bankston:

Middle class.

bankston:

Middle class.

americandissident:

Money Talks Too Much

americandissident:

Money Talks Too Much

(Source: )

pseudonym6:

Who Is Ready To Open The Pinata?

pseudonym6:

Who Is Ready To Open The Pinata?

(via rebelsmindet-deactivated2011122)

"

There was a time when I liked a good riot. Put on some heavy old street clothes that could stand a bit of sidewalk-scraping, infect myself with something good and contagious, then go out and stamp on some cops.

It was great, being nine years old.

"

Spider Jerusalem (via onesilentcall)

"Rich people hate class warfare because it’s the only kind of warfare they can’t get poor people to fight for them."

Mike Drucker (via dirkhanson)

(Source: dirkhanson)

heavyaura:

celticthistle:

phroyd:

America’s Next Commodity 

Holy fuck. SO accurate.

Okay, I understand the use of a fat person here to illustrate a point. But it’s still disappointing. Without required fatness (seriously, it’s been a long time since the “kings of industry” have been majority fat), which is of course representing greed, this image would still be capable of suggesting that the white man at the table is one of the upper/upper middle class white supporters of institutionalized/government-sanctioned racism, kyriarchy, patriarchy, and class oppression.

heavyaura:

celticthistle:

phroyd:

America’s Next Commodity 

Holy fuck. SO accurate.

Okay, I understand the use of a fat person here to illustrate a point. But it’s still disappointing. Without required fatness (seriously, it’s been a long time since the “kings of industry” have been majority fat), which is of course representing greed, this image would still be capable of suggesting that the white man at the table is one of the upper/upper middle class white supporters of institutionalized/government-sanctioned racism, kyriarchy, patriarchy, and class oppression.

(via heavyaura-deactivated20111025)

thatwallstreetdude:

Entitlements - for all? Yup!

thatwallstreetdude:

Entitlements - for all? Yup!

(Source: bourbonstyledude, via seriouslyamerica)

"

So capitalism is looting the public sphere. Services that citizens have for a hundred or more years considered to be public goods and not to be exploited for the profit of a few – health care, care of the elderly, education, unemployment benefit, old-age pensions, fresh water, sewers, waste disposal, roads and footpaths, urban and rural planning, the postal service, the telephone service, the police, and so on – are subject to systematic and sustained pressure aimed at breaking the link between the citizen and the service. No longer should we think of these things as ‘ours’, except in the sense that we can say a bank is ours. These things are provided to us as goods and services by companies which exercise their right to make a profit out of them – out of us really, out of our pain, our parent’s old age, our children’s childhood, our money troubles, our environment. Citizens are to be redefined as consumers of services. The sole function of the state is to regulate the activities of companies so that monopolies do not develop.

The police function as the guarantor of profit. The police are ‘ours’ only in the way the taxman is ours. The police thus find themselves increasingly (for it was ever thus) with their backs to the corporate wall facing a disinherited citizenry for whom the state is a hostile force. This makes the police political for it is a mistake to think that the looting of the public sphere by corporations and individuals is not political. Of course, nobody on the corporation side wants to call it that. They want it to be understood as common sense. The state is ‘broken’, they say, or it has ‘failed’. Only profit-making companies can do the job efficiently and give good value for money to the consumer. What they really mean is ‘We’re going to take the money and run’. When you’re down and out, feeling low, check your credit rating.

"

Tottenham and beyond: neoliberal riots and the possibility of politics

(via rumagin)

(via theplaceholder)

"Part of the reason why capitalism looks successful is it’s always had a lot of slave labor, half the population. What women are doing isn’t counted."

Noam Chomsky - Class Warfare: Alternative Radio Interviews Vol. 2 (via bprost)

In Class Warfare, Guess Which Class Is Winning - New York Times

literatelobstersareliterate:

By BEN STEIN
Published: November 26, 2006

NOT long ago, I had the pleasure of a lengthy meeting with one of the smartest men on the planet, Warren E. Buffett, the chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway, in his unpretentious offices in Omaha. We talked of many things that, I hope, will inspire me for years to come. But one of the main subjects was taxes. Mr. Buffett, who probably does not feel sick when he sees his MasterCard bill in his mailbox the way I do, is at least as exercised about the tax system as I am.

Put simply, the rich pay a lot of taxes as a total percentage of taxes collected, but they don’t pay a lot of taxes as a percentage of what they can afford to pay, or as a percentage of what the government needs to close the deficit gap.

Mr. Buffett compiled a data sheet of the men and women who work in his office. He had each of them make a fraction; the numerator was how much they paid in federal income tax and in payroll taxes for Social Security and Medicare, and the denominator was their taxable income. The people in his office were mostly secretaries and clerks, though not all.

It turned out that Mr. Buffett, with immense income from dividends and capital gains, paid far, far less as a fraction of his income than the secretaries or the clerks or anyone else in his office. Further, in conversation it came up that Mr. Buffett doesn’t use any tax planning at all. He just pays as the Internal Revenue Code requires. “How can this be fair?” he asked of how little he pays relative to his employees. “How can this be right?”

Even though I agreed with him, I warned that whenever someone tried to raise the issue, he or she was accused of fomenting class warfare.

“There’s class warfare, all right,” Mr. Buffett said, “but it’s my class, the rich class, that’s making war, and we’re winning.”

This conversation keeps coming back to mind because, in the last couple of weeks, I have been on one television panel after another, talking about how questionable it is that the country is enjoying what economists call full employment while we are still running a federal budget deficit of roughly $434 billion for fiscal 2006 (not counting off-budget items like Social Security) and economists forecast that it will grow to $567 billion in fiscal 2010.

When I mentioned on these panels that we should consider all options for closing this gap — including raising taxes, particularly for the wealthiest people — I was met with several arguments by people who call themselves conservatives and free marketers.

Read More

"There’s a feeling in the country that people are under attack. I think they’re misidentifying the source of the attack, but they feel under attack. Decades of intensive business propaganda have been designed to make them see government as the enemy, the government being the only power structure in the system that is even partially accountable to the population, so naturally you want to make that be the enemy— not the corporate system, which is totally unaccountable. After decades of propaganda, people feel that the government is some kind of enemy and they have to defend themselves from it. Many of those who advocate keeping guns have that in the back of their minds. I wouldn’t believe it if I hadn’t heard it so many times. That’s a crazy response to a real problem."

Noam Chomsky - Class Warfare: Alternative Radio Interviews Vol. 2 (via bprost)

agavebuzz:

brunch w/bob :)