"Whereas Asian women are seen as biologically disposed to being subservient, black women are presented as the very opposite. The idea that black women lack the traditional feminine quality of subservience is not something that porn invented; it has been around for some years and has at times found its way into governmental reports, most notably the Moynihan Report (1965), which blamed black poverty on black women’s emasculation of black men.’ As ridiculous as this is, black women in particular, and the black community in general, have paid a heavy price for the pathologizing of black women as unrestrained “bitches” steamrollering over black men. Now, in porn, these women get their comeuppance.

As they are in the rest of society, black women are unequally treated in the industry, often earning less than their white female counterparts for the same acts and scenes; very few black women actually become well known and are thus denied the added wealth that comes with having a name in the industry. In his book on the black porn industry, Lawrence Ross quotes the well-known black porn actor Lexington Steele as saying: “In a boy/girl scene, one girl one guy, no anal sex, the market dictates a minimum of $800 to $900 per scene for the girl…. Now a white girl will start at $800 and go up from there, but a black girl will have to start at $500, and then hit a ceiling of about $800. So the black girl hits a ceiling at the white girl’s minimum.”"

Gail Dines, Pornland: How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality (via wretchedoftheearth)

"In American popular culture, black women often appear among white women as magical figures. These modern mammies, like their nineteenth-century counterparts, are capable of solving white women’s personal crises without ever hinting at the depth of their own oppressive circumstances. For example, the modern Mammy made several guest appearances on the wildly popular HBO series Sex and the City. Though living in New York City, the lead characters—four white women—rarely encountered black women. The few African American women written into the script appeared briefly, with little character development, and were often capable of magically comforting the white women and solving their problems. A black woman chauffeur takes Carrie Bradshaw out for a midnight meal after her book party. Her presence immediately soothes Carrie, who has reported in an earlier scene that her ‘‘loneliness is palpable.’’ After Miranda becomes a single mother and has trouble quieting her colicky baby, the Emmy-winning actress Lisa Gay Hamilton shows up as a neighbor, never seen before or after, to assist her. She brings a vibrating chair that immediately quiets the infant, reinforcing the notion that black women instinctively understand child rearing in ways that white women do not. When the first film version of Sex and the City hit theaters in the summer of 2008, Academy Award–winning actress Jennifer Hudson was cast as Carrie’s feisty young assistant. Although her movie role is much more significant than the sister cameos in the series, Hudson’s ‘‘Louise’’ is able to fix her boss’s love life, website, and personal files even though she is two decades younger. These updates of the Mammy caricature are hardly limited to Sex and the City. Contemporary popular culture is replete with black women characters with an instinctive ability to ‘‘help Whites get in touch with their better selves.’’"

Melissa Harris-Perry Sister Citizen; Shame, Stereotypes and Black Women in America (via brashblacknonbeliever)

(Source: womanistgamergirl, via alostbird)

harriet-ben-twerkin-on-da-rr:

str8nochaser:

theblackamericanprincess:

racialicious:

Y’all know we were kinda stoked about Octavia Spencer’s sexy-babe Elle cover, right? Come to find out that it’s not going to be on the newsstands but only available to subscribers. The newsstands will get the cover with Sarah Jessica Parker on it.
O_o 

Not on newstands??? Wish I could be surprised.

Fuck you, Elle

harriet-ben-twerkin-on-da-rr:

str8nochaser:

theblackamericanprincess:

racialicious:

Y’all know we were kinda stoked about Octavia Spencer’s sexy-babe Elle cover, right? Come to find out that it’s not going to be on the newsstands but only available to subscribers. The newsstands will get the cover with Sarah Jessica Parker on it.

O_o 

Not on newstands??? Wish I could be surprised.

Fuck you, Elle

(via jackie-r-stole-3rd-an-a-2piece-)

sourcedumal:

cosplayingwhileblack:

X
Character: Fem! Geordi La Forge
Series: Star Trek

sourcedumal:

cosplayingwhileblack:

X

Character: Fem! Geordi La Forge

Series: Star Trek

queeq:

Janelle Monae is now a Covergirl? Wicked

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

Southside Remittances: In light of that hatin' White bitch's bullshit NYT article about Gabby's momma

kashbran:

witchsistah:

I’m reminded of how often WW have created a negative, competitive atmosphere with me, meaning they are the ones that initiated it and I wasn’t even thinking that way.  I’m usually just trying to get through my day and suddenly here’s this shifty-acting White chick all salty over me because of some racist misogynistic, anti-BW bullshit she’s got going on in HER head.  It’s the heffa who smugly mentions her address when she finds out I and my husband have a house in one of the most desirable neighborhoods in town.  It’s the chick who’s suddenly cold to me when she finds out I’m married AND my husband is White.  It’s the ganch who wants to treat me like I’m at home barefoot in the kitchen and makes all sorts of passive-aggressive remarks when she finds out I am a housewife who doesn’t have to work outside the home when I never in any way presented myself as such.  And I’m left scratching and then shaking my head because I never came at her the way she’s coming at me.

It’s the White bitch who schemes, and all too often succeeds, in getting rid of the Black woman at the job who the guys think is attractive/smart/competent.  The fellas in the mailroom think you’re dope?  It doesn’t matter if this chick is an account executive, you’re about to be gone.  Dress too good for a Black woman?  Obviously, you’re making WAY too much money.  Better talk to the higher ups about cutting your salary or eliminating your job.  Get a compliment about how you do your job from a higher up?  She’ll make sure to meticulously document and broadcast any and every mistake you ever make even if she’s not in your department, even if she’s not your boss, even if she’s the same level as you!

And the thing is, we never realize till the end, or near it, that we were in a competition.  A Miss America on meth.  We thought we were just working a job or talking with peers.  We didn’t know that by not living a low-down, perpetually suffering, dingy, dirty properly shitty Black woman life in front of White women we had enrolled ourselves in a best-woman contest.

And that’s the thing.  We don’t even have to be living absolutely fabulous, lifestyles-of-the-rich-and-famous lives.  Just not appearing to be ground down into pulp is enough to raise WW’s ire at us.  I worked with a chick who had the nerve to be unpleasantly shocked that I live in a HOUSE.  I didn’t last in that job.  I’ve had WW turn on me when they found out I spoke foreign languages and had traveled and studied overseas.  I’ve seen the green eyed monster from WW when a WM guessed my chrono age to be 15 years younger (and then he really killed ol’ girl with “I thought you were 27 AT THE MOST”) than my actual one.   Hell, I’ve gotten hate from being a housewife and not out there totin’ someone’s barge and liftin’ someone’s bail.

WW have always competed with BW since we arrived on American shores.  Sumptuary laws were passed in America so that BW’s looks and beauty would not rival WW’s.  There were some places where BW were not allowed to wear the elaborate hats and hairstyles WW were affecting.  We could only wear scarves as head coverings.  Those laws were a bust as BW learned how to rock the looks they were allowed to perfection.  We wrapped our heads with such eclat that we all too often caught the eyes of WW’s husbands, fathers and brothers despite the laws desperately trying to give WW a head start in feminine pulchritude. 

The fact that bs article was a WW trying to pit herself against a Black mother was just another instance of WW trying to force BW into competition with them and then trying to twist the rules, change them midway, stack the deck and straight up cheat their way into first place.  Mostly, they just don’t tell you they’re competing even as they do every dirty trick in the book.  It’s like someone deciding to race you by just taking off running and not telling you when to start, where the finish line is or even that you’re racing in the first place all the while strewing tacks and nails all in your way while they’re running.

It’s funny to me, because WW’s insecurity regarding BW is always just under the surface in our relations with each other.  It’s a huge component as to why BW can’t trust WW.  It’s why so many BW are not interested in joining WW’s movements and organizations.  It’s not that we don’t understand feminism or disagree with its fundamental ideology.  It’s that we know you all’s virulent insecurity vis a vis your feelings of White superiority vs. Black women’s capabilities will erupt all over us and we’ll be the victim.  The fact that you all react so outsize to it, messing with and endangering BW’s livelihoods, health, wealth, families make dealing with it and you all so not worth the effort or chance.


I gotta get ready for this in life.

sooolondon:

alostbird:

loudblackram:

ishmaelgaynor:

These comic strips are the truth well some of them at least

ALL OF THESE COMICS ARE BULLSHIT. TOTAL AND COMPLETE FUCKING NICE GUY MISOGYNISTIC BULLSHIT!

I don’t know who makes these comics but I hope they get hit by a car. 

This is the nice guy (tm) Black men addition
The poor fucks that believe this shit. Anything to stroke their ego and blame all the ills of the world on Black women. Poor “nice” Black guy. Why won’t anyone suck your dick? There is NO WAY in the world you’re a prick. Nope! You don’t come off like and insufferable bastard whose company most people wouldn’t enjoy. Its EVERYONE ELSE and never you. You totes don’t sound like a piece of work. 
Its doesn’t matter you don’t have a working grasp of structural oppression, reality and more often than not you perpetuate oppressive shit. You’re totes enlightened 

sooolondon:

alostbird:

loudblackram:

ishmaelgaynor:

These comic strips are the truth well some of them at least

ALL OF THESE COMICS ARE BULLSHIT. TOTAL AND COMPLETE FUCKING NICE GUY MISOGYNISTIC BULLSHIT!

I don’t know who makes these comics but I hope they get hit by a car. 

This is the nice guy (tm) Black men addition

The poor fucks that believe this shit. Anything to stroke their ego and blame all the ills of the world on Black women. Poor “nice” Black guy. Why won’t anyone suck your dick? There is NO WAY in the world you’re a prick. Nope! You don’t come off like and insufferable bastard whose company most people wouldn’t enjoy. Its EVERYONE ELSE and never you. You totes don’t sound like a piece of work. 

Its doesn’t matter you don’t have a working grasp of structural oppression, reality and more often than not you perpetuate oppressive shit. You’re totes enlightened 

(via sugahwaatah)

bad-dominicana:

its not long enough to be a manifesto, but it should be: the orifice on this black woman’s body can speak and will…

navigatethestream:

faineemae:

Dear Nicki Minaj,

Next time you dress yourself in animal print clothing and dance around in a cage while being a colored woman, you should realize that you the result of years and years of male-dominated media stereotyping colored women as exotic, hypersexual, promiscuous, animal-like things. Not even human, just things, objects. Hope you’re proud of yourself and how you make colored women look. So, next time…just don’t.

Sincerely,
a disappointed young woman. 

Dear faineemae,

As somebody who is an African American woman and not necessarily a fan of Nicki Minaj, it pains me when non-African American people attempt to talk about our hyper-sexualization and our objectification. It pains me because most often they have not educated themselves about the history associated with the hyper-sexualization and objectification of black women’s bodies. They have not done the research necessary to understand its origins in our society, in what societal dynamics this occurs, what constructs are at play, and the effects it has had on African American women over the course of American history. Instead, cases like Nicki Minaj are often times inappropriately used as umbrella examples as to how the behaviour of one is affecting us all.   

I, like many of us, have a voice. I am perfectly capable of saying what about Nicki Minaj’s representation bothers me and how I perceive it affects the representation of African American women in mass media. I am perfectly capable of saying that who Nicki Minaj chooses to be in the limelight does and does not have a bearing on my black woman’s body. But the onus isn’t on her to change her behaviour for the sake of black women everywhere. The onus is on society to stop the continued pattern of hyper sexualization and objectification of black women’s bodies which has existed longer than you or i or Nicki Minaj have been alive. The onus is on society to stop viewing black women’s bodies as merely objects for the taking and at the same time stop associating them solely with their sexuality. It is possible to be a sexual being and not have your identity totally wound up in the manifestation of such sexual expression. Yet black women have not enjoyed such individuality or bodily autonomy in this country and dare i say in on this planet. And if we continue to point the looking glass in the wrong direction, then we never will. We will always be body policing ourselves, afraid of whether our appearance or behaviour is sending a larger message to an uncritical audience unwilling to look at the whole person and not part of the person as a reflection on the whole group.  

We, African American women, have been speaking to our oppression when it comes to our representation in mass media for years. We have published books, articles, spoken in documentaries and interviews. The problem is that people don’t listen, or their late to the larger conversational party and talk over us, talk over the scholarship we have done in an attempt to pretty much say the same thing and they garner more attention because they have no connection to the identity of being an African American woman. They are not black, so people will listen to them before listening to us. 

Just as you are not black, and people have listened and reblogged your post instead of listening and talking to us about how we feel. And when African American people and our allies have expressed discontent over your post, pointing out the flaws in your argument, instead of being heard they get swept into the category of “haters who will just keep on hating”, people who have no right to their hurt or anger or their feelings. 

And for the fact that our comments get swept into the dust basket of “hateration” continues the silencing of black women’s voices, shuts down the ability for non-black women like yourself to understand the seriousness of such critical issues as they are related to our livelihood, shuts down the opportunity for you to listen to us, and allows you and others to walk away with the impression that silencing is okay, talking over us is okay, talking about our issues using our women and our representation and our bodies without understanding all the facts is okay. When quite frankly…..its not. 

I personally don’t think you should delete your tumblr. At the same time i was deeply offended by your post about Nicki Minaj i don’t think its worth deleting your tumblr over. You don’t deserve the hateful comments, but if you delete your tumblr i don’t think you’ll ever understand why this is such a hot button issue. 

Tumblr provides you with a unique and rare opportunity to learn from people about their own oppressions from their own raw voices. Don’t allow the guise of “hateration” or the cult of personality that exists around you to blind you to such a unique and rare learning opportunity. I think you’d make a fine ally to black women, but its not something that happens overnight. It’s not something that happens because you have African American female friends who agree with you or because people are willing to sing your praises before challenging your ideas. It begins with discomfort, it begins with that internal twisting which wants to believe you have all the right intentions and the right desires for changing the world but maybe you lack the knowledge and the real world experience of being an African American woman. It begins with understanding that you only know so much and that’s okay because nobody is judging you on what you don’t know but more or less what you’re not willing to learn. 

It begins somewhere, but delete your tumblr and it never begins. Shut out people with valid axes to grind and the evolution of your ideas will never come into fruition. 

sincerely

Ari 

(via wretchedoftheearth)

"What had begun as “race music,” made for and by people as dark as me, had now transferred ownership into the hands of white boys and girls. And even though it was still OK for those same kids to listen to rap and r & b, I was not supposed to be rocking out to their music. Black girls had no place in the rock and roll hierarchy. I knew white men were the guys in charge. That much was clear. Their job was to piss off parents, wear the flashiest outfits, play the hardest riffs, do the hardest drugs and fuck as many (white) girls as possible. Women? They weren’t in the band. They were “with the band.” White girls were groupies who flung panties on stage and gave blowjobs on crowded tour buses. I didn’t know where black girls were supposed to go."

Kristina Gray, “I Sold My Soul to Rock and Roll” (via wretchedoftheearth)

madamethursday:

[Image: A gif of actress Gina Torres, a beautiful Black Latina, speaking and gesturing to illustrate her point.]
fuckyeahginatorres:


When I became an actress I quickly realize that the world liked their latinos to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts. I was going up for African American parts. […] Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language better and understood the culture better, those weren’t the parts that…I could take seriously. Suddenly you have to explain why I look how I look. And then it gets complicated. And nobody wants complicated.

Gina Torres | Black & Latino

madamethursday:

[Image: A gif of actress Gina Torres, a beautiful Black Latina, speaking and gesturing to illustrate her point.]

fuckyeahginatorres:

When I became an actress I quickly realize that the world liked their latinos to look Italian. Not like me. So I wasn’t going up for Latina parts. I was going up for African American parts. […] Regardless of the fact that I spoke the language better and understood the culture better, those weren’t the parts that…I could take seriously. Suddenly you have to explain why I look how I look. And then it gets complicated. And nobody wants complicated.

Gina Torres | Black & Latino

(via tranqualizer)

sourcedumal:

geekeryandhockey:

Because things THIS BADASS must be shared with as many people as possible!

Cosplay credits:

Nubia - Jay Justice

Artemis - Ann McManus

Kingdom Come Diana - Natalie Dawn

Wonder Woman - Lihyen Faye

Donna Troy - Cookie Layne

Cheetah - Shemika Berry

Pictures by Wes Barthlow, Bree Smith, Cookie Layne and Vincent Tyson (from FB)

sourcedumal:

chrilliams:

The King and Queen of Wakanda

Heroes of the Earth

Black, Mutant, Powerful.

Black Panther and Storm

(Source: trilliamsdotcom)

digital-images:

Happy Birthday to Civil Rights activist Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (b. February 4, 1913)

(Source: afro-art-chick, via xanthophiliac)

kemetically-ankhtified:

All hail the mother eve of the seas and land.

kemetically-ankhtified:

All hail the mother eve of the seas and land.

(Source: theonlymagicleftisart, via squeetothegee-deactivated201111)

Do you know who Sarah “Saatije” Baartman is?

unapproachableblackchicks:

I do …. but let the world know!! 

The Hottentot Venus (Saartjie Baartman) became the focus of scientific debate over racial inferiority waged at the Paris Academy of Science. Baartman was exhibited in carnival-like shows across Britain that sensationalized her unusual anatomy: she had steatopygia, an over-development of fatty tissue around the buttocks, a trait common to Hottentot women, which led to her misidentification. She also had extended labia minora, the so-called “Hottentot apron.” A court battle failed to free Baartman from her exhibitors, and in 1814 she was taken to Paris. Her remains were preserved and exhibited in Paris until 1985, and were finally returned to South Africa at the request of Nelson Mandela in 2002. 
>Image Credits