Lahore, Pakistan show their support for the persecuted Shia minority. Urdu sign says: “We severely condemn the murders of our Shia brothers.”

[x]

This is a bold, brave statement. Bravo.

Yes.

zuky:

This impressive monument in Heilongjiang Province is a war memorial in honor of Eight Women Soldiers of Wuchang who fended off the invading Japanese army in 1938. The Chinese had been been taking heavy losses in a fierce battle at Wuchang, when these eight soldiers of the Women’s Regiment decided to make a stand which would allow some of their comrades to retreat. They all sustained injuries and fought until they ran out of ammunition, at which point they joined hands and threw themselves into the swift waters of the Wusihun River in order to avoid enemy capture.

(via karnythia)

Against the British Empire

mehreenkasana:

afraid-to-run asked: can you please recommend good books to recommend to ignorant english folk about the british empire in all it’s disgusting glory?

My answer:

Good question. I can speak from the South Asian experience of it; the Subcontinent - present day India, Pakistan, and to an extent Afghanistan. Before getting in the books I’d recommend, you should tell those who support British imperialism that life back then wasn’t as glorious as historians make it look like. With the basics:

  • Indian economy was the second largest economy in the world until the British came. During British rule (1857 to 1947) Indian economy grew at zero percent. That India did not grow for 90 years (when Industrial revolution was rewarding Europe and the US) is a tragic outcome of colonial rule’s lack of interest and incompetence. Credit goes to laissez faire capitalism pursued by India after 1992 and American capital market’s confidence and investments in India for India’s emergence as the second fastest growing economy in the world today. 
  • The subcontinent suffered too many famines during the British rule mostly attributable to mismanagement by the Empire.
  • The British Empire encouraged biased stratification in the subcontinental societies based on caste, color and creed. This continues to exist in modern day South Asia where social markers like these control the fates of many.
  • Many pro-Empire theorists argue that the British built modern cities with modern conveniences but it should be noted that these were exclusive zones not intended for the “natives” to enjoy.
  • There is another popular belief about British rule: ‘The British modernized Indian agriculture by building canals.’ But the actual record reveals a completely different story. “The roads and tanks and canals,” noted an observer in G. Thompson’s “India and the Colonies”, ”which Hindu or Mussulman (Muslim) governments constructed for the service of the nations and the good of the country have been suffered to fall into dilapidation; and now the want of the means of irrigation causes famines.” Montgomery Martin, in his standard work “The Indian Empire”, in 1858, noted that the old East India Company “omitted not only to initiate improvements, but even to keep in repair the old works upon which the revenue depended.” They screwed the natives over again.
  • In the early 1800s imports of Indian cotton and silk goods faced duties of 70-80%. British imports faced duties of 2-4%! As a result, British imports of cotton manufactures into India increased by a factor of 50, and Indian exports dropped to one-fourth. A similiar trend was noted in silk goods, woollens, iron, pottery, glassware and paper. As a result, millions of ruined artisans and craftsmen, spinners, weavers, potters, smelters and smiths were rendered jobless and had to become landless agricultural workers. They screwed us over again.
  • Reactionary borders.
  • And many other reasons why you should logic-slap those who support Empire(s).

The books I would suggest are: M. M. Ahluwalia’s Freedom Struggle in India. Shah, Khambata’s The Wealth and Taxable Capacity of India. G. Emerson’s Voiceless India.Brooks Adams’s The Law of Civilization and Decline. J. R. Seeley’s, Expansion of England. H. H. Wilson, History of British India. D. H Buchanan’s Development of Capitalist Enterprise in India.

Slightly unrelated but you should Gender and Community Under British Colonialism: Emotion, Struggle and Politics in a Chinese Village by Siu Keung Cheung as well. Hope this helps.

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)

‘From the Ruins of Empire’ - An engaging account of how intellectuals in Asia and the Middle East responded to European imperialism by Pankaj Mishra

Was there even an “east” at all? How much – apart from the pain of being condescended to, ruled and humiliated in countless ways by Europeans and Americans – did the very different faiths, languages and historical communities of the lands between the Mediterranean and the Pacific really share? The truth is that cosmopolitans – whether anti-colonial or communist – were generally let down by the 20th century and the rapid spread of nationalism across the colonial world in the hands of technocrats, military men and party officials. By the 1930s, at the latest, pan-Islamism and pan-Arabism were both dead as political projects; neither Nasser nor (much later) al-Qaeda had any chance of reviving them. As for pan-Asianism, it was pretty much dealt a deathblow once the Japanese turned it into an excuse for their own version of imperialism.

A disparate bunch, Mishra’s preferred thinkers are wanderers, anti-colonial cosmopolitans who dream of new alliances of peoples and who warn of western materialism and the need to preserve spirituality and faith across borders.

From the Ruins of Empire offers an engaging account of how, at the apogee of European global hegemony, Arab, Persian, Indian, Chinese and Japanese intellectuals responded to the intrusion of colonisers, diplomats and merchants. Dreaming of resistance and re-assertion, they advocated solidarity – sometimes of Muslims, sometimes of Asians – and they felt deep humiliation at their helplessness in the face of the global imbalance of power. The idea that what was happening was some vast clash between the forces of western modernity and eastern tradition has long underpinned a rather benign and often frankly celebratory view of “the expansion of Europe”. Mishra accepts the paradigm but there is nothing very positive about the story as seen through the eyes of its victims and critics.

(Source: mehreenkasana, via fuckyeahsouthasia)

Kandangyan music video Babanam Kevalam shot on location in jungles of Philippines. A popular Filipino group playing their own composed music. Most instruments were handmade.

(Source: ladyurduja)

visitheworld:

Hitachi Seaside Park in Hitachinaka, Ibaraki, Japan (by Enigma911).

visitheworld:

Hitachi Seaside Park in Hitachinaka, Ibaraki, Japan (by Enigma911).

(via digestivepyrotechnics)

visitheworld:

Candle Sculpture in Thung Si Muang Park, Ubon Ratchatani, Thailand (by whereareyoumurphy).

visitheworld:

Candle Sculpture in Thung Si Muang Park, Ubon Ratchatani, Thailand (by whereareyoumurphy).

(via digestivepyrotechnics)

5feet12inches:

An actual subway sign

So wait, I can’t get a reacharound while being watched by Professor Oak on the Subway in Japan?!

That seems oddly specific.

5feet12inches:

An actual subway sign

So wait, I can’t get a reacharound while being watched by Professor Oak on the Subway in Japan?!

That seems oddly specific.

simply-war:

Vietnam

simply-war:

Vietnam