"Chief Joyi railed against the white man, who he believed had deliberately sundered the Xhosa tribe, dividing brother from brother. The white man had told the Thembus that their true chief was the great white queen across the ocean and that they were her subjects. But the white queen brought nothing but misery and perfidy to the black people, and if she was a chief she was an evil chief. Chief Joyi’s war stories and his indictment of the British made me feel angry and cheated, as though I had already been robbed of my own birthright.
Chief Joyi said that the African people lived in relative peace until the coming of the abelungu, the white people, who arrived from across the sea with fire-breathing weapons. Once, he said, the Thembu, the Mpondo, the Xhosa, and the Zulu were all children of one father, and lived as brothers. The white man shattered the abantu, the fellowship, of the various tribes. The white man was hungry and greedy for land, and the black man shared the land with him as they shared the air and water; land was not for man to possess. But the white man took the land as you might seize another man’s horse.
I did not yet know that the real history of our country was not to be found in standard British textbooks, which claimed South Africa began with the landing of Jan Van Riebeeck at the Cape of Good Hope in 1652. It was from Chief Joyi that I began to discover that the history of the Bantu-speaking peoples began far to the north, in a country of lakes and green plains and valleys, and that slowly over the millennia we made our way down to the very tip of this great continent."

Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela

… sounds super familiar.

(via adailyriot)

(via karnythia)

selchieproductions:

[image description: Paul Raffaele said a Suruwaha girl refused to shake his hand because she wanted to kill him. In fact, he was wearing so much sun cream the Suruwaha thought he had a skin disease.]
© Survival International
Australia’s Channel 7 network has been found guilty by the press regulator of serious violations of the broadcasting code, after screening a report so extreme it was branded ‘Freakshow TV’ by Survival International.
The report labelled Brazil’s Suruwaha tribe as child murderers; ‘Stone Age’ relics; and ‘one of the worst human rights violators in the world’.
Survival complained to Australia’s regulator ACMA after Channel 7 refused Survival’s request to issue a correction to its report, broadcast on its Sunday Night programme.
In a landmark judgment, ACMA has now ruled that the Channel was guilty of breaking its racism clause – ‘provoking intense dislike, serious contempt or severe ridicule against a person or group’ – believed to be the first time it has found a broadcaster guilty of this serious offence under the 2010 TV Code. It has also ruled that the Channel was guilty of broadcasting inaccurate material.
Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This was one of the worst reports about contemporary tribal people we’d ever seen. The Indians were made out to be cruel and inhuman monsters, in the spirit of 19th century colonialist scorn for ‘primitive savages’.
‘What makes it even worse is that the Suruwaha have been under attack by fundamentalist missionaries for years, who are waging a campaign slandering them as child-murderers. The missionaries are behind a draft law to allow them to remove Indian children from their communities, something with horrifying echoes of the Stolen Generations scandal.
‘The Channel 7 crew told the Suruwaha they wanted to allow them to put their side of the story – but actually produced one of the most grotesquely distorted pictures of a tribal people we can remember. The programme even openly fundraised for the missionaries on its website. We hope this ruling will mean we’re less likely to see such dangerous rubbish on TV in the future.’
Channel 7 is seeking a judicial review of the ruling in Australia’s Federal Court.
Note to Editors:
Survival has written a set of ethical guidelines to help filmmakers work responsibly with tribal peoples. It is also using its Stamp it Out campaign to challenge racist depictions, however unwitting, in the media.
Previously, Survival has highlighted how British TV company Cicada Films was accused of irresponsibly endangering the lives of Peruvian Indians by allegedly provoking a flu epidemic amongst them; and how a TV series about an Amazonian tribe was labelled ‘staged, false, fabricated and distorted’ by experts.
Download a Survival briefing sheet on the proposed ‘Muwaji’s law’, the result of a campaign in Brazil by the fundamentalist missionary organization JOCUM (pdf, 70 KB). JOCUM are the Brazilian branch of the US organization Youth with a Mission.
Download a briefing sheet on what experts and Indians say about JOCUM’s infanticide allegations (pdf, 49 KB).
Download statements from Suruwaha Indians about the Channel 7 report (pdf, 33 KB).

selchieproductions:

[image description: Paul Raffaele said a Suruwaha girl refused to shake his hand because she wanted to kill him. In fact, he was wearing so much sun cream the Suruwaha thought he had a skin disease.]

© Survival International

Australia’s Channel 7 network has been found guilty by the press regulator of serious violations of the broadcasting code, after screening a report so extreme it was branded ‘Freakshow TV’ by Survival International.

The report labelled Brazil’s Suruwaha tribe as child murderers; ‘Stone Age’ relics; and ‘one of the worst human rights violators in the world’.

Survival complained to Australia’s regulator ACMA after Channel 7 refused Survival’s request to issue a correction to its report, broadcast on its Sunday Night programme.

In a landmark judgment, ACMA has now ruled that the Channel was guilty of breaking its racism clause – ‘provoking intense dislike, serious contempt or severe ridicule against a person or group’ – believed to be the first time it has found a broadcaster guilty of this serious offence under the 2010 TV Code. It has also ruled that the Channel was guilty of broadcasting inaccurate material.

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This was one of the worst reports about contemporary tribal people we’d ever seen. The Indians were made out to be cruel and inhuman monsters, in the spirit of 19th century colonialist scorn for ‘primitive savages’.

‘What makes it even worse is that the Suruwaha have been under attack by fundamentalist missionaries for years, who are waging a campaign slandering them as child-murderers. The missionaries are behind a draft law to allow them to remove Indian children from their communities, something with horrifying echoes of the Stolen Generations scandal.

‘The Channel 7 crew told the Suruwaha they wanted to allow them to put their side of the story – but actually produced one of the most grotesquely distorted pictures of a tribal people we can remember. The programme even openly fundraised for the missionaries on its website. We hope this ruling will mean we’re less likely to see such dangerous rubbish on TV in the future.’

Channel 7 is seeking a judicial review of the ruling in Australia’s Federal Court.

Note to Editors:

  • Survival has written a set of ethical guidelines to help filmmakers work responsibly with tribal peoples. It is also using its Stamp it Out campaign to challenge racist depictions, however unwitting, in the media.

apihtawikosisan:

hurray-caucasoids:

apihtawikosisan:

hurray-caucasoids:

If you consider racism to be more ‘important’ than the staggering rape statistics in America I will deem you a hopeless, worthless cause.

Because of course, race and sexual assault have nothing to do with one another.  They are hermetically sealed off from one another.

Okay you want to play this game I will bring up how in regards to interracial rape, black men overwhelmingly rape white women. Go ahead and try to explain away reality, you won’t be able to, but honestly I care about all women, who are 49% of the world population. Racism exists outside of America, and any race can hate another.

Go ahead and try to dismiss me or call me a silly white girl, hope you understand how little I care about being called racist, which is your only attack apparently.

“This game” I think pretty much sums up your inability to understand that race and gender intersect. 

Of course a “silly white girl” doesn’t care about being called racist.  Silly white girls do not actually experience systemic racism, and thus it is very easy to dismiss race and pretend that the experiences of white women are the experiences of all women.

It is clear you did not read the link I provided to you, which refers to the number of aboriginal women in Canada who have been raped and murdered because they are aboriginal.  That link also explains how systemic racism has made aboriginal women more vulnerable to such abuse, particularly via endemic, systemic racism within law enforcement agencies who disproportionately focus on white victims while deliberately not investigating the murders and disappearances of native victims.

In fact, this issue is so outrageous that they’ve actually had to launch an inquiry into how badly the police botched investigations related to the mostly native victims.  What is even more sickening is that the inquiry itself has been marred by racism, refusing to give full hearing to officers who worked on these cases who testified to the way in which investigators refused to do their jobs because the women who were missing were nativeThe sexism involved in these issues is very much informed by race.

You may be unaware of these things, and thus making a statement that “violence against women is more important than race” makes sense to you.  But it makes little sense to those of us who experience sexual violence BECAUSE OF OUR RACE.

Nor does your approach in any way show an awareness of how white feminism  ignores the racist impact of colonialism on gender roles in native societies.  You might want to learn more.

Do not pretend to ‘care about all women’ while dismissing how race very much has something to do with the kind of sexualised violence we face as women who are not white.

And yes, I will call you a racist and a white supremacist, as your blog so clearly marks you to be.  Whether you ‘care’ about this or not makes no difference.

(via green-street-politics)

"A colonized mind is capable of seeing ONLY the options laid out by the coloniser […] a colonised mind is trained to be held within the limits set by the coloniser […] solutions have to come from decolonized minds that can see beyond the confines established and enforced by the coloniser […] often colonised minds will side with the coloniser against decolonized thinking and action, that is what the colonized are trained to do, that is part of the colonisation process"

Debra White Plume dropping some truth bombs (via selchieproductions)

Much like the Sámedikkit.

(via dolgematki)

(via crankyduojar-deactivated2012073)

"As the first born warriors of the Grand Canyon we refuse to become the next millennium’s world terrorists by allowing mega nuclear industrial complex mining industries to mine in the Grand Canyon."

Damon Watahomigie, Supai, delivering a powerful testimony on the destruction of his people’s homelands by uranium mining, coal fired power plants and oil and gas drilling, during a session with the UN Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Mr James Anaya. (via selchieproductions)

selchieproductions:

Latin American indigenous groups join forces to fight dams© BBC Brasil
When Brazilian indigenous leader Tashka Yawanawa saw the news on television that communities from Peru were campaigning to prevent the construction of dams close to their land, he had no doubt about how he could help.
He turned on his computer, and using Skype, he contacted indigenous movements involved in the protest to offer both his support and to publicise the cause in Brazil.
“Today, indigenous groups can no longer escape the white man’s technology,” says Mr Yawanawa.
“We have to update ourselves, and prepare to face this new world.”
He belongs to the Yawanawa people, who live in the Brazilian Amazon, an area where indigenous communities have also fought many battles against hydroelectric dams.
He leads an organisation that seeks to build links with similar movements in other Latin American countries so they can learn from each other’s campaigns.
His initiative reflects an unprecedented effort among the region’s indigenous groups, as they join forces to resist major projects which they see as damaging to their territories.
It is part of a growing conflict as governments, seeking what they say is badly needed economic growth, build roads and hydro-electric dams, and exploit natural resources such as oil, copper and gold.
At the same time, indigenous groups say they are fighting to ensure that their traditional way of life is preserved.
Skype is one tool they are using to co-ordinate campaigns, alongside more traditional tactics such as adopting a unified position in international organisations including the UN and the Organisation of American States (OAS).
“We are mapping all the achievements of our fellow indigenous peoples in the continent in order to use their experiences here in Brazil,” says Marcos Apurina from the Co-ordination of Indigenous Organisations of the Brazilian Amazon (Coiab).
“Our problems are almost identical to the native peoples of other countries.”
‘Green economy’
This approach has been led by large national indigenous organisations and regional movements such as the Co-ordination of Indigenous Organisations of the Amazon Basin (Coica).
Coica operates across national boundaries, helping groups in Ecuador, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Guyana, French Guiana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela.
Coica’s work also involves organising meetings and workshops to help indigenous communities learn about international conventions, and also tips on lobbying and dealing with people in positions of power.
These gatherings allow indigenous leaders to discuss ways of putting pressure on governments to demarcate their territories.
They also discuss how international bodies can help guarantee indigenous rights or prevent major economic projects from having a detrimental impact.
“We are concerned about the new form of development known as the ‘green economy’. We understand this as an effort to exploit natural resources in indigenous territories,” says Rodrigo de la Cruz from Coica.
Several projects in the Brazil-Peru border region aim to expand the economic and transport integration between the two countries in the coming years.
The Inter-Oceanic Highway, connecting the north-west of Brazil to Peruvian ports on the Pacific coast, was inaugurated in 2011.
According to indigenous movements, this has brought several problems to the region, such as deforestation and illegal mining.
Jaime Corisepa, president of the Native Federation of Madre de Dios River and Tributaries (Fenamad), says that conditions may worsen if other projects go ahead.
One is the planned construction of six hydro-electric dams in Peru to supply the Brazilian market.
Protests forced the Peruvian government to suspend this project and to start a process of local consultation.
Using new technology and holding regional summits are ways to co-ordinate protests, but indigenous campaigners are also building on relationships that existed long before national boundaries and laws were established.
Marcela Vecchione, from the Pro-Indian Commission (CPI) in the Brazilian state of Acre, in Brazil, says that in many areas, indigenous communities are divided by artificial boundaries.
That is the case of the Manchineri people, divided by a border in 1904 when Brazil annexed the state of Acre.
“I often visit my family on the other side of the border. For me, travelling from Peru to Brazil means only crossing a river,” says Geraldo Manchineri.
But thanks to technology, communication across much longer distances has become easier.
Indigenous leaders hope to take advantage of this new way of co-ordinating and gather 1,200 people in Rio de Janeiro this June when world leaders will come together for the Rio+20 meeting.

selchieproductions:

Latin American indigenous groups join forces to fight dams
© BBC Brasil

When Brazilian indigenous leader Tashka Yawanawa saw the news on television that communities from Peru were campaigning to prevent the construction of dams close to their land, he had no doubt about how he could help.

He turned on his computer, and using Skype, he contacted indigenous movements involved in the protest to offer both his support and to publicise the cause in Brazil.

“Today, indigenous groups can no longer escape the white man’s technology,” says Mr Yawanawa.

“We have to update ourselves, and prepare to face this new world.”

He belongs to the Yawanawa people, who live in the Brazilian Amazon, an area where indigenous communities have also fought many battles against hydroelectric dams.

He leads an organisation that seeks to build links with similar movements in other Latin American countries so they can learn from each other’s campaigns.

His initiative reflects an unprecedented effort among the region’s indigenous groups, as they join forces to resist major projects which they see as damaging to their territories.

It is part of a growing conflict as governments, seeking what they say is badly needed economic growth, build roads and hydro-electric dams, and exploit natural resources such as oil, copper and gold.

At the same time, indigenous groups say they are fighting to ensure that their traditional way of life is preserved.

Skype is one tool they are using to co-ordinate campaigns, alongside more traditional tactics such as adopting a unified position in international organisations including the UN and the Organisation of American States (OAS).

“We are mapping all the achievements of our fellow indigenous peoples in the continent in order to use their experiences here in Brazil,” says Marcos Apurina from the Co-ordination of Indigenous Organisations of the Brazilian Amazon (Coiab).

“Our problems are almost identical to the native peoples of other countries.”

‘Green economy’

This approach has been led by large national indigenous organisations and regional movements such as the Co-ordination of Indigenous Organisations of the Amazon Basin (Coica).

Coica operates across national boundaries, helping groups in Ecuador, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Guyana, French Guiana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela.

Coica’s work also involves organising meetings and workshops to help indigenous communities learn about international conventions, and also tips on lobbying and dealing with people in positions of power.

These gatherings allow indigenous leaders to discuss ways of putting pressure on governments to demarcate their territories.

They also discuss how international bodies can help guarantee indigenous rights or prevent major economic projects from having a detrimental impact.

“We are concerned about the new form of development known as the ‘green economy’. We understand this as an effort to exploit natural resources in indigenous territories,” says Rodrigo de la Cruz from Coica.

Several projects in the Brazil-Peru border region aim to expand the economic and transport integration between the two countries in the coming years.

The Inter-Oceanic Highway, connecting the north-west of Brazil to Peruvian ports on the Pacific coast, was inaugurated in 2011.

According to indigenous movements, this has brought several problems to the region, such as deforestation and illegal mining.

Jaime Corisepa, president of the Native Federation of Madre de Dios River and Tributaries (Fenamad), says that conditions may worsen if other projects go ahead.

One is the planned construction of six hydro-electric dams in Peru to supply the Brazilian market.

Protests forced the Peruvian government to suspend this project and to start a process of local consultation.

Using new technology and holding regional summits are ways to co-ordinate protests, but indigenous campaigners are also building on relationships that existed long before national boundaries and laws were established.

Marcela Vecchione, from the Pro-Indian Commission (CPI) in the Brazilian state of Acre, in Brazil, says that in many areas, indigenous communities are divided by artificial boundaries.

That is the case of the Manchineri people, divided by a border in 1904 when Brazil annexed the state of Acre.

“I often visit my family on the other side of the border. For me, travelling from Peru to Brazil means only crossing a river,” says Geraldo Manchineri.

But thanks to technology, communication across much longer distances has become easier.

Indigenous leaders hope to take advantage of this new way of co-ordinating and gather 1,200 people in Rio de Janeiro this June when world leaders will come together for the Rio+20 meeting.

selchieproductions:

In today’s ‘No shit, Sherlock’: UN body says that Brazil is violating indigenous rights
© Survival International
The International Labour Organization (ILO), part of the UN, has criticized the Brazilian government for failing to respect indigenous peoples’ rights.
The ILO has stated that by failing to consult Indians about the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam, Brazil has violated the ILO’s Convention 169 on indigenous peoples’ rights, to which the country is a signatory.
Brazilian Indians have held several large-scale protests against the dam, which will bring devastation to their rainforest. The uncontacted Indians living in the area could suffer the greatest impacts.
Whilst visiting Europe to raise awareness about the dam’s dangers, indigenous spokeswoman Sheyla Juruna said, ‘The dams will bring irreversible cultural, social and environmental damage. We are being treated like animals – all our rights are being violated’.
Brazil’s Public Ministry and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered the government to suspend the dam construction until the Indians’ rights are respected, but the works continue.
The ILO has urged that the Indians be consulted ‘before the possible harmful effects [of the dam] are irreversible’.
Survival is urging all governments to ratify ILO 169, the only international law for tribal peoples.

selchieproductions:

In today’s ‘No shit, Sherlock’: UN body says that Brazil is violating indigenous rights

© Survival International

The International Labour Organization (ILO), part of the UN, has criticized the Brazilian government for failing to respect indigenous peoples’ rights.

The ILO has stated that by failing to consult Indians about the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam, Brazil has violated the ILO’s Convention 169 on indigenous peoples’ rights, to which the country is a signatory.

Brazilian Indians have held several large-scale protests against the dam, which will bring devastation to their rainforest. The uncontacted Indians living in the area could suffer the greatest impacts.

Whilst visiting Europe to raise awareness about the dam’s dangers, indigenous spokeswoman Sheyla Juruna said, ‘The dams will bring irreversible cultural, social and environmental damage. We are being treated like animals – all our rights are being violated’.

Brazil’s Public Ministry and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered the government to suspend the dam construction until the Indians’ rights are respected, but the works continue.

The ILO has urged that the Indians be consulted ‘before the possible harmful effects [of the dam] are irreversible’.

Survival is urging all governments to ratify ILO 169, the only international law for tribal peoples.

selchieproductions:

Two promotional posters for the indigenous documentary Games of the North, which, to quote the director;

follows the lives of four Native Alaskan athletes as they compete in the traditional sports of their ancestors. Mental strength and physical endurance are tested with contests of high kicking to seal hopping.

But such games are more than sport—they instill a survival instinct for living in the Arctic, building perseverance, strength and Alaska Native values. The film’s footage showcases the diverse Alaskan landscape and its peoples. Games gives viewers a first-hand glimpse of the environmental changes in the Arctic – and the effect these changes have on the traditional peoples. While filming, Stanton said, “In Point Hope, after the ice left, I remember feeling a loss. There was definitely a presence that was missing.”

“The sea ice here has been changing for the past 15 years but there was nobody to listen to us, recounted “Big Bob” Aiken, Native Games Coach and World Record Holder. “When they finally come around to listening, you know it’s a little late.”

“I feel the games are more important now, especially for the hunters who depend on the ice for survival, ‘cause of how quickly things are changing out there. It’s important to be aware of yourself and your surroundings and the games build that,” said World Champion David Thomas.

selchieproductions:

Gene Tagaban - The Raven Dancer
 Gene Tagaban, Cherokee, Filipino and Tlingit (Tak’deintaan Raven Freshwater Sockeye clan of Hoonah, Alaska, and the child of a Wooshkeetaan Eagle Shark clan or moiety of Juneau, Alaska).

selchieproductions:

Gene Tagaban - The Raven Dancer

Gene Tagaban, Cherokee, Filipino and Tlingit (Tak’deintaan Raven Freshwater Sockeye clan of Hoonah, Alaska, and the child of a Wooshkeetaan Eagle Shark clan or moiety of Juneau, Alaska).

wingsofashandeyesoffire:

THIS is where I rose out of. Like a phoenix. 

badlandspolaroid:

BLEHHHHH ON AARON HUEY. But Yay for Oglala Lakota’s, because we’re teh shit. 

wuling09:

http://www.du.edu/tedxdu/video/huey.html - talk by Aaron Huey

http://www.aaronhuey.com/ - his legit website, with AMAZING photos.  One of my favourite series is his work done in the Pine Ridge reservation for the Lakota people - it looks at the nobility, and the poverty.  The work is incredible beautiful :).

He says, “The Lakota are one of many people who were moved off their land to prisoner of war camps - now called reservations.  The Pine Ridge Reservation…is sometimes referred to as Prisoner of War Camp #334, and it is where the Lakota now live.  

“I’m white, and that is a huge barrier on an Indian Reservation…On Pine Ridge, I will always be called washichu - a Lakota word that means “non-Indian”.  But, another version of this word means, “one who takes the best meat for himself”…It means greedy…If we look at our lives, we have indeed, taken the best part of the meat.  Let us look today, at a set of photographs of people who lost, so that we could gain…These photographs are not just of the Lakota, they stand for all indigenous people.

“The last chapter in any successful genocide, is one in which the oppressor can remove their hands and say, ‘My God! What are these people doing to themselves? They’re killing each other, they’re killing themselves, while we watch them die.” Prisoners are still born into prisoner of war camps, long after the guards are gone.   These are the bones left, after the best meat has been taken.

“As removed as we, the dominant society, may feel, from a massacre in 1890, or a series of broken treaties a hundred and fifty years ago, I still have to ask you the question, how should you feel about the statistics of today? …the suffering of indigenous people is not something simple to fix.  The fix, as it’s called, may be more difficult to the dominant society, than a $50 cheque, or a church trip to paint some graffiti covered houses, or a suburban family donating a box of clothes they don’t even want any more.  Honour the treaties, give back the black hills.”

It’s so powerful, so ignored, the significance of the indigenous people.  Peace cannot come while this remains so.  

(via hissingbooth)

Retronaut's "Steampunk Native Americans"

theoldenfuture:

I don’t really get the steampunk feel from this. It’s awesome looking and seems almost like something out of Shadowrun. Like a tribe stuck in the lower levels of a hive city cobbling together ritual outfits from scrapped electronics and preparing their tech-shaman for vision quests inside of cybernetic realms.

Yeah… Definitely tripping my racism-senses. 

God, I hate things and people. 

notpeppermintpatty:

Brought to you by Eaux Vives Water and KBS+P Canada! 

Also, I can’t wait to read the comments where some ignorant people will protest that their right to enjoy and engage in and with racist materials is being impeded by those awful minorities who are into “political correctness”.

My reactions:

0:00 Well, this is a bit silly, but okay…. 

0:18 Well, the eagle sound and the arrow are a bit much…

0:23 Wait… Wait… The fuck? Seriously? The fuck? Seriously?

But seriously, folks… What? Just plain… What? Does racism really help sell things?

life:

HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY! — get those sparklers ready! What is everyone doing for the holiday? While you’re deciding…. have a look at vintage photos of Fourth of July Back in the Day.

Just putting this out there… I can’t say I’m a fan of this image in particular.

life:

HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY! — get those sparklers ready! What is everyone doing for the holiday? While you’re deciding…. have a look at vintage photos of Fourth of July Back in the Day.

Just putting this out there… I can’t say I’m a fan of this image in particular.