lucidstrike:

thewhitemankilledthetruth:

Asian/Black relations is a conversation that pops in Philly media every so often and no one asks the right questions

There was this huge rash black kids just kicking the shit out of asian immigrant kids at southeast philly high the last few years

And it took the media so long to get to the bottom of things

These black kids didn’t hate these kids because they were Asian (as it was framed originally)

They were mad because a lot of these were straight up NEW to America, only here for a few years

And they were getting treated better in the classroom than them by white teachers

Their weaknesses (poor English for most of them) weren’t being written off as symptomatic of them as Asian people, but merely a minor bump in their learning

And black kids were not getting that same courtesy

So yeah that made them fucking angry.

When Asian folk are pigeonholed as “model minorities”, that’s white supremacy. When black folk attack Asian folk as “model minorities”, that too is white supremacy. When the media does not acknowledge that, again, white supremacy rears its ugly head.

On a related note, with the help of Asian Americans United (AAU), BPSOS-Delaware Valley, Victim/Witness Services of South Philadelphia, and the Asian Student Association of Philadelphia, a lot of the kids from that incident a few years ago put together an exhibit called We Cannot Keep Silent’ that’s worth checkin’ out. It’s open through March 2013 at least.

More POC solidarity, less participation in our collective oppression. Onward to liberation.image

(Source: youngbadmangone, via downlo)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Artwork by Teresa Miroslaw

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Artwork by Teresa Miroslaw

(Source: fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

(Source: seartchanddestroy, via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

April 29: 20th anniversary of the Los Angeles Rebellion against racism following the “not guilty” verdict for police in the Rodney King beating.
Flyer issued by the Movement for a People’s Assembly demanding amnesty for the 18,000 people rounded by the LAPD and National Guard during the 1992 rebellion.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

April 29: 20th anniversary of the Los Angeles Rebellion against racism following the “not guilty” verdict for police in the Rodney King beating.

Flyer issued by the Movement for a People’s Assembly demanding amnesty for the 18,000 people rounded by the LAPD and National Guard during the 1992 rebellion.

thepoliticalnotebook:

Shaima Alawadi, a 32-year-old Iraqi woman living in Southern California, was taken off life support today, succumbing to injuries sustained in a brutal tire iron beating on Wednesday. Shaima was found in her living room, and according to her daughter Fatima and the police investigating, a note was found near her saying “Go back to your country, you terrorist.”

Shaima was a mother of five who has been in the US with her family since the mid-1990s. She was described by her friend Sura Alzaidy as “respectful modest muhajiba.” Her daughter tearfully addressed her mother’s attackers during a media interview, saying “You took my mother away from me. You took my best friend away from me. Why? Why did you do it?”

[Daily MailAFP]

[H/T: thatsassyarab]

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

"In the 1870s, anti-Chinese sentiment began to flourish in California, leading the California legislature in 1874 to pass an immigration law requiring that steamships post a $500 bond for the landing of any “lewd or debauched woman.” While the statute spoke generally, it aimed particularly to prevent the immigration of Chinese prostitutes, and the state commissioner of immigration refused to land twenty-two Chinese women whom he believed to be “lewd or debauched.” In In re Ah Fong, the California Supreme Court upheld the law as a valid exercise of the state’s “police power” to protect public safety and order, but Justice Field in the U.S. circuit court for California found the law unconstitutional. He held that Congress, not the states, had authority to regulate commerce between the United States and other nations, and that authority extended to immigration. More importantly for later Chinese litigation, Field found the law violated the Burlingame Treaty of 1868, in which Chinese were explicitly granted the right of free migration and all of the rights and privileges of subjects of other nations. He also ruled it violated the Fourteenth Amendment, which stated “no state … shall deny any person equal protection of the laws.” Field ruled that the Equal Protection Clause applied to all people in the United States, citizens and foreign residents alike. Since the California law singled out Chinese, it treated them unequally and thus trampled on both treaty and constitutional rights. The Supreme Court agreed with Field’s decision when, in a separate appeal of the California Supreme Court’s decision in Chy Lung v. Freeman, it held the California law unconstitutional on the grounds that Congress had exclusive power to regulate foreign commerce and immigration. The cases were important in establishing the importance of the treaties and the Fourteenth Amendment as barriers to discrimination against Chinese."

via Chinese Exclusion and the Federal Courts (via of-praxis)

(via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

genderfuked:

I dedicate these pictures to my cousin who may get deported before he’s able to finish university.

(Source: tranqualizer, via the--circle-of-life-deactivated)

bayisbetter:

This is what we do to the side of laundromats in San Francisco.

bayisbetter:

This is what we do to the side of laundromats in San Francisco.

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

On the West's Moral Panic Over 'Multiculturalism'

downlo:

A good summary of the state of multiculturalism in western politics these days. Despite what some rightwing types would have you belief, multiculturalism is not and never has been hegemonic. It remains an unfulfilled ideal, a whipping boy, a seed of contention:

…“[O]thers” have to be distinguished in the popular mind from other “others.” So when black people attack other black people it is no longer crime but “black-on-black-crime;” if a young Muslim woman in killed over a romantic relationship it is not a murder but an “honor killing.” In a country like England that has been embroiled in virtually continuous terrorist conflict for the last forty years in Northern Ireland, the notion that there are “home-grown” Muslim bombers is supposed to represent not just a new demographic taking up armed struggle but an entirely new phenomenon. Even as the Catholic Church is embroiled in a global crisis over child sexual abuse and the Church of England is splintered in a row over gay priests, Islam and Muslims face particularly vehement demands to denounce homophobia.

The combined effect of these flawed distinctions and sweeping demonization is to unleash a series of moral panics. In 2009 in Switzerland, a national referendum banned the building of minarets in a country that has only four; in 2010, 70 per cent of voters in the state of Oklahoma support the banning of sharia law even though Muslims comprise less than 0.1 per cent of the population; in the Netherlands parliament seriously considered banning the burka–-a garment believed to be worn by fewer than fifty women in the entire country. Disproportionate in scale and distorted in nature, these actions cannot be understood as a viable response to their named targets but rather as emblems of a broader, deeper disruption in national, racial and religious identities. At a time of diminishing national sovereignty, particularly in Europe, such campaigns help the national imagination cohere around a fixed identity even as the ability of the nation-state to actually govern itself wanes. It is a curious and paradoxical fact that as national boundaries in Europe have started to fade, the electoral appeal of nationalism has increased….

But such assaults are by no means the preserve of the far right. Many who consider themselves on the left have given liberal cover to these assaults on religious and racial minorities, ostensibly acting in defense of democracy, Enlightenment values and equal rights—particularly relating to sexual orientation and gender. Their positioning rests on two major acts of sophistry. The first is an elision between Western values and liberal values that ignores the fact that liberal values are not fully entrenched in the West and that other regions of the world also have liberal traditions. Nowhere is this clearer than with gay rights, where whatever gains do exist are recent and highly contested. Thirty American states have constitutional amendments banning gay marriage, and only a handful of states have passed gay marriage through the popular legislative process. Not only is gay equality not a Western value, it’s not even a Californian value. The second is a desire to understand Western “values” in abstraction from Western practice. This surge in extolling Western virtues has coincided with an illegal war that has been underpinned by both authorized and unauthorized torture and a range of other atrocities and a spike in the electoral and political currency of racism and xenophobia.