soulbrotherv2:

The Wanderer: The Last American Slave Ship and the Conspiracy That Set Its Sails by Erick Calonius
On Nov. 28, 1858, a ship called the Wanderer slipped silently into a coastal channel and unloaded its cargo of over 400 African slaves onto Jekyll Island, Georgia, thirty eight years after the African slave trade had been made illegal. It was the last ship ever to bring a cargo of African slaves to American soil. 
Built in 1856, the Wanderer began life as a luxury racing yacht, flying the pennant of the New York Yacht Club and cited as the successor to the famous yacht America. But within a year of its creation, the Wanderer was secretly converted into a slave ship, and, with the New York Yacht Club pennant still flying above as a diversion, sailed off to Africa. The Wanderer’s mission was meant to be more than a slaving venture, however. It was designed by its radical conspirators to defy the federal government and speed the nation’s descent into civil war.
The New York Times first reported the story as a hoax; however, as groups of Africans began to appear in the small towns surrounding Savannah, the story of the Wanderer began to leak out; igniting a fire of protest and debate that made headlines throughout the nation and across the Atlantic.
As the story shifts between Savannah, Jekyll Island, the Congo River, London, and New York City, the Wanderer’s tale is played out in heated Southern courtrooms, the offices of the New York Times, The White House, the slave markets of Africa and some of the most charming homes Southern royalty had to offer.  In a gripping account of the high seas and the high life in New York and Savannah, Erik Calonius brings to light one of the most important and little remembered stories of the Civil War period. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

The Wanderer: The Last American Slave Ship and the Conspiracy That Set Its Sails by Erick Calonius

On Nov. 28, 1858, a ship called the Wanderer slipped silently into a coastal channel and unloaded its cargo of over 400 African slaves onto Jekyll Island, Georgia, thirty eight years after the African slave trade had been made illegal. It was the last ship ever to bring a cargo of African slaves to American soil. 

Built in 1856, the Wanderer began life as a luxury racing yacht, flying the pennant of the New York Yacht Club and cited as the successor to the famous yacht America. But within a year of its creation, the Wanderer was secretly converted into a slave ship, and, with the New York Yacht Club pennant still flying above as a diversion, sailed off to Africa. The Wanderer’s mission was meant to be more than a slaving venture, however. It was designed by its radical conspirators to defy the federal government and speed the nation’s descent into civil war.

The New York Times first reported the story as a hoax; however, as groups of Africans began to appear in the small towns surrounding Savannah, the story of the Wanderer began to leak out; igniting a fire of protest and debate that made headlines throughout the nation and across the Atlantic.

As the story shifts between Savannah, Jekyll Island, the Congo River, London, and New York City, the Wanderer’s tale is played out in heated Southern courtrooms, the offices of the New York Times, The White House, the slave markets of Africa and some of the most charming homes Southern royalty had to offer.  In a gripping account of the high seas and the high life in New York and Savannah, Erik Calonius brings to light one of the most important and little remembered stories of the Civil War period. [book link]

lightspeedsound:

hamburgerjack:


todaysdocument:


preservearchives:


This remarkable photograph shows the then oldest living ex-slave, Mrs. Sally Fickland, viewing the Emancipation Proclamation in the Freedom Train at Philadelphia, on September 17, 1947.  This moving image reminds us of the importance of exhibition lighting policies to control both the intensity and duration of light exposure.  The National Archives carefully limits the light exposure of this landmark document to ensure that it survives for future generations to see.  Emancipation Proclamation, RG 11, ARC # 299998.


The National Archives is commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation with a special display of the original document at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, from Sunday, December 30, to Tuesday, January 1.  This will include extended viewing hours, inspirational music, a dramatic reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, and family activities and entertainment for all ages.


She reads that in 1947. She reads that with Jim Crow looming over her shoulder. She reads that with Lynchings running rampant, she reads that with no more social or political rights than when it was signed. I wonder, did she read that on a special day where they were letting Blacks Only read it?
Cause in 1947 they damn sure wasn’t going to let her in with any White people. That’s 1947. That’s after Black soldiers, men and women came back from fighting ANOTHER war, hoping to get appreciated, hoping to get rights and getting nothing.
Something written by a man who cared nothing for or about Black people. Said to be one of his LEAST passionate speeches. Written by someone who didn’t want us here and only decided he was going to let Black fight for the country they’d built after the loss of White life was overwhelming.
I wonder how she felt. She must know it’s some bullshit, having seen the truth of this nation.


^^^^Truth.
I look at this picture, I don’t see some white-washed image of a “HAPPY EX-SLAVE TALKING ABOUT HOW AWESOME SHIT IS NOW”
I see a dissatisfied woman who’s looking at that shit, trying to think, “where the fuck did this shit go wrong, then?” 
OH AND BY THE WAY
WHY THE FUCK WAS THE FIRST PART ALL ABOUT “OH HEY LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW WE GOTTA PRESERVE HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS”
SERIOUSLY, WHITE PPL?
SEE A PICTURE OF A BLACK WOMAN LOOKING AT THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION
AND YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT LIGHTING AND EXPOSURE
AND NOT IN A RACE WAY
IN A ‘WE DON’T WANT THE INK TO FADE” WAY?
WHAT THE FUCK 

lightspeedsound:

hamburgerjack:

todaysdocument:

preservearchives:

This remarkable photograph shows the then oldest living ex-slave, Mrs. Sally Fickland, viewing the Emancipation Proclamation in the Freedom Train at Philadelphia, on September 17, 1947.  This moving image reminds us of the importance of exhibition lighting policies to control both the intensity and duration of light exposure.  The National Archives carefully limits the light exposure of this landmark document to ensure that it survives for future generations to see.  Emancipation Proclamation, RG 11, ARC # 299998.

The National Archives is commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation with a special display of the original document at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, from Sunday, December 30, to Tuesday, January 1.  This will include extended viewing hours, inspirational music, a dramatic reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, and family activities and entertainment for all ages.

She reads that in 1947. She reads that with Jim Crow looming over her shoulder. She reads that with Lynchings running rampant, she reads that with no more social or political rights than when it was signed. I wonder, did she read that on a special day where they were letting Blacks Only read it?

Cause in 1947 they damn sure wasn’t going to let her in with any White people. That’s 1947. That’s after Black soldiers, men and women came back from fighting ANOTHER war, hoping to get appreciated, hoping to get rights and getting nothing.

Something written by a man who cared nothing for or about Black people. Said to be one of his LEAST passionate speeches. Written by someone who didn’t want us here and only decided he was going to let Black fight for the country they’d built after the loss of White life was overwhelming.

I wonder how she felt. She must know it’s some bullshit, having seen the truth of this nation.

^^^^Truth.

I look at this picture, I don’t see some white-washed image of a “HAPPY EX-SLAVE TALKING ABOUT HOW AWESOME SHIT IS NOW”

I see a dissatisfied woman who’s looking at that shit, trying to think, “where the fuck did this shit go wrong, then?” 

OH AND BY THE WAY

WHY THE FUCK WAS THE FIRST PART ALL ABOUT “OH HEY LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW WE GOTTA PRESERVE HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS”

SERIOUSLY, WHITE PPL?

SEE A PICTURE OF A BLACK WOMAN LOOKING AT THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION

AND YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT LIGHTING AND EXPOSURE

AND NOT IN A RACE WAY

IN A ‘WE DON’T WANT THE INK TO FADE” WAY?

WHAT THE FUCK 

(via lightspeedsound)

hamburgerjack:

todaysdocument:

preservearchives:

This remarkable photograph shows the then oldest living ex-slave, Mrs. Sally Fickland, viewing the Emancipation Proclamation in the Freedom Train at Philadelphia, on September 17, 1947.  This moving image reminds us of the importance of exhibition lighting policies to control both the intensity and duration of light exposure.  The National Archives carefully limits the light exposure of this landmark document to ensure that it survives for future generations to see.  Emancipation Proclamation, RG 11, ARC # 299998.

The National Archives is commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation with a special display of the original document at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, from Sunday, December 30, to Tuesday, January 1.  This will include extended viewing hours, inspirational music, a dramatic reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, and family activities and entertainment for all ages.

She reads that in 1947. She reads that with Jim Crow looming over her shoulder. She reads that with Lynchings running rampant, she reads that with no more social or political rights than when it was signed. I wonder, did she read that on a special day where they were letting Blacks Only read it?
Cause in 1947 they damn sure wasn’t going to let her in with any White people. That’s 1947. That’s after Black soldiers, men and women came back from fighting ANOTHER war, hoping to get appreciated, hoping to get rights and getting nothing.
Something written by a man who cared nothing for or about Black people. Said to be one of his LEAST passionate speeches. Written by someone who didn’t want us here and only decided he was going to let Black fight for the country they’d built after the loss of White life was overwhelming.
I wonder how she felt. She must know it’s some bullshit, having seen the truth of this nation.

hamburgerjack:

todaysdocument:

preservearchives:

This remarkable photograph shows the then oldest living ex-slave, Mrs. Sally Fickland, viewing the Emancipation Proclamation in the Freedom Train at Philadelphia, on September 17, 1947.  This moving image reminds us of the importance of exhibition lighting policies to control both the intensity and duration of light exposure.  The National Archives carefully limits the light exposure of this landmark document to ensure that it survives for future generations to see.  Emancipation Proclamation, RG 11, ARC # 299998.

The National Archives is commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation with a special display of the original document at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, from Sunday, December 30, to Tuesday, January 1.  This will include extended viewing hours, inspirational music, a dramatic reading of the Emancipation Proclamation, and family activities and entertainment for all ages.

She reads that in 1947. She reads that with Jim Crow looming over her shoulder. She reads that with Lynchings running rampant, she reads that with no more social or political rights than when it was signed. I wonder, did she read that on a special day where they were letting Blacks Only read it?

Cause in 1947 they damn sure wasn’t going to let her in with any White people. That’s 1947. That’s after Black soldiers, men and women came back from fighting ANOTHER war, hoping to get appreciated, hoping to get rights and getting nothing.

Something written by a man who cared nothing for or about Black people. Said to be one of his LEAST passionate speeches. Written by someone who didn’t want us here and only decided he was going to let Black fight for the country they’d built after the loss of White life was overwhelming.

I wonder how she felt. She must know it’s some bullshit, having seen the truth of this nation.

(via youngbadmangone)

Blacks and Asians: Revisiting Racial Formations

lucidstrike:

sara-huynh:

Volume 3, Number 3

CONTENTS

Transforming Ethnic Studies
Manning Marable

Tokyo Bound: African Americans and Japan Confront White Supremacy
Gerald Horne

Yellow Power: The Formation of Asian-American Nationalism in the Age of Black Power, 1966-1975
Jeffery O.G. Ogbar

East of the Sun (West of the Moon): Islam, the Ahmadis, and African America
Moustafa Bayoumi 

Linking African and Asian in Passing and Passage: The Pagoda and the True History of Paradise
Lisa Yun

B-Boys and Bass Girls: Sex, Style, and Mobility in Indian American Youth Culture
Sunaina Marr Maira

Building the Antiracist, Anti-Imperalist United Front: Theory and Practice from the L.A. Strategy Center and Bus Riders Union
Eric Mann

Adding: ‘Left or Right of the Color Line: Asian Americans and the Racial Justice Movement’ from ChangeLab
image
Always reblog.

(via fyeahcracker)

wakeupblackpower:

Song of the Day: “Say It Loud, I’m Black and I’m Proud”

James Brown. my favorite my favorite is when he puts on the cape and then throws it off…

(via ausetkmt)

The consequences of racism on the cultural level…

fyeahblackhistory:

‘Racism, as we have seen, is only one element of a vaster whole: that of the systematized oppression of a people. How does an oppressing people behave? Here we rediscover constants.

We witness the destruction of cultural values, of ways of life. Language, dress, techniques, are devalorized. How can one account for this constant? Psychologists, who tend to explain everything by movements of the psyche, claim to discover this behavior on the level of contacts between individuals: the criticism of an original hat, of a way of speaking, of walking …

Such attempts deliberately leave out of account the special character of the colonial situation. In reality the nations that undertake a colonial war have no concern for the confrontation of cultures. War is a gigantic business and every approach must be governed by this datum. The enslavement, in the strictest sense, of the native population is the prime necessity.

For this its systems of reference have to be broken. Expropriation, spoliation, raids, objective murder, are matched by the sacking of cultural patterns, or at least condition such sacking. The social panorama is destructured; values are flaunted, crushed, emptied.

The lines of force, having crumbled, no longer give direction.

In their stead a new system of values is imposed, not proposed but affirmed, by the heavy weight of cannons and sabres.’

Frantz Fanon’s speech (in French) before the First Congress of  Negro Writers and Artists in Paris in September 1956 and published in the Special Issue of Presence Africaine, June-November, 1956, remains a classic study of Racism and Culture.

Today Frantz Fanon’s work is used by various racial groups to combat racism and colonialism

(Source: tamilnation.co, via ausetkmt)

afriquecouture:

fuckyeahginatorres:


When I became an actress I quickly realize that the world liked their latinos to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts. I was going up for African American parts. […] 
Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language better and understood the culture better, those [stereotypical latina] weren’t the parts that…I could take seriously. Suddenly you have to explain why I look how I look. And then it gets complicated. And nobody wants complicated.

Gina Torres | Black Latino 

and THIS is how diverse black culture is. It’s not just one thing.

afriquecouture:

fuckyeahginatorres:

When I became an actress I quickly realize that the world liked their latinos to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts. I was going up for African American parts. […]

Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language better and understood the culture better, those [stereotypical latina] weren’t the parts that…I could take seriously. Suddenly you have to explain why I look how I look. And then it gets complicated. And nobody wants complicated.

Gina Torres | Black Latino

and THIS is how diverse black culture is. It’s not just one thing.

(via the-real-goddamazon)

Umm….colonialism.

evolutia:

If anyone needs evidence that the colonialism still permeates that US in a significant era, just look at how black people are never good enough to speak for themselves. Recently Ann Coulter stepped forward with statements regarding civil rights and that those rights are only for “The blacks” and other marginalized groups shouldn’t affiliate themselves with it. Voter ID fraud measures that have targeted low income areas with a focus on black people. Because rather than to try and engage with us “savages” it just be better to reinstate the poll tax to vote.

I dare you to ask anyone to ask why African American’s primary vote Democratically and you’ll get answers literally saying black people don’t know any better like we’re some dog or animal. 

Black people are never asked for our opinion. How we’d like to be treated. How we can fix problems with this attitude thinking that we are “escaped slaves” and are just running wild.

Hey guess what I like playing pokemon. Can you actually believe it? A black person playing a video game. :/

Overall and ending this. Some people really need to pick up the phone because we blacks have been tried to get an answer to some serious questions for a long time.

(via ausetkmt)

I Have A Dream Speech by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (FULL TEXT)

ladyatheist:

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation’s capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked “insufficient funds.” But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check — a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quick sands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God’s children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

As we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, “When will you be satisfied?” We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied, as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro’s basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating “For Whites Only”. We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, “My country, ‘tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring.”

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

—————

(Full video here)

(Source: womanistgamergirl, via karnythia)

ablackgirlintheworld:

A monument I visited last month in Stone Town, Zanzibar commemorating the selling and shipping of slaves from Tanzania to the West Indies in Zanzibar’s infamous slave market.

The faces of the sculptures were so powerful, I got an eery feeling that took a while to shake.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

POT OF GOLD: 95 free Black History e-book package downloads

notaskingforpermission:

The second set of links for each package work better- you can download as many as you want at once and there’s no waiting in-between like with the first set of file-host links.

i just wish the selection was more woman-heavy :/

Read More

(Source: knightsofimhoteplibrary.blogspot.com, via strugglingtobeheard)

unaguerrasinfondo:

Lucecita (Luz Esther Benítez) - musician and activist.
Lucecita was blacklisted from Puerto Rican television during the early 1970s for her refusal to whiten her appearance and for her support of revolutionary movements in Puerto Rico and Cuba (many Puerto Rican television stations were owned and staffed primarily by white cuban exiles). In response to the harsh criticism she drew due to her adoption of what was referred to by the Puerto Rican press as ‘the African look’, Lucecita released songs that rejected eurocentrism and celebrated the African heritage of Puerto Rico. She also transgressed gendered boundaries by performing in ‘masculine’ outfits, such as suits and tuxedos, which were traditionally never worn by women on stage. In addition to her outfits, Lucecita often used masculine adjectives in her songs and interviews, sometimes interchanging between masculine and feminine. The catholic church and homophobia were also targets of Lucecita, both of which she openly criticized throughout the 1970s. 

unaguerrasinfondo:

Lucecita (Luz Esther Benítez) - musician and activist.

Lucecita was blacklisted from Puerto Rican television during the early 1970s for her refusal to whiten her appearance and for her support of revolutionary movements in Puerto Rico and Cuba (many Puerto Rican television stations were owned and staffed primarily by white cuban exiles). In response to the harsh criticism she drew due to her adoption of what was referred to by the Puerto Rican press as ‘the African look’, Lucecita released songs that rejected eurocentrism and celebrated the African heritage of Puerto Rico. She also transgressed gendered boundaries by performing in ‘masculine’ outfits, such as suits and tuxedos, which were traditionally never worn by women on stage. In addition to her outfits, Lucecita often used masculine adjectives in her songs and interviews, sometimes interchanging between masculine and feminine. The catholic church and homophobia were also targets of Lucecita, both of which she openly criticized throughout the 1970s. 

(via blueklectic)

afrikanwomen:

Josina Muthemba Machel (August 10, 1945 - April 7, 1971) is a major heroine in the history of Mozambique and the second wife of Samora Machel. Her grandfather was a lay Presbyterian evangelist who preached nationalism and cultural identity against European assimilation. Her father worked as a nurse in government hospitals. At one time, Josina and her family were all jailed as a result of their participation in clandestine opposition to the Portuguese colonial administration. She became a key figure in the Mozambican struggle for independence, promoted the emancipation of African women, married the man who would become the country’s first president, and died at the age of 25.

At age 7, Josina entered the primary school for the children of Portuguese and assimilated African families, she later entered “Dr. Azevedo e Silva” school to pursue an interest in accounting. Two years later, she joined the Nucleo dos Estudantes Secondários de Moçambique (Mozambican Secondary Students Group), which encourages cultural identity and political awareness among secondary students. In March 1964 she fled the country with several other students with the intention of joining the Mozambican Liberation Front (FRELIMO), which was based in Tanzania. They managed to travel as far as the border between Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Zambia but were arrested by the police and jailed. Five months later, at her 19th birthday, Josina was released from jail as a result of an international campaign carried out by FRELIMO.

As she reached her 20th birthday, Josina was immediately assigned responsibilities within FRELIMO’s multifaceted quest for national independence. She began to work at the Mozambique Institute, a residential education center for Mozambican students in Tanzania, as assistant to the director. She turned down an offer of a scholarship in Switzerland to volunteer for FRELIMO’s newly created Women’s Branch (Destacamento Feminino). The Women’s Branch provides women with political and military training in order for them to be fully integrated into the liberation struggle. This initiative was criticized because it went against traditional African cultural norms.

In May 1969, she married Samora Machel at the Educational Center of Tunduru in southern Tanzania, a facility she had helped to develop. At the end of November, Josina and Samora’s only child was born.

During 1970 Josina begins to suffer from stomach pains and weakness. She went to Moscow for medical reasons. A year later, she became seriously ill again. She was taken to Muhimbili Hospital and died on April 7, 1971 at the age of 25. She was buried in Kinondoni Cemetery.

A year later, FRELIMO declared April 7, the day of Josina’s death, as National Women’s Day in Mozambique. In March 1973 FRELIMO established the National Organization of Mozambican Women as the movement’s social and political arm for women. Inspired in part by the ideals of women’s emancipation that Machel promoted, the organization continued to work for this goal following Mozambican independence in 1975. The principal secondary school in the capital city is named after her.

(—sources: wikipedia and mozambiquehistory)

(via alwaystheoviereya)

Fucking Black History Month.

fromonesurvivortoanother:

wretchedoftheearth:

siddharthasmama:

sapphrikah:

I hate that shit. Hate it.

First of all, I don’t want any boobie consolation facts about who invented listerine strips, the stoplight, air conditioning, or ice cream.

TELL ME ABOUT THE AMOUNT OF COWRIE SHELLS MY BODY WAS WORTH IN THE TRADE.

Tell me about how I very well may have literally be BRANDED into Christianity the moment they would’ve started to wash my African history from my mind and called me a slave.

Tell me about how and why minstrel shows came about.

Tell me that Catch a Tiger by the Toe used to be about a Nigger.

Tell me how many of us were taken from west Africa.

Tell me about Jim Crow (in depth) and Black Codes, income inequality that still exists today that keeps just just as Jim Crow-ed now as we were then.

Tell me even about how our music was stolen, how were started Rock music, how we gets no credit for that.

Stop glossing over our history with these tired as 1-fact-a-day ass school announcements.

And THEN tell my ass why we don’t just teach our actual history in the public school curriculum EVERY DAMN DAY like we’re not sitting next you your white asses learning about you in ever medium possible EVERY DAMN DAY.

YESSSSSSS.

I’m always surprised at what a good job my school district did at teaching at least some of this (and outside of black history month). We learned about racist undertones and history of literature in English classes, the history and origin of music genres in music class, Jim Crow and post-reconstruction codes. My school district was predominantly white and Asian too, so I don’t see why there can’t be a more streamlined way to get this to happen. It infuriates me when I meet people at school (and even my own boyfriend) who know nothing about black history. And the fact that most people had to go out of their fucking way to learn basic history. It’s also not hard to integrate black history into history as a whole. It’s a pretty big part of history that should pop up a lot in a normal history class if the curriculum wasn’t designed by or taught by racists.

Tell me about how Black women dealt with systematic rape and cocercion. I did not learn that until COLLEGE. Like in public school we’d talk about how the children were sold and families were split up…but we never once looked at the racial dynamics of rape and mixing. We never talked about how Black women would often abort or kill their own children to save them. Things like that.

puzzlegirlsandpoprocks:

ch3llst3r:

Smart man.

OMG! Can I say how much I FUCKING LOVE IT when white people reblog/post this Morgan Freeman quote. 
I LOVE IT!
SO FUCKING MUCH!


Man, things are so much better now that Morgan Freeman has been elected international spokesperson for all POC. I can’t imagine what it was like before we learned to stop oppressing ourselves with factual analysis of current and past manifestations of white supremacist/imperialist activities. It was amazing, I didn’t know you could reprogram white people just by not saying the word “racism.”

puzzlegirlsandpoprocks:

ch3llst3r:

Smart man.

OMG! Can I say how much I FUCKING LOVE IT when white people reblog/post this Morgan Freeman quote. 

I LOVE IT!

SO FUCKING MUCH!

Man, things are so much better now that Morgan Freeman has been elected international spokesperson for all POC. I can’t imagine what it was like before we learned to stop oppressing ourselves with factual analysis of current and past manifestations of white supremacist/imperialist activities. It was amazing, I didn’t know you could reprogram white people just by not saying the word “racism.”

(via captaindoubled)