fifigoggo:

Fabric shopping in Ghana’s busy and bustling Makola Market

One of my favourite market-related activities in Côte d’Ivoire, after people watching and trying not to alarm small children with my epic pastiness.

(via blueklectic)

ghanailoveyou:

Fresh coconut on the street. The best thing.

ghanailoveyou:

Fresh coconut on the street. The best thing.

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

collective-history:

Image of an Ashanti home before British colonization

collective-history:

Image of an Ashanti home before British colonization

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

anotherafrica:

Sword-bearers in front of Asantehene Otomfuo Nana Opoku Ware II, Kumasi, Ghana.
By Elisofon, Eliot.

The photograph depicts Asantehene Otomfuo Nana Opoku Ware II, on the occasion of the state visit of the Ya Na, paramount chief of Dagomba, Northern Region, Ghana. “Paramount chiefs maintain a group of sword-bearers, each of whom carries one of the state swords on public occasions. But while swords are thus essential items of regalia, their use is symbolic. Many sword ornaments were cast earlier in this century to enhance the prestige of the chief. Popular ones were the highly valued red cockle shells, also the skulls of wild animals. In Ghana, the pendant gold heads were usually attached to state swords, where they represent the head of enemies killed in battle.” [Timothy F. Garrard, 1989: Gold of Africa, Prestel]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.

Image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute.

anotherafrica:

Sword-bearers in front of Asantehene Otomfuo Nana Opoku Ware II, Kumasi, Ghana.
By Elisofon, Eliot.

The photograph depicts Asantehene Otomfuo Nana Opoku Ware II, on the occasion of the state visit of the Ya Na, paramount chief of Dagomba, Northern Region, Ghana. “Paramount chiefs maintain a group of sword-bearers, each of whom carries one of the state swords on public occasions. But while swords are thus essential items of regalia, their use is symbolic. Many sword ornaments were cast earlier in this century to enhance the prestige of the chief. Popular ones were the highly valued red cockle shells, also the skulls of wild animals. In Ghana, the pendant gold heads were usually attached to state swords, where they represent the head of enemies killed in battle.” [Timothy F. Garrard, 1989: Gold of Africa, Prestel]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.

Image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute.

cosmicyoruba:

ilyasafrika:

37thstate:

Bling

MOLOWO NONI!

Baba God noni!

cosmicyoruba:

ilyasafrika:

37thstate:

Bling

MOLOWO NONI!

Baba God noni!

(Source: messrsrr, via alwaystheoviereya)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Mao Zedong greets Ghana’s President Kwame Nkrumah at a July 28, 1962, meeting in Hangchow, China.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Mao Zedong greets Ghana’s President Kwame Nkrumah at a July 28, 1962, meeting in Hangchow, China.

kilele:

Daily life along the Cape Coast, Ghana
Photo by Hauke Steinberg

kilele:

Daily life along the Cape Coast, Ghana

Photo by Hauke Steinberg

(via )

ghanalife:

GhanaNewspaper ad, 1969.

ghanalife:

Ghana
Newspaper ad, 1969.

(via )

fyeahafrica:

In December 1941, the Japanese invasion of Burma (now Myanmar) opened what would be the longest land campaign fought by the British in the Second World War. It began with defeat and retreat for Britain, as Rangoon fell to the Japanese in March 1942.

But the fighting went on, over a varied terrain of jungles, mountains, plains and wide rivers, until the Japanese forces surrendered in August 1945.

Some 100,000 African soldiers were taken from British colonies to fight in the jungles of Burma against the Japanese. They performed heroically in one of the most brutal theatres of war, yet their contribution has been largely ignored, both in Britain and their now independent home countries.

In the villages of Nigeria and Ghana, these veterans are known as ‘the Burma Boys’. They brought back terrifying tales from faraway lands. Few survived, even fewer are alive today.

Al Jazeera’s Barnaby Phillips travels to Nigeria, Burma and Japan to find a Nigerian veteran of the war and to talk to those who fought alongside him as well as against him. He even finds the family that saved the life of the wounded veteran in the jungles of Myanmar.

(Source: )

fyeahafrica:

Beautiful textiles from Ghana

via ghanalife

(via )

ghanalife:

GhanaNewspaper ad, 1969. Pepsodent is the toothpaste of choice in Ghana, partly because it’s been around for a long time. It’s so popular, Ghanaians are used to calling any toothpaste brand “Pesodent”. So, instead of toothpaste we say Pepsodent.

ghanalife:

Ghana
Newspaper ad, 1969. Pepsodent is the toothpaste of choice in Ghana, partly because it’s been around for a long time. It’s so popular, Ghanaians are used to calling any toothpaste brand “Pesodent”. So, instead of toothpaste we say Pepsodent.

(via )

afrographique:

An infographic depicting the percentage share of formal firms that are owned by women in Africa. Data from the World Bank.

afrographique:

An infographic depicting the percentage share of formal firms that are owned by women in Africa. Data from the World Bank.

(via )