(Source: fyeahcheguevara)

(Source: no-war-but-class-war, via amodernmanifesto)

instinctivepath:

Che Guevara in Gaza.

instinctivepath:

Che Guevara in Gaza.

fuldagap:

Alberto Korda. Che Wearing a Radio Headset.

fuldagap:

Alberto Korda. Che Wearing a Radio Headset.

(via fyeahcheguevara)

fuldagap:

Woman posing and explaining the symbolism behind a statue of Che, found outside local communist party headquarters in Santa Clara, Cuba. A slot found in the back of the statue to accommodate the expanding and shrinking of the statue medium resembles that of a piggy bank. It adds a double entendre that regime has capitalized from the chic imagery of Che Guevara.

fuldagap:

Woman posing and explaining the symbolism behind a statue of Che, found outside local communist party headquarters in Santa Clara, Cuba. A slot found in the back of the statue to accommodate the expanding and shrinking of the statue medium resembles that of a piggy bank. It adds a double entendre that regime has capitalized from the chic imagery of Che Guevara.

(Source: fyeahcheguevara)

"

All this, distinguished delegates, this new will of a whole continent, of Latin America, is made manifest in the cry proclaimed daily by our masses as the irrefutable expression of their decision to fight and to paralyze the armed hand of the invader. It is a cry that has the understanding and support of all the peoples of the world and especially of the socialist camp, headed by the Soviet Union.

That cry is: Patria o muerte! [Homeland or death]

"

Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara, addressing the UN General Assembly in 1964. (via fyeahcheguevara)

Che Guevara

Ernesto (Che) Guevara was born in Rosario in Argentine  in 1928. After studying medicine at the University of Buenos Aires  he worked as a doctor. While in Guatemala  in 1954 he witnessed the socialist government of President Jacobo Arbenz overthrown by an American backed military coup. Disgusted by what he saw, Guevara decided to join the Cuban revolutionary, Fidel Castro, in Mexico .

In 1956 Guevara, Castro and eighty other men and women arrived in Cuba in an attempt to overthrow the government of General Fulgencio Batista. This group became known as the July 26 Movement . The plan was to set up their base in the Sierra Maestra  mountains. On the way to the mountains they were attacked by government troops. By the time they reached the Sierra Maestra there were only sixteen men left with twelve weapons between them. For the next few months Castro’s guerrilla army raided isolated army garrisons and were gradually able to build-up their stock of weapons.

When the guerrillas took control of territory they redistributed the land amongst the peasants. In return, the peasants helped the guerrillas against Batista’s soldiers. In some cases the peasants also joined Castro’s army, as did students from the cities and occasionally Catholic priests.

In an effort to find out information about the rebels people were pulled in for questioning. Many innocent people were tortured. Suspects, including children, were publicly executed and then left hanging in the streets for several days as a warning to others who were considering joining the revolutionaries. The behaviour of Batista’s forces increased support for the guerrillas. In 1958 forty-five organizations signed an open letter supporting the July 26 Movement. National bodies representing lawyers, architects, dentists, accountants and social workers were amongst those who signed. Castro, who had originally relied on the support of the poor, was now gaining the backing of the influential middle classes.

General Fulgencio Batista responded to this by sending more troops to the Sierra Maestra. He now had 10,000 men hunting for Castro and his 300-strong army. Although outnumbered, Castro’s guerrillas were able to inflict defeat after defeat on the government’s troops. In the summer of 1958 over a thousand of Batista’s soldiers were killed or wounded and many more were captured. Unlike Batista’s soldiers, Castro’s troops had developed a reputation for behaving well towards prisoners. This encouraged Batista’s troops to surrender to Castro when things went badly in battle. Complete military units began to join the guerrillas.

The United States  supplied Batista with planes, ships and tanks, but the advantage of using the latest technology such as napalm failed to winthem victory against the guerrillas. In March 1958, President Dwight Eisenhower, disillusioned with Batista’s performance, suggested he held elections. This he did, but the people showed their dissatisfaction with his government by refusing to vote. Over 75 per cent of the voters in the capital Havana boycotted the polls. In some areas, such as Santiago, it was as high as 98 per cent.

Fidel Castro was now confident he could beat Batista in a head-on battle. Leaving the Sierra Maestra mountains, Castro’s troops began to march on the main towns. After consultations with the United States government, Batista decided to flee the country. Senior Generals left behind attempted to set up another military government. Castro’s reaction was to call for a general strike. The workers came out on strike and the military were forced to accept the people’s desire for change. Castro marched into Havana on January 9,1959, and became Cuba’s new leader.

In its first hundred days in office Castro’s government passed several new laws. Rents were cut by up to 50 per cent for low wage earners; property owned by Fulgencio Batista and his ministers was confiscated; the telephone company was nationalized and the rates were reduced by 50 per cent; land was redistributed amongst the peasants (including the land owned by the Castro family); separate facilities for blacks and whites (swimming pools, beaches, hotels, cemeteries etc.) were abolished.

In 1960 Guevara visited China and the Soviet Union. On his return he wrote two books Guerrilla Warfare and Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War. In these books he argued that it was possible to export Cuba’s revolution to other South American countries. Guevara served as Minister for Industries (1961-65) but in April 1965 he resigned and become a guerrilla leader in Bolivia .

In 1967 David Morales recruited Félix Rodríguez to train and head a team that would attempt to catch Che Guevara. Guevara was attempting to persuade the tin-miners living in poverty to join his revolutionary army. When Guevara was captured, it was Rodriguez who interrogated him before he ordered his execution in October, 1967. Rodriguez still possesses Guevara’s Rolex watch that he took as a trophy.

In their book, Ultimate Sacrifice , published in 2006, Larmar Waldron and Thom Hartmann argued that in 1963 Guevara was involved in a plot withJuan Almeida Bosch to overthrow Fidel Castro.

source

(Source: youtube.com, via thepeacefulterrorist)

"We should not go to the people and say, “Here we are. We come to give you the charity of our presence, to teach you our science, to show you your errors, your lack of culture, your ignorance of elementary things.” We should go instead with an inquiring mind and a humble spirit to learn at that great source of wisdom that is the people."

Ernesto Guevara, On Revolutionary Medicine (via fyeahcheguevara)

selucha:

Learning what not to do.

selucha:

Learning what not to do.

(via ppsh-41)

favoritepairofsox:

Like a Boss.

favoritepairofsox:

Like a Boss.

(via vivatuvidaa)

resiststance:

“The first thing to note is                that in my son’s veins flowed the blood of the Irish                rebels”
- Ernesto Guevara, 1969.
Mural in the Bogside area of Derry, Ireland. Che Guevara was the eldest of five children in an Argentine family of Spanish, Basque and Irish descent.

resiststance:

“The first thing to note is that in my son’s veins flowed the blood of the Irish rebels”

- Ernesto Guevara, 1969.

Mural in the Bogside area of Derry, Ireland. Che Guevara was the eldest of five children in an Argentine family of Spanish, Basque and Irish descent.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

collegekidwisdom asked: Please please POR FAVOR more Che Guevara. Yum. :)

CHE GUEVARA APPRECIATION POST, JUST FOR YOU!

(via time-slut)