babylonfalling:

The Black Panther (1969). The artist, known only as ‘Blood Brother’, apparently was a worker at Howard Quinn Press where the Black Panther Party (and others, including the Berkeley Barb) had their newspaper printed. Funnily enough he is rumored to have been on the government payroll.

babylonfalling:

The Black Panther (1969). The artist, known only as ‘Blood Brother’, apparently was a worker at Howard Quinn Press where the Black Panther Party (and others, including the Berkeley Barb) had their newspaper printed. Funnily enough he is rumored to have been on the government payroll.

(via milkchocolategrrrl-deactivated2)

brazenbitch:

‘This is a pig. He tries to control black people’

Although the Black Panther Party coloring book was rejected by the BPP and used against them by the FBI, it’s depiction of whiteness is pretty damn accurate 

brazenbitch:

‘This is a pig. He tries to control black people’

Although the Black Panther Party coloring book was rejected by the BPP and used against them by the FBI, it’s depiction of whiteness is pretty damn accurate 

(Source: senhoritaugly)

lotus-eyes:

Yuri Kochiyama and Richard Aoki, Japanese members of the Black Panther Party.

(via fsufeministalumna)

"I absolutely reject the premise there is anything wrong with Black people “talking white”. It is as if to vast swathes of the privileged white left and impoverished Black community diction, education and a mastery of thought is somehow “white”… comrade, how wrong you are to say that after decades in academia I’m acting white. I’m being black. I’m being black everyday a cop pulls my car over for a “routine stop”, I’m being black each time I look in the mirror, and I’m damn well being black when I school young fools out of the myth our race is too ill-evolved to be both black and accomplished."

Elaine Brown, Secretary of the Black Panther Party, professor of sociology.  (via ifury)

THIS.

(via morticiamorticia)

LIFE!

(via therhapsodyincidents)

Exactly. There is no such thing as “acting white.” Blackness is its own fucking entity that is rich and multifaceted.

(via sourcedumal)

(Source: scarlettinred, via the-real-goddamazon)

sons-of-yemaya:

On the 40th anniversary of the Black Panther Party, photographer Stephen Shames finally published his monograph, The Black Panthers. The book, which had originally been set for publication in the early 1970s, had been driven off the presses by none other than then-Vice President Spiro Agnew.

sons-of-yemaya:

On the 40th anniversary of the Black Panther Party, photographer Stephen Shames finally published his monograph, The Black Panthers. The book, which had originally been set for publication in the early 1970s, had been driven off the presses by none other than then-Vice President Spiro Agnew.

(via dreams-from-my-father)

ewok89:

ewok89:

(Source: praxis89, via sapphrikah)

nativethoughts:

If you read the FBI files you will see that even Mr. J. Edgar  Hoover himself had to say that it was not the guns that were the  greatest threat to the internal security of the United States of  America; it was not the guns, it was the Free Children’s Breakfast  Program that was the greatest threat to the internal security of the  United States of America. Grits. Now why was it the Free Children’s  Breakfast Program?

nativethoughts:

If you read the FBI files you will see that even Mr. J. Edgar Hoover himself had to say that it was not the guns that were the greatest threat to the internal security of the United States of America; it was not the guns, it was the Free Children’s Breakfast Program that was the greatest threat to the internal security of the United States of America. Grits. Now why was it the Free Children’s Breakfast Program?

(via elli-vanelli)

"A Letter from Huey Newton...about the Women’s Liberation and Gay Liberation Movements"

darkjez:

I felt this text needed to be featured in it’s entirety. Please read! I know it’s long but do it or me? Pwease? …It’s really touching a deep place in my heart. 
     **Emphasis & Italicization Mine

HUEY P. NEWTON—

During the past few years strong movements have developed among women and among homosexuals seeking their liberation. There has been some uncertainty about how to relate to these movements.

Whatever your personal opinions and your insecurities about homosexuality and the various liberation movements among homosexuals and women (and I speak of the homosexuals and women as oppressed groups), we should try to unite with them in a revolutionary fashion. I say “whatever your insecurities are” because as we very well know, sometimes our first instinct is to want to hit a homosexual in the mouth, and want a woman to be quiet. We want to hit a homosexual in the mouth because we are afraid that we might be homosexual; and we want to hit the women or shut her up because we are afraid that she might castrate us, or take the nuts that we might not have to start with.

We must gain security in ourselves and therefore have respect and feelings for all oppressed people. We must not use the racist attitude that the White racists use against our people because they are Black and poor. Many times the poorest White person is the most racist because he is afraid that he might lose something, or discover something that he does not have. So you’re some kind of a threat to him. This kind of psychology is in operation when we view oppressed people and we are angry with them because of their particular kind of behavior, or their particular kind of deviation from the established norm.

Remember, we have not established a revolutionary value system; we are only in the process of establishing it. I do not remember our ever constituting any value that said that a revolutionary must say offensive things towards homosexuals, or that a revolutionary should make sure that women do not speak out about their own particular kind of oppression. As a matter of fact, it is just the opposite: we say that we recognize the women’s right to be free. We have not said much about the homosexual at all, but we must relate to the homosexual movement because it is a real thing. And I know through reading, and through my life experience and observations that homosexuals are not given freedom and liberty by anyone in the society. They might be the most oppressed people in the society.

And what made them homosexual? Perhaps it’s a phenomenon that I don’t understand entirely. Some people say that it is the decadence of capitalism. I don’t know if that is the case; I rather doubt it. But whatever the case is, we know that homosexuality is a fact that exists, and we must understand it in its purest form: that is, a person should have the freedom to use his body in whatever way he wants.

That is not endorsing things in homosexuality that we wouldn’t view as revolutionary. But there is nothing to say that a homosexual cannot also be a revolutionary. And maybe I’m now injecting some of my prejudice by saying that “even a homosexual can be a revolutionary.” Quite the contrary, maybe a homosexual could be the most revolutionary.

When we have revolutionary conferences, rallies, and demonstrations, there should be full participation of the gay liberation movement and the women’s liberation movement. Some groups might be more revolutionary than others. We should not use the actions of a few to say that they are all reactionary or counterrevolutionary, because they are not.

We should deal with the factions just as we deal with any other group or party that claims to be revolutionary. We should try to judge, somehow, whether they are operating in a sincere revolutionary fashion and from a really oppressed situation. (And we will grant that if they are women they are probably oppressed.) If they do things that are unrevolutionary or counterrevolutionary, then criticize that action. If we feel that the group in spirit means to be revolutionary in practice, but they make mistakes in interpretation of the revolutionary philosophy, or they do not understand the dialectics of the social forces in operation, we should criticize that and not criticize them because they are women trying to be free. And the same is true for homosexuals. We should never say a whole movement is dishonest when in fact they are trying to be honest. They are just making honest mistakes. Friends are allowed to make mistakes. The enemy is not allowed to make mistakes because his whole existence is a mistake, and we suffer from it. But the women’s liberation front and gay liberation front are our friends, they are our potential allies, and we need as many allies as possible.

We should be willing to discuss the insecurities that many people have about homosexuality. When I say “insecurities,” I mean the fear that they are some kind of threat to our manhood. I can understand this fear. Because of the long conditioning process which builds insecurity in the American male, homosexuality might produce certain hang-ups in us. I have hang-ups myself about male homosexuality. But on the other hand, I have no hang-up about female homosexuality. And that is a phenomenon in itself. I think it is probably because male homosexuality is a threat to me and female homosexuality is not.

We should be careful about using those terms that might turn our friends off. The terms “faggot” and “punk” should be deleted from our vocabulary, and especially we should not attach names normally designed for homosexuals to men who are enemies of the people, such as Nixon or Mitchell. Homosexuals are not enemies of the people.

We should try to form a working coalition with the gay liberation and women’s liberation groups. We must always handle social forces in the most appropriate manner

colormysoul:

“We didn’t lose in the 60’s … we just didn’t finish the job” - Richard Aoki. 
Not all of the Panther’s were black. He’s a forgotten part of the movement. Not just the Black Panther Movement but the civil rights movement. 
I just watched the documentary about him a few days ago and it really opened my eyes. People need to watch this. HERE is the trailer. Watch it. it’s worth it. 

colormysoul:

“We didn’t lose in the 60’s … we just didn’t finish the job” - Richard Aoki. 

Not all of the Panther’s were black. He’s a forgotten part of the movement. Not just the Black Panther Movement but the civil rights movement. 

I just watched the documentary about him a few days ago and it really opened my eyes. People need to watch this. HERE is the trailer. Watch it. it’s worth it. 

(via blackculture)