wocinsolidarity:

sourcedumal:

Remember, y’all:

More POC in the storyline = PC bullshit

But POC erasure = “best actor for the role”

-_- yup

(via aliveforalittlewhile)

"LYDEN: You commissioned a dozen studies on women in media from the Annenberg School at USC. Some of the figures just really boggled the imagination when you think that women are half of all moviegoers. If we didn’t go to the movies, maybe this would make more sense. But we turn out in droves.

DAVIS: I know. It really does boggle the mind. In family films and kids television shows, for every one female character, there are three male characters. But lest people think that it’s all bad news, we were able to see an increase in the percentage of female characters in family films, such that if we add female characters at the rate we have been for the past 20 years, we will achieve parody in 700 years.

(LAUGHTER)

DAVIS: And my institute, we have dedicated ourselves to cutting that in half. And we will not rest until it’s only 350 years.

LYDEN: Why is this the case?

DAVIS: My theory is that since all anybody has seen when they are growing up is this big imbalance that the movies that they’ve watched are about, let’s say, five-to-one as far as female presence is concerned. That’s what starts to look normal. And let’s think about in difference segments of society - 17 percent of cardiac surgeons are women, 17 percent of tenured professors are women. It just goes on and on. And isn’t that strange that that’s also the percentage of women in crowd scenes in movies? What if we’re actually training people to see that ratio as normal so that when you’re an adult, you don’t notice?

LYDEN: I wonder what the impact is of all of this lack of female representation.

DAVIS: We just heard a fascinating and disturbing study where they looked at the ratio of men and women in groups. And they found that if there’s 17 percent women, the men in the group think it’s 50-50. And if there’s 33 percent women, the men perceive that as there being more women in the room than men.

LYDEN: Oh, my goodness.

DAVIS: So is it possible that 17 percent women has become so comfortable and so normal that that’s just sort of unconsciously expected?

LYDEN: Why else, Geena Davis, do these kinds of disparities matter?

DAVIS: What we’re in effect doing is training children to see that women and girls are less important than men and boys. We’re training them to perceive that women take up only 17 percent of the space in the world. And if you add on top of that that so many female characters are sexualized, even in things that are aimed at little kids, that’s having an enormous impact as well."

NPR, “Casting Call: Hollywood Needs More Women” [x] (via mswyrr)

(via aliveforalittlewhile)

theadultswimpage:

computerheroboy:

Adult Swim making an unholy amount of sense.

Great message.

            - [adult swim] fan

(Source: atomheart-brother, via syntheticaudios-deactivated2013)

mehreenkasana:

Pakistani film Sohna Daaku in Punjabi.

mehreenkasana:

Pakistani film Sohna Daaku in Punjabi.

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)


Mamiya RB67 Pro-SD. Kodak Portra 400.

Mamiya RB67 Pro-SD. Kodak Portra 400.

(via fyeahcameras)

cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor Richard Roundtree
‘Richard Roundtree was a leading man in early 1970s blacksploitation films, his best-known role being Detective John Shaft in the hugely popular action movie Shaft.’
(photo: Richard Roundtree)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History We Honor Richard Roundtree

Richard Roundtree was a leading man in early 1970s blacksploitation films, his best-known role being Detective John Shaft in the hugely popular action movie Shaft.’

(photo: Richard Roundtree)

- CARTER Magazine

(via fyeahcracker)

zuky:

infinitetext:

Zhang Yimou, Red Sorghum, 1987.

I watched 红高粱 Red Sorghum last night for like the 15th time since my parents took me to see its modest opening in a L.A. Chinatown theater in 1987. It was Zhang Yimou’s first film and still probably my favorite of all his dazzling works, based on the novel by this year’s winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Mo Yan. It was also Gong Li’s screen debut, in a mesmerizing, utterly convincing performance as a radiant strong-willed peasant girl who is sold into marriage with an old leper and winds up taking over his sorghum distillery, in the midst of the brutal, bloody Japanese invasion of China. The story bounces with ease between folkloric drama, comedy, adventure, and of course tragedy, as Chinese stories often do, in the manner of Beijing opera. Zhang Yimou went on to produce a slew of stylized big-budget masterpieces, but in my opinion it doesn’t get any better than his small-budget debut.

zuky:

infinitetext:

Zhang Yimou, Red Sorghum, 1987.

I watched 红高粱 Red Sorghum last night for like the 15th time since my parents took me to see its modest opening in a L.A. Chinatown theater in 1987. It was Zhang Yimou’s first film and still probably my favorite of all his dazzling works, based on the novel by this year’s winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature Mo Yan. It was also Gong Li’s screen debut, in a mesmerizing, utterly convincing performance as a radiant strong-willed peasant girl who is sold into marriage with an old leper and winds up taking over his sorghum distillery, in the midst of the brutal, bloody Japanese invasion of China. The story bounces with ease between folkloric drama, comedy, adventure, and of course tragedy, as Chinese stories often do, in the manner of Beijing opera. Zhang Yimou went on to produce a slew of stylized big-budget masterpieces, but in my opinion it doesn’t get any better than his small-budget debut.

(Source: infinitetext, via stopwhitewashing)

selectedillustrations:

80s heroes by Guillaume Singelin

(via catbountry)

mehreenkasana:

Le fond de l’air est rouge (1977) by Chris Marker.

(Source: some-velvet-morning, via cassavetesclique-deactivated877)

skottieyoung:

I saw Wreck It Ralph this weekend and LOVED it. It was so much fun. So, he and Vanillope get a daily sketch. 

skottieyoung:

I saw Wreck It Ralph this weekend and LOVED it. It was so much fun. So, he and Vanillope get a daily sketch. 

(Source: skottieyoung, via catbountry)

ladydayblues:

antipahtico:

Yoidore Tenshi ~ Akira Kurosawa ~ Toshiro Mifune

Drunken Angel

One of the most beautiful men to have walked this earth.

(Source: maudit, via cassavetesclique-deactivated877)

"Red Dawn" remake is a racist clusterfuck of nope

downlo:

Looks like it is indeed yet another yellow peril movie that depicts Asians as interchangeable agents of menace who must be defeated by heroic, real AKA white Americans. As this review points out, this fuels anti-Asian racism:

We had heard a rumor from a source who had worked on the film remake that the production had difficulty finding extras to depict the Chinese invaders, to the point where people working on the production got so desperate for Asian faces that they asked their Asian American friends who did not work in the movie industry if they were interested in being in the movie. That’s understandable, since there’s more than a whiff of “yellow peril” and “perpetual foreigner” in the film, reinforcing some of the negative stereotypes that affect Asian Americans today. For example, a 2009 survey of the “general population” of the United States found that 45% of Americans believe Asian Americans are more loyal to their countries of ancestry than to the U.S., up from 37% in the 2001 survey and 20% believe Asian Americans do not care what happens to anyone but their own kind. This is worrisome because at least 28% of the general population of the United States reports rarely or never interacting with Asian Americans–so there are no real life interactions to counter the stereotypes presented Red Dawn (2012).

The movie doesn’t stop at cliched, racist depictions of Asians, though. There are also plenty of expendable brown characters so that our white heroes can Learn and Grow:

The white characters and characters of color are put in equally dangerous situations. It’s just that the story bullets just happen to hit brown kids, and the character development lines just happen to go to the white kids. (Cue white kids sad about dead brown kids–builds character!–and then quickly getting over it. In contrast, the death of the one white character is designed to propel character development of other white characters, and move the audience in a way that the death of the cannon fodder characters of color do not.)

[…]

So, uh, the Red Dawn remake in a nutshell: If you are brown, and North Korea ever invades, and your white friends decide to launch a guerrilla resistance movement, DO NOT JOIN THEM. The will get you killed. Because the Red Dawn remake really manages to off every single brown kid in the movie.

I hope this movie does badly. It sounds not only racist as hell, but lazy and hacky.

(via reverseracism)

Yellow Face and Orientalism in the Media: Controlling What it Means to be Asian

bankuei:

hannahology:

[Inspired by my Amplify associate, Karachi, and her post on Blackface, Slurs and Appropriation]

Yellow Face isn’t just the mere inauthenticity and a failure of aesthetics of white people dressing up, wearing make up, trying to be Asian, and/or playing the roles of Asians.  No, it’s definitely more insidious and problematic than that.  It is systematic racism and discrimination, refusing to hire Asians or forcing them to play as villains, or when they receive a major role, it is typically a stereotypical one (i.e., martial arts, ‘wise man’, ‘dragon lady’, etc).  It simulates a crude idea of what ‘Asians’ look like, all the while perpetuating terrible stereotypes, controlling what it means to be Asian whether it’s in person, on the stage, or on screen.  

Orientalism: It’s a dichotomy created by the ‘West,’ it builds a view of the ‘East’ along with many elements of this culture that becomes obscured and exotic. Making a whole group of people seen as something monolithic, creating an erasure of actual identities.  

I’m not even going to try to bother with getting too in-depth about the obvious cultural appropriation, ethnocentrism, and orientalism (not too much at least).  I’m not going to go into Yellow Face on stage, in whitewashing (too much), in Europe, nor will I take the time to go through political caricatures of Asians throughout history.  [Not that it’s less important or there’s a lack of evidence.]  These following examples and history checks should do enough for now in getting my point across.  (Please find a friend in Google if you really want to educate yourself though!  Thank you!)

So, why did Yellowface occur?  Was there a shortage of Asian people to play these Asian roles during the times this practice was most rampant (19th and 20th century)?

Meet Sessue Hayakawa (Born 1889-Death 1973), the first Asian American leading actor.  He was one of the highest paid actors of his time.  His talents were definitely recognized by Paramount Pictures and was even considered a sex icon.  But despite all of this, he still met discrimination and racism everywhere he went.  He was always forced to either play “the exotic villain” or “the exotic lover.”  He waited for his turn to be casted as a hero of color, but it never came.

This is Anna May Wong (1905-1961).  During the 1920s-1930s, Anna was given many different roles as a contracted Paramount Pictures actress, but they were always either as a “dragon lady” or a “butterfly lady.”  Despite all of that, she was still a household name and was considered a fashion icon.

She was the top contender for the leading role of O-Lan, a Chinese heroine for the movie The Good Earth (1937) by MGM, but that role was later given to Luise Rainer (definitely not Asian).  MGM went to her and tried to give her another role for a film called Lotus, but it meant that she had to be the villain again, so she turned it down and left for Europe for more opportunities and eventually went back to Paramount Pictures.


Say hello to Philip Ahn (1905-1973).  For the film, Anything Goes, Ahn was initially rejected by the director, Lewis Milestone, because—I shit you not, he said this to Philip Ahn—he thought Philip’s “English was too good for the part.”  During World War II, Philip Ahn was often forced to play roles of Japanese villains.  He even received death threats because people thought he was actually Japanese.

Other Asian actors/actresses: Barbara Jean Wong, Fely Franquelli, Benson Fong, Chester Gan, Honorable Wu, Kam Tong, Keye Luke, Layne Tom Jr., Maurice Liu, Philip Ahn, Richard Loo, Lotus Long, Rudy Robles, Suzanna Kim, Teru Shimada, Willie Fung, Victor Sen Yung, Toshia Mori and Wing Foo.  

Merle Oberon can also be added to the list, although she was part white/part Asian.  She had to lie about her origins and applied whitening make up to pass as fully white.  Other Asian actors and actresses: Jack Soo, Pat Morita, Mako, Bruce Lee, Lucy Liu, Margaret Cho, B.D. Wong, Amy Hill, Jennie Kwan, Masi Oka, James Lee, Ming Na, Daniel Dae Kim, Sendhil Ramamurthy, Charlyne Yi, Miyoshi Umeki, Shin Koyamada, John Cho, Brenda Song, and George Takei.  Click on this link to see a hundred more.  

After going through the list, ask yourself why the majority of the actors and actresses here are either in some martial arts movies or some other stereotypical crap? 

TL;DR this section: There definitely wasn’t a shortage of Asian American actors and actresses.  And there still isn’t.


Very Few Examples (of Very Many) of Yellowface in History:
 

Nil Ashter as General Yen from The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933)

What Nils Ashter really looked like:

Harold Huber as Ito Takimura in Little Tokyo, USA (1942)
Interestingly enough, everyone who was a “bad guy” in this was portrayed as Japanese.  Even more interesting, this was around the same time Japanese Internment Camps were happening.

What Harold Huber really looked like:

Katharine Hepburn as Jade Tan in in Dragon Seed (1944)

Katharine Hepburn just a few years after Dragon Seed:

Jennifer Jones as Dr. Han Suyin in Love is a Many Splendored-Thing (1955)

Another interesting concept found in this movie. “BEING WITH ASIAN WOMEN IS SO HOT AND EXOTIC. LET’S FETISHIZE THE SHIT OUT OF THEM.” Yup.

What Jennifer Jones actually looks like:

John Wayne as Genghis Khan in The Conqueror (1956)

John Wayne, y’all:

Mickey Rooney as Mr. Yunioshi in Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

Mickey Rooney at that time:

Joel Grey as Chiun (Kung Fu Master, everyone—on the left) in Remo Williams (1985)

What Joel Grey really looked like:


Other cases I haven’t really taken the time to cover: Charlie Chan Series
(Actors who played as Charlie Chan from 1931-1981: Warner Oland, Sidney Toler, Roland Winters, Peter Ustinov) Fu Manchu, Madame Butterfly, The Teahouse of the August Moon, Shanghai Express, The Manchurian Candidate, Sayonara, Mr. Moto Series, 7 Faces of Dr. Lao, Short Circuit (1986 & 1988), The Party, Gunga Din, Broken Blossoms, The Year of Living Dangerously, etc.


I mean, I guess you could say, “But those movies were decades ago!”
 

Alex Borstein as Ms. Swan. 

Nicholas Cage as Fu Manchu (2007)
(Other actors who played the role of Fu Manchu starting from the 1920s up ‘til now: H. Agar Lyons, Warner Oland, Boris Karloff, Harry Brannon, Christopher Lee, and Peter Sellers)

Christopher Walken as Feng (2007)

Rob Schneider as Asian Minister in I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2007)

M. Night’s The Last Airbender (2010)
Well, the show was based on Asian and Inuit culture.  But just look at the casting.  The three protagonists are all light skinned while Zuko (played by Dev Patel in the movie) is dark skinned, and by default in this movie, the bad guy.  Someone please just remake this movie.  Please. 

British Actor, Jim Sturgess, (rocking bad eye prosthetics) playing as a Korean in Cloud Atlas (2012)

Like I said - I continue to refuse to support media businesses which overtly show you they’re totally about segregation era- hiring practices - because how much more obvious can it get than…

“We wanted an asian character, but we hired a white person, and even though we say it’s about acting chops MORE THAN APPEARANCE, we decided to dress them up to LOOK ASIAN, so in reality what we’re saying is we wanted someone who ‘looked asian’ but we were too damn racist to consider giving that money to an actual asian so instead we spent lots of money on make up and CGI to instead, so that tells you how much money we’re willing to drop to make sure we don’t accidentally give any Asian actors a paycheck.”

(via green-street-politics)

taiwanesefood:

000078250011 by maycehsu on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

000078250011 by maycehsu on Flickr.

puzzlegirlsandpoprocks:

Favorite Movies: Children of Men (2006, Alfonso Cuaron). 

I love this movie sooooooo much. 

(Source: anthonymackies, via captaindoubled)