freshmouthgoddess:

a-tropical-elf:

medusamirabal:

Junot Diaz on….well, things that are real for 1st/2nd generation immigrants of Dominican parents.

He touches on how there’s a whisper in every immigrant when they return to their country of origin that tells them “You don’t belong here [anymore]”.

Welp. 

I know it, I feel it. My blog bio has attempted to describe. (Can’t believe I just found this particular video just now).

“You don’t belong here [anymore]”.

I’m landing in DR in a few hours. I been thinking this for weeks. Kinda hurt to see it written, vocalized, validated.

Jumot Diaz knows my life.. sometime you just can’t live/go back home again

(via aliveforalittlewhile)

soulbrotherv2:

The Wanderer: The Last American Slave Ship and the Conspiracy That Set Its Sails by Erick Calonius
On Nov. 28, 1858, a ship called the Wanderer slipped silently into a coastal channel and unloaded its cargo of over 400 African slaves onto Jekyll Island, Georgia, thirty eight years after the African slave trade had been made illegal. It was the last ship ever to bring a cargo of African slaves to American soil. 
Built in 1856, the Wanderer began life as a luxury racing yacht, flying the pennant of the New York Yacht Club and cited as the successor to the famous yacht America. But within a year of its creation, the Wanderer was secretly converted into a slave ship, and, with the New York Yacht Club pennant still flying above as a diversion, sailed off to Africa. The Wanderer’s mission was meant to be more than a slaving venture, however. It was designed by its radical conspirators to defy the federal government and speed the nation’s descent into civil war.
The New York Times first reported the story as a hoax; however, as groups of Africans began to appear in the small towns surrounding Savannah, the story of the Wanderer began to leak out; igniting a fire of protest and debate that made headlines throughout the nation and across the Atlantic.
As the story shifts between Savannah, Jekyll Island, the Congo River, London, and New York City, the Wanderer’s tale is played out in heated Southern courtrooms, the offices of the New York Times, The White House, the slave markets of Africa and some of the most charming homes Southern royalty had to offer.  In a gripping account of the high seas and the high life in New York and Savannah, Erik Calonius brings to light one of the most important and little remembered stories of the Civil War period. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

The Wanderer: The Last American Slave Ship and the Conspiracy That Set Its Sails by Erick Calonius

On Nov. 28, 1858, a ship called the Wanderer slipped silently into a coastal channel and unloaded its cargo of over 400 African slaves onto Jekyll Island, Georgia, thirty eight years after the African slave trade had been made illegal. It was the last ship ever to bring a cargo of African slaves to American soil. 

Built in 1856, the Wanderer began life as a luxury racing yacht, flying the pennant of the New York Yacht Club and cited as the successor to the famous yacht America. But within a year of its creation, the Wanderer was secretly converted into a slave ship, and, with the New York Yacht Club pennant still flying above as a diversion, sailed off to Africa. The Wanderer’s mission was meant to be more than a slaving venture, however. It was designed by its radical conspirators to defy the federal government and speed the nation’s descent into civil war.

The New York Times first reported the story as a hoax; however, as groups of Africans began to appear in the small towns surrounding Savannah, the story of the Wanderer began to leak out; igniting a fire of protest and debate that made headlines throughout the nation and across the Atlantic.

As the story shifts between Savannah, Jekyll Island, the Congo River, London, and New York City, the Wanderer’s tale is played out in heated Southern courtrooms, the offices of the New York Times, The White House, the slave markets of Africa and some of the most charming homes Southern royalty had to offer.  In a gripping account of the high seas and the high life in New York and Savannah, Erik Calonius brings to light one of the most important and little remembered stories of the Civil War period. [book link]

neverdowhattheydo:

theredvirgin:

A beginning is a very delicate time. Know then, that is is the year 10191. The known universe is ruled by the Padishah Emperor Shaddam the Fourth, my father. In this time, the most precious substance in the universe is the spice Melange. The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The spice is vital to space travel. The Spacing Guild and its navigators, who the spice has mutated over 4000 years, use the orange spice gas, which gives them the ability to fold space. That is, travel to any part of the universe without moving. Oh, yes. I forgot to tell you. The spice exists on only one planet in the entire universe. A desolate, dry planet with vast deserts. Hidden away within the rocks of these deserts are a people known as the Fremen, who have long held a prophecy that a man would come, a messiah, who would lead them to true freedom. The planet is Arrakis, also known as Dune.

Going to read the books again. ^.^


ii hate seeing white freemen. they were like the only explicitly poc group of ppl in the entire dune universe of a thousand planets of humanity….why you gotta draw them white?

neverdowhattheydo:

theredvirgin:

A beginning is a very delicate time. Know then, that is is the year 10191. The known universe is ruled by the Padishah Emperor Shaddam the Fourth, my father. In this time, the most precious substance in the universe is the spice Melange. The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The spice is vital to space travel. The Spacing Guild and its navigators, who the spice has mutated over 4000 years, use the orange spice gas, which gives them the ability to fold space. That is, travel to any part of the universe without moving. Oh, yes. I forgot to tell you. The spice exists on only one planet in the entire universe. A desolate, dry planet with vast deserts. Hidden away within the rocks of these deserts are a people known as the Fremen, who have long held a prophecy that a man would come, a messiah, who would lead them to true freedom. The planet is Arrakis, also known as Dune.


Going to read the books again. ^.^

ii hate seeing white freemen. they were like the only explicitly poc group of ppl in the entire dune universe of a thousand planets of humanity….why you gotta draw them white?

(via queensoucouyant)

"Stay Away From My Elves": Racism in Epic Fantasy Fandoms-Damned if you Do, Damned if You Don’t.

queennubian:

ai-yo:

girljanitor:

image

Wistful POC make a photoset POC fancast for Lord of the Rings. White people :

Like I said before, I think adding poc into things JUST for the purpose of inclusion is just as bad. But I don’t think adding them in to a fantasy story that has been around for decades with a very strong and dedicated following is the right way to do it. This isn’t about racism, this is about fucking with my fandom.

Stay away from my elves.

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An author of color writes a book featuring POC protagonists. White People:

I’m all for being happy that a black person wrote a fantasy book with black protagonists, just as themselves, largely (though not entirely) away from any color related power struggles, letting them exist on their own merit and showing the obvious fact that fantasy characters don’t all have to be pale.

It would be nice if the responses weren’t “FUCK YEAR! FINALLY A BOOK FOR US! TAKE THAT YOU HORRIBLE, BORING WHITEYS”.

However I do fail to see how ‘race isn’t a conflict’ as someone (I think) mentioned above, when it’s really just about black supremacy, not white supremacy. BUT HEY DON’T MIND ME. I prefer not to read fantasy with an agenda, even if it’s in my favor.

I’ll reserve my adulation for a black writer who is above being racist entirely. I do not withhold judgment based on skin color.

Making it clear that White villains are only bad if the Protagonists are POC:

You know, I kinda have a problem with this, as well. I’m white, but one thing I’ve made a major point in my life is to never see skin color. If you had told me this book was part of a wonderful fantasy series that would have been fine. If you had told me the protagonists were people of color and the antagonists where white: still fine. But you had to drive home the thought that it’s so superior just for those reasons, and that’s unsettling.

imageimage

A white author writes black characters which are subsequently whitewashed by white fans. White people:

I mean seriously, you SJS Skidmarks whine and bitch about how authors don’t include enough “non-white” characters in their books. Then when an author DOES do so, you whine and bitch because they aren’t the star or the main character. And when an author makes one a pretty important character you complain about THAT.

Seriously, kindly write “racist” on a club and beat yourself to death with it. It’s what you want, anyways, but no one would likely care enough to humor you. You can make the club any color you want, though I think we can all guess what color it’d be. Funny thing is, regardless of that? It’d still be stupid and incredibly ironic.

Ursula K. LeGuin writes a Black main character in The Left Hand of Darkness, a seminal Gender studies text and all-around awesome sci fi book. White people:

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Ursula K. LeGuin writes an entire World full of people with “reddish-brown” or “blue-black” skin. There is quite literally only ONE white character (Tenar). White people make a TV miniseries:

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I take it that everyone remembers the racist shitstorm over Rue and Thresh? No?

“Naturally Thresh would be a black man,” tweeted someone who called herself @lovelyplease.

“I was pumped about the Hunger Games. Until I learned that a black girl was playing Rue,” wrote @JohnnyKnoxIV.

“Why is Rue a little black girl?” @FrankeeFresh demanded to know. (she appended her tweet with the hashtag admonishment #sticktothebookDUDE.)

“Awkward moment when Rue is some black girl and not the little blonde innocent girl you picture,”@sw4q

“Kk call me racist but when I found out rue was black her death wasn’t as sad,” wrote @JashperParas

But wait! Let’s not forget the Fan-made movie that was uploaded and waddled its way around the internet well before the ACTUAL film came out, which has OVER 3 MILLION VIEWS AND FEATURES A BLONDE, WHITE RUE, AS WELL AS DOZENS OF COMMENTS REGARDING HOW MUCH “BETTER” IT IS THAN THE ACTUAL HOLLYWOOD MOVIE

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According to the filmmaker:

I know that Rue is described as being dark skinned in the book, but I wanted to show Savanna’s acting. I think she would make a good Prim though.

The commenters:

Everytime I watch this, I always think it was so much better than the movie. This vid is just epic. It captures the whole feeling of the book. It’s realistic, and for that reason it’s completely awesome.

Personally, I like this version better than the one in the movie. It’s more emotional, it feels more realistic, and the actors here acted better, especially Rue.

Why is this better than the movie?! I cried! I didn’t cry for the movie.

This was more sad when rue died than in the actual movie! still loved it though!

rue is so beautiful

Okay, so….

Recap.

White people: “STAY AWAY FROM MY ELVES!!!”

White people: “I’ll reserve my adulation for a black writer who is above being racist entirely.”

White people:

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White people:

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(via dynastylnoire)

myimaginarybrooklyn:

Paul Gilroy, There Ain’t No Black In The Union Jack.

myimaginarybrooklyn:

Paul Gilroy, There Ain’t No Black In The Union Jack.

(via blueklectic)

nijireiki:

fussybabybitch:

i thought of a post

The Bailey School Kids drop some knowledge.

nijireiki:

fussybabybitch:

i thought of a post

The Bailey School Kids drop some knowledge.

(via princessnijireiki)

fyeahcontroversialcharacters:

  • Character: Rue
  • Fandom: The Hunger Games
  • Reason for Being Hated: Fans didn’t realize until the movie was casted that she was black even though it was mentioned in the book twice. [SPOILER] This made her death “not as sad” because she wasn’t an “innocent blonde white girl.” [/SPOILER] Hunger Games Tweets has lots of links regarding this controversy.

(via queensoucouyant)

fer1972:

Vennesla Architecture Library and Cultural House, Norway

(via threewicklow)

deafmuslimpunx:

Indian author Pankaj Mishra. (Photo: V. Ganesa) (source: The Hindu)
^ I gotta have a copy of this new book.

 The book is about a fascinating period in Asian history, the 19th and early 20th centuries when men and women were formulating a response to that very aggressive presence in their lives: Western colonialism and imperialism. They are fairly obscure figures, not men valorised in history text books such as Gandhi, Nehru or Mao Zedong. Men like Jamal al-Afghani and Liang Qichao and there are reasons why they are not as famous as the men they inspired later. “They are not known much,” Pankaj says, “because they don’t belong to the kind of triumphalist nationalist narratives, both of the West and the East. The histories we are told are nationalist histories and they talk about the emergence of the nation state from Western imperialism and they talk of the generation that led that struggle and the mass movements and then assumed power when the Europeans left. But these were the first generation and because they incarnated so many political ideas and tendencies, they almost seem like, in retrospect, confused or incoherent figures as opposed to the people like Mao Zedong who came later.”
Why the choice of these men to tell the story of Asia’s response to colonialism? Because, sometimes marginal figures tell you more about historical moments and their societies. When one reads about the histories of Egypt or China in the late 19th or early 20th centuries, he says, one keeps coming across references to these men. Both were born in traditional Asian families but were curious about the politics and ideologies of their time and were great travellers. But one never gets to know more. Who exactly are they as persons, politically, intellectually, what was the larger shape and trajectories of their lives? One never got a sense of what their journeys were. But there were connections between them. Liang Qichao admired Tagore who himself had travelled to Cairo to meet one of al-Afghani’s disciples and “suddenly as I read more widely, this world of Asia began to emerge more systematic than before in its response to the West.”

deafmuslimpunx:

Indian author Pankaj Mishra. (Photo: V. Ganesa) (source: The Hindu)

^ I gotta have a copy of this new book.

The book is about a fascinating period in Asian history, the 19th and early 20th centuries when men and women were formulating a response to that very aggressive presence in their lives: Western colonialism and imperialism. They are fairly obscure figures, not men valorised in history text books such as Gandhi, Nehru or Mao Zedong. Men like Jamal al-Afghani and Liang Qichao and there are reasons why they are not as famous as the men they inspired later. “They are not known much,” Pankaj says, “because they don’t belong to the kind of triumphalist nationalist narratives, both of the West and the East. The histories we are told are nationalist histories and they talk about the emergence of the nation state from Western imperialism and they talk of the generation that led that struggle and the mass movements and then assumed power when the Europeans left. But these were the first generation and because they incarnated so many political ideas and tendencies, they almost seem like, in retrospect, confused or incoherent figures as opposed to the people like Mao Zedong who came later.”

Why the choice of these men to tell the story of Asia’s response to colonialism? Because, sometimes marginal figures tell you more about historical moments and their societies. When one reads about the histories of Egypt or China in the late 19th or early 20th centuries, he says, one keeps coming across references to these men. Both were born in traditional Asian families but were curious about the politics and ideologies of their time and were great travellers. But one never gets to know more. Who exactly are they as persons, politically, intellectually, what was the larger shape and trajectories of their lives? One never got a sense of what their journeys were. But there were connections between them. Liang Qichao admired Tagore who himself had travelled to Cairo to meet one of al-Afghani’s disciples and “suddenly as I read more widely, this world of Asia began to emerge more systematic than before in its response to the West.”

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista, via kadalkavithaigal)

"OUT is a novel that is too controversial for the traditional publishing world. But we want to get it out there, and we need funds to publish paper copies of the book and to publicize it. It’s due out in October 2012.

It takes place in a world where same-sex couples (Parallels) run the government in close association with a powerful religious organization. Opposite-sex couples (Perpendiculars) are criminalized, sent to rehabilitation camps, and treated as outcasts.

Into this world comes Chris Bryant, son of a powerful minister. Chris has always been faithful to his Anglicant religion – even though he’s never felt like everyone else, never felt…Parallel. And then it happens: he meets her. Carmen. Daughter of one of the leading Perpendicular prosecutors…the girl he knows he can’t live without. Carmen has always thought the treatment of Perps is barbaric – but to actually be one? To fall in love with Chris and openly admit to it is suicide.Their only chance to be together is the Underground, a secret society Chris’s sister introduces him to that is determined to mount an attack against the social restrictions of the Anglicant church. They want to make an example of Chris and Carmen, two Perps from high social families, to become the catalyst for an uprising that will threaten the traditions of their society’s families and church.

But the cost of involvement just might be death for them both.

OUT is a thrilling new young adult speculative fiction novel (yup, that’s right – no apocalyptic cause here, just speculation on conscious survival of the species rather than natural selection) by Laura Preble, author of The Queen Geek Social Club trilogy (Berkley JAM). School Library Journal hailed Laura as “expertly handl[ing] the ups and downs of teenage friendship and romance, as well as…real characters who go through the typical trials of teenage life.”

We need funds to publish copies of the book and to help publicize it. Help us get OUT out there!"

x

I am literally unable to even

(via raphaellaskies)

okay, so this appropriative discrimiflip nonsense needs to stop right now, but

ANGLICANT

(via sophistory)

Goddammit, writers. I’m seriously losing faith in writing right now.

(via seekingpenname)

I lost it at “Anglicant”

(via fuckyeahappo)

wat

(via catbountry)

(Source: ladysaviours, via catbountry)

doveilmiosoldi:

poetsorg:

Joy Harjo has a new memoir.

though the interview is brief, I’d really suggest reading it alongside the excerpt NPR provides (and the whole book!). She has a beautiful way of storytelling. In case you don’t know who Joy Harjo is, she’s a Mvskoke Creek poet from Tulsa, OK—definitely check her work out! I love what she says in the interview about trauma:

At least I’ve had to come to that in my life, to realize that this stuff called failure, this stuff, this debris of historical trauma, family trauma, you know, stuff that can kill your spirit, is actually raw material to make things with and to build a bridge. You can use those materials to build a bridge over that which would destroy you.

doveilmiosoldi:

poetsorg:

Joy Harjo has a new memoir.

though the interview is brief, I’d really suggest reading it alongside the excerpt NPR provides (and the whole book!). She has a beautiful way of storytelling. In case you don’t know who Joy Harjo is, she’s a Mvskoke Creek poet from Tulsa, OK—definitely check her work out! I love what she says in the interview about trauma:

At least I’ve had to come to that in my life, to realize that this stuff called failure, this stuff, this debris of historical trauma, family trauma, you know, stuff that can kill your spirit, is actually raw material to make things with and to build a bridge. You can use those materials to build a bridge over that which would destroy you.

(via theirriandjhiquishow-deactivate)

POT OF GOLD: 95 free Black History e-book package downloads

notaskingforpermission:

The second set of links for each package work better- you can download as many as you want at once and there’s no waiting in-between like with the first set of file-host links.

i just wish the selection was more woman-heavy :/

Read More

(Source: knightsofimhoteplibrary.blogspot.com, via strugglingtobeheard)

fyeahafrica:

My love affair with books - Kopano Matlwa

The EU Literary Award-winning Kopano Matlwa is one of South Africa’s most vibrant young writers. A medical graduate, Kopano is the author of the critically acclaimed novel Coconut. She is a founding member and chairperson of Waiting Room Education by Medical Students, a non-profit organisation run by students and is a 2010 Rhodes Scholar.

(Source: )

"Books are no more threatened by Kindle than stairs by elevators."

Stephen Fry

(via crosseyedcupid)

(Source: thevoicecalledcheesecake, via crosseyedcupid-deactivated20140)

Alice Walker's 'rejection letter' to Israeli publisher

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

June 9, 2012
Dear Publishers at Yediot Books,

Thank you so much for wishing to publish my novel THE COLOR PURPLE.  It isn’t possible for me to permit this at this time for the following reason:  As you may know, last Fall in South Africa the Russell Tribunal on Palestine met and determined that Israel is guilty of apartheid and persecution of the Palestinian people, both inside Israel and also in the Occupied Territories.  The testimony we heard, both from Israelis and Palestinians (I was a jurist) was devastating.  I grew up under American apartheid and this was far worse.  Indeed, many South Africans who attended, including Desmond Tutu, felt the Israeli version of these crimes is worse even than  what they suffered under the white supremacist regimes that dominated South Africa for so long.

It is my hope that the non-violent BDS (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions) movement, of which I am part, will have enough of an impact on Israeli civilian society to change the situation.

In that regard, I offer an earlier example of THE COLOR PURPLE’s engagement in the world-wide effort to rid humanity of its self-destructive habit of dehumanizing whole populations.  When the film of The Color Purple was finished, and all of us who made it decided we loved it, Steven Spielberg, the director, was faced with the decision of whether it should be permitted to travel to and be offered to the South African public.  I lobbied against this idea because, as with Israel today, there was a civil society movement of BDS aimed at changing South Africa’s apartheid policies and, in fact, transforming the government.

It was not a particularly difficult position to hold on my part:  I believe deeply in non-violent methods of social change though they sometimes seem to take forever, but I did regret not being able to share our movie, immediately, with (for instance) Winnie and Nelson Mandela and their children, and also with the widow and children of the brutally murdered, while in police custody, Steven Biko, the visionary journalist and defender of African integrity and freedom.

We decided to wait.  How happy we all were when the apartheid regime was dismantled and Nelson Mandela became the first president of color of South Africa.  

Only then did we send our beautiful movie!  And to this day, when I am in South Africa, I can hold my head high and nothing obstructs the love that flows between me and the people of that country.

Which is to say, I would so like knowing my books are read by the people of your country, especially by the young, and by  the brave Israeli activists (Jewish and Palestinian) for justice and peace I have had the joy of working beside.  I am hopeful that one day, maybe soon, this may happen.  But now is not the time.

We must continue to work on the issue, and to wait.

In faith that a just future can be fashioned from small acts,
Alice Walker