claudewomen:

“Look, if you want to torture me, spank me, lick me, do it. But if this poetry sh*t continues just shoot me now please”- Lori Petty, Tank Girl

claudewomen:

“Look, if you want to torture me, spank me, lick me, do it. But if this poetry sh*t continues just shoot me now please”

- Lori Petty, Tank Girl

(Source: enelcielocondiamantes)

Men’s objectification of women is ALWAYS different than women’s objectification of men!

flowers-for-hamlet:

annuenobisdomine:

And here is why:

Almost all of the time, when a man objectifies a woman, he is physically able to force her to move from just being “admired” to actually having to be a sexual object for him. Simply put, he has the power to sexually assault her. So then, every “positive” comment, every cat call, every objectification, becomes a threat, because that man can decide to take it too far, and there is little the woman could do about it. That is why it is different. Objectification of anyone is wrong, particularly in a Christian context, but objectification of women by men is particularly problematic.

[emphasis mine]

Perhaps if we didn’t live in a rape culture, it would be different. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

(Source: thelittleorganistwhojustcanteven, via glittershotgun)

My View On Save The Boobs

thepeacockangel:

I don’t have an issue with how this campaign advertises itself.  I honestly could not fucking care even a little bit less, and  wouldn’t give a rat’s ass how they marketed themselves if they actually funded a breast cancer research, because as treatment gets better regardless of what phrase they used to get the money to fund the research that made it better, because it still means fewer dead women, and I’m pretty sure that fewer dead women is DEFINITELY a good thing.

I’m in favor of marketing breast cancer research charities and other worthwhile charities in WHATEVER way is most effective, I don’t care if it’s objectifying, or condescending or problematic or offensive, because at the end of the day if your desire to save my breasts saves my life, I don’t give a fuck about your motivations.  I really just fucking don’t.  You do whatever you have to do to get the money to save lives, and if it takes “save the boobies” to get misogynist douchebags to pay to fund research for breast cancer, so be it.

My issue with the save the boobies campaign is that it contributes no money to research,  it only “promotes awareness” (in other words, is freaking useless as fuck).  So no, I don’t care if we have to get money from misogynists to save lives… but I do object to pandering to misogynists/taking people’s money and NOT saving lives.

How revolutionary

sugah-waatah:

Jessica Valenti in her cracker glory—a white woman decide she wants to criticise a Black woman because we don’t get thrown under the bus enough. She wants to use a Black woman (Mrs Michelle Obama) as a means for her success.

Of course the fucker criticises a Black woman without putting in context Black women aren’t seen a fit to be parents but many of us we fit enough to raise white children. Black mothers are seen as delinquent and our mothering skills are only ever brought up when the world wants blame Black mothers for some ill of the world.

white feminist only giving a fuck about Black women when you want to use us for your white feminist agenda

white feminist only giving a fuck about Black women when you want to criticise us as women

white feminist only remembering some women are Black when you want to put us on stage as a critique of women

You want to tell us we’re being a woman the wrong fucking way because it gets in the way  of your manic pixie white girls delusions and white feminist ~radical~ actions 

Because we dared to use our agency to do something and live our lives differently to you

When you dismiss and deny my concerns as a woman, all you’re saying is i’m not a woman. I’m not human enough for being a woman. I’m not white like you so how can I be a woman

I’m only fit for critique and consumption. We’re things for you to use

How fucking revolutionary, the likes of trash like Jessie Valenti wants police what another woman wants to be proud of

Jaclyn Friedman using Beyonce’s then unborn child as a means for her fame

You lot are fucking shameless. 

SHAMELESS!

How revolutionary that a white woman wants to use the same tired old tools to criticise Black women. The same tired old tools constructed on the dead brown bodies of Black women and white women being enthusiastic allies in forming these same stereotypes and agents in the death and abuse of Black women. Do you really think it was only white men that built white supremacy?

Most white women have no problem abusing their status of being fragile creatures to shut WOC down. And how this is so very effective against Black women

If someone wants to be proud of being a mother, who the fuck are you to police our that? You want to criticise a Black mother for being proud of mothering in a world that deems us unfit to be a mothers. How very revolutionary of you. Look at you empowering all women, white feminist. Look at you keeping the dialogue around women squarely on the stories of middle class white women that will probably hire brown nannies

Shaming those that want to be and that are proud of being a mothers because it doesn’t into what YOU see as revolutionary…

Continue making period art and making knitting gangs or what ever the fuck is trendy for white feminist. 

(via womanistgamergirl)

Not Pandering to The Female Gaze Doesn’t Make Economic Sense

thepeacockangel:

You know what people like?  Sexy people.  You know what gets people to spend money? Sexy people.

You know what’s proof the patriarchy doesn’t give a shit about economics?  How rarely the female gaze is pandered to.

Whenever something panders to the female gaze, it becomes a MASSIVE hit.  Supernatural, The Avengers, Twilight, Pirates of The Caribbean, regardless of what you think of these pieces of media, they feature attractive scantily clad men, and they all made LOADS of money.

There’s nothing wrong with scantily clad women doing suggestive things, provided they’re depicted as sexy people, not sexy objects (more on that later) the problem is this weird inexplicable imbalance.  It’s as if there’s this unspoken rule that we must never or only rarely use sexy male bodies to sell a product, to promote a movie, and that’s a shame, for everyone.  A great number of people love being sexualized at least a little bit, but men have been trained to believe wanting to be attractive is wrong or unmanly, and women have been trained to believe they’re not allowed to be attracted to physical attractiveness.

I mean, we live in a culture where Michael Cera is cast as a romantic lead.  Fuck that, are men really so afraid of women masturbating to hotties that they WILLINGLY throw away bundles of cash?  Sexy people are great, having your gaze pandered to is great, and pandering to horny ladies (and yes, ladies can be just as horn-doggy as men) is AWESOME (and economically sensible).

So Hollywood, and media industry in general, you want to make money?  Shirtless men, full frontal male nudity that isn’t treated as hilarious or disgusting, and all the good looking men you can throw in there, because you’re not pandering to the gaze of like half your audience (straight women, and gay men).

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

“Genuine equality between the sexes can only be realized in the process of the socialist transformation of society as a whole.” - Mao Zedong, Introductory note to “Women Have Gone to the Labour Front”, 1955, The Socialist Upsurge in China’s Countryside, Chinese ed., Vol. I.
 

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

“Genuine equality between the sexes can only be realized in the process of the socialist transformation of society as a whole.” - Mao Zedong, Introductory note to “Women Have Gone to the Labour Front”, 1955, The Socialist Upsurge in China’s Countryside, Chinese ed., Vol. I.
 

womenaresociety:

Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls!
Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls (RnRC4G) is a nonprofit that empowers young girls and women through music. Originally founded in 2000 by Misty McElroy as part of a women’s studies project at Portland State University, there are now 30 affiliate camps all over the world from Oakland, CA to London. It’s no surprise that the idea has taken center stage in so many places; I volunteered there this summer and can attest to its overall awesomeness.
I interviewed sts—drummer, zinester, filmmaker, and the nonprofit’s current Program Director—to learn how RnRC4G has grown and amplified its impact.
Tell us about how the idea for Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls was conceived.
Inspired by Ladyfest and the Riot Grrl movement, RnRC4G was founded to address a lack of feminist resources for girls, especially in creating and performing music, and playing instruments such as the drums, electric guitar, and turntables. We have also always provided self-defense classes to every camper.
Why do you think the idea caught on in so many places?
This mission of the RnRC4G is so inspiring! So many women, feminists, and musicians deeply connect with our mission and core values, and they want to see it happen in their own communities, which is incredible. Rock Camp is a great place to explore teamwork, conflict-resolution, creative experimentation, and performance in a supportive environment surrounded by amazing female mentors. It’s fun, exciting, and very positive. I think the magic is in the mission: to put self-esteem and life skills development first, and use music creation and instruction as a tool to help our campers practice being leaders, resolving conflict, working as a team, and putting aside relational-aggressive behaviors in favor of supporting one another. This is a great environment for almost everyone, including the instructors, coaches, and counselors.
How exactly did the other camps come into existence?
It totally varies from camp to camp, but it seems that in the beginning, touring musicians, summer camp volunteers, and other women involved with our programs were so excited about their experiences here that they decided to bring the mission to life in their own cities through opening up their own camps. Most organizers are volunteers who have day jobs. They start the way we started — by gathering support from local feminists, musicians, businesses and other community supporters; borrowing gear; getting donations; and getting campers and volunteers to come together for a week of summer camp.
The Girls Rock Camp Alliance (GRCA) now has about 30 affiliate camps, continually inspiring new camps all over the world. We are not a franchise. GRCA is in place to help network like-minded camps and offer a means of skill sharing, networking, and institutionalizing our programs and mission.
If I wanted to open up a Rock Camp in my town, what would the general step-by-step process look like?
Go to GRCA and see if your idea matches with our mission, statement of purpose and core values. If it does, the next step is to apply to become a pending affiliate organization, and try to attend the annual conference in March each year. Its only $20 to join, and there’s financial assistance to get at least one organizer to attend. We offer workshops on how to start a summer camp, become a nonprofit, organize and train volunteers, fundraise, as well as work with donors, parents, and your community.
Or, get a space, put on a benefit show, and spread the word that you’re starting a Rock Camp and see what happens!
What advice would you give to others looking to replicate this idea?
I tell people that the first things they need is a powerful mission statement and a website. Self-esteem in girls looks different to many people, and in different cultures. Try to get as much community support and input as possible and find out what the needs are in your community. In Rock Camp world, making music in a fun and supportive environment can mean something different for everyone.
*Interview from idealist.org. Official camp website here.

womenaresociety:

Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls!

Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls (RnRC4G) is a nonprofit that empowers young girls and women through music. Originally founded in 2000 by Misty McElroy as part of a women’s studies project at Portland State University, there are now 30 affiliate camps all over the world from Oakland, CA to London. It’s no surprise that the idea has taken center stage in so many places; I volunteered there this summer and can attest to its overall awesomeness.

I interviewed sts—drummer, zinester, filmmaker, and the nonprofit’s current Program Director—to learn how RnRC4G has grown and amplified its impact.

Tell us about how the idea for Rock ‘n’ Roll Camp for Girls was conceived.

Inspired by Ladyfest and the Riot Grrl movement, RnRC4G was founded to address a lack of feminist resources for girls, especially in creating and performing music, and playing instruments such as the drums, electric guitar, and turntables. We have also always provided self-defense classes to every camper.

Why do you think the idea caught on in so many places?

This mission of the RnRC4G is so inspiring! So many women, feminists, and musicians deeply connect with our mission and core values, and they want to see it happen in their own communities, which is incredible. Rock Camp is a great place to explore teamwork, conflict-resolution, creative experimentation, and performance in a supportive environment surrounded by amazing female mentors. It’s fun, exciting, and very positive. I think the magic is in the mission: to put self-esteem and life skills development first, and use music creation and instruction as a tool to help our campers practice being leaders, resolving conflict, working as a team, and putting aside relational-aggressive behaviors in favor of supporting one another. This is a great environment for almost everyone, including the instructors, coaches, and counselors.

How exactly did the other camps come into existence?

It totally varies from camp to camp, but it seems that in the beginning, touring musicians, summer camp volunteers, and other women involved with our programs were so excited about their experiences here that they decided to bring the mission to life in their own cities through opening up their own camps. Most organizers are volunteers who have day jobs. They start the way we started — by gathering support from local feminists, musicians, businesses and other community supporters; borrowing gear; getting donations; and getting campers and volunteers to come together for a week of summer camp.

The Girls Rock Camp Alliance (GRCA) now has about 30 affiliate camps, continually inspiring new camps all over the world. We are not a franchise. GRCA is in place to help network like-minded camps and offer a means of skill sharing, networking, and institutionalizing our programs and mission.

If I wanted to open up a Rock Camp in my town, what would the general step-by-step process look like?

Go to GRCA and see if your idea matches with our mission, statement of purpose and core values. If it does, the next step is to apply to become a pending affiliate organization, and try to attend the annual conference in March each year. Its only $20 to join, and there’s financial assistance to get at least one organizer to attend. We offer workshops on how to start a summer camp, become a nonprofit, organize and train volunteers, fundraise, as well as work with donors, parents, and your community.

Or, get a space, put on a benefit show, and spread the word that you’re starting a Rock Camp and see what happens!

What advice would you give to others looking to replicate this idea?

I tell people that the first things they need is a powerful mission statement and a website. Self-esteem in girls looks different to many people, and in different cultures. Try to get as much community support and input as possible and find out what the needs are in your community. In Rock Camp world, making music in a fun and supportive environment can mean something different for everyone.

*Interview from idealist.org. Official camp website here.

brittanyblossom:

A Useful Rape Analogy

brittanyblossom:

A Useful Rape Analogy

(Source: lifeblossoms, via porcelain-horse-horselain)

sketchamagowza:

WOOP WOOP! WARNING, POLITICAL COMMENTARY! WOOP WOOP! 
Based on the fact that the contraceptive hearing did not include a single woman.

sketchamagowza:

WOOP WOOP! WARNING, POLITICAL COMMENTARY! WOOP WOOP! 

Based on the fact that the contraceptive hearing did not include a single woman.

(Source: sketchamagowza, via outspokenviews-deactivated20120)

powerpussysays:

[Joss Whedon stands in a black, leather jacket, grey t-shirt, and jeans. TOP TEXT: “Why do you write strong female characters?” BOTTOM TEXT: “Because you’re still asking me that question.” Joseph “Joss” Whedon]

powerpussysays:

[Joss Whedon stands in a black, leather jacket, grey t-shirt, and jeans. TOP TEXT: “Why do you write strong female characters?” BOTTOM TEXT: “Because you’re still asking me that question.” Joseph “Joss” Whedon]

The Kids Don't Stand A Chance: Anonymous asked: Can you make me a sandwich? (I’m only asking because you’re a feminist bitch)

thesavagesalad:

thesavagesalad:

STORY TIME

This one time I was 19 and was sort of dating this guy who was really nice at the beginning but slowly started to incorporate these sandwich jokes. It was quite possible that he was incapable of making his own delicious snacks. Anyway, back to the story.

So his sandwich jokes got to the point of featuring in day to day conversation and every time I’d ask him to stop, he’d be quite defensive about his freedom of speech. On the day that we broke up, he did the whole make me a sandwich spiel again, so I got up and made this sandwich right? But while I was making it, I was talking about how we were going to have the most dirtiest, most nastiest sex imaginable, after he got his sandwich. By the time the sandwich was done, I was telling him that if he wanted it (the sex and sandwuch) badly, he’d have to take off his pants (just the boxers on with an obvious boner and a wet patch) and follow me.

So he follows me yeah? He doesn’t notice that I have my bag ready and all, and I step out his house yeah? Here’s little ole’ me waving around this sandwich in front of pantsless McGee as he follows me to the bus stop (still dirty talking pathetically, him with his boner saying hi) and when the bus arrives, I hop on (with the sandwich) and leave my sad little ex with his dick hanging out for the general public to see.

Moral of the story: Don’t tell sandwich jokes and don’t mess with feminists because things like this will happen to you.

image

reblogging because everyone needs story time

image


image

(via hinduthug)

subconciousevolution:

http://www.occupypatriarchy.org/

subconciousevolution:

http://www.occupypatriarchy.org/

(via porcelain-horse-horselain)

"Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him."

Sojourner Truth (via wearethedescendantsofstars)

(Source: daughterofzami, via discosunfish)

thinkmexican:

La Adelita
“Women during that time struggled to fight for a better future for themselves and the generations to come. They fought bravely and selflessly and made their marks in the world.” - Tereza Jandura, Revolutionary Mexican Women 
Read more at the University of Arizona

thinkmexican:

La Adelita

“Women during that time struggled to fight for a better future for themselves and the generations to come. They fought bravely and selflessly and made their marks in the world.” - Tereza Jandura, Revolutionary Mexican Women 

Read more at the University of Arizona

(Source: thinkmexican, via maghrabiyya)