selchieproductions:

In today’s ‘No shit, Sherlock’: UN body says that Brazil is violating indigenous rights
© Survival International
The International Labour Organization (ILO), part of the UN, has criticized the Brazilian government for failing to respect indigenous peoples’ rights.
The ILO has stated that by failing to consult Indians about the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam, Brazil has violated the ILO’s Convention 169 on indigenous peoples’ rights, to which the country is a signatory.
Brazilian Indians have held several large-scale protests against the dam, which will bring devastation to their rainforest. The uncontacted Indians living in the area could suffer the greatest impacts.
Whilst visiting Europe to raise awareness about the dam’s dangers, indigenous spokeswoman Sheyla Juruna said, ‘The dams will bring irreversible cultural, social and environmental damage. We are being treated like animals – all our rights are being violated’.
Brazil’s Public Ministry and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered the government to suspend the dam construction until the Indians’ rights are respected, but the works continue.
The ILO has urged that the Indians be consulted ‘before the possible harmful effects [of the dam] are irreversible’.
Survival is urging all governments to ratify ILO 169, the only international law for tribal peoples.

selchieproductions:

In today’s ‘No shit, Sherlock’: UN body says that Brazil is violating indigenous rights

© Survival International

The International Labour Organization (ILO), part of the UN, has criticized the Brazilian government for failing to respect indigenous peoples’ rights.

The ILO has stated that by failing to consult Indians about the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam, Brazil has violated the ILO’s Convention 169 on indigenous peoples’ rights, to which the country is a signatory.

Brazilian Indians have held several large-scale protests against the dam, which will bring devastation to their rainforest. The uncontacted Indians living in the area could suffer the greatest impacts.

Whilst visiting Europe to raise awareness about the dam’s dangers, indigenous spokeswoman Sheyla Juruna said, ‘The dams will bring irreversible cultural, social and environmental damage. We are being treated like animals – all our rights are being violated’.

Brazil’s Public Ministry and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered the government to suspend the dam construction until the Indians’ rights are respected, but the works continue.

The ILO has urged that the Indians be consulted ‘before the possible harmful effects [of the dam] are irreversible’.

Survival is urging all governments to ratify ILO 169, the only international law for tribal peoples.

selchieproductions:

Guarani man dies of gunshot wound following attack © Survival International
 A Guarani Indian from central Brazil has died of his injuries, two years after his community was attacked by gunmen.
Rosalino Lopes, 50, was shot in the abdomen and left paralyzed when his community, Pyelito Kuê, was attacked in 2009.
The gunmen were allegedly employed by the ranchers now occupying the Guarani’s land.
Before he died, Lopes said, ‘I am dying for the ancestral land where I was born. I wanted to return to Pyelito Kuê and live there with my family… Let all our indigenous relatives, and the authorities, know that the wound I received from the gunmen is killing me. I can’t go on any longer’.
The attack followed an attempt by Lopes’s community to reoccupy their land. A more recent attempt at reoccupation also resulted in violence: earlier this year, truckloads of armed men invaded the community, set houses on fire and left several people seriously injured.
The Guarani have been suffering increasing levels of aggression and threats in recent months, as gunmen are targeting prominent leaders who are reported to be named on a hit list.
Last month, gunmen executed a Guarani man in front of his community.
In recent decades, vast areas of Guarani land have been taken from the Indians, to make way for cattle ranching and soya and sugarcane plantations.
The Brazilian government is responsible for mapping out the Guarani’s land and returning it to them, but this process has come to a near stand-still.
Meanwhile, the Guarani are living in appalling conditions, with disease, malnutrition, violence and suicide rife.
Survival is lobbying the Brazilian authorities and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, to ensure that urgent measures are taken to protect the Guarani.
Download Survival’s report to the UN, outlining the Guarani’s plight.

selchieproductions:

Guarani man dies of gunshot wound following attack 
© Survival International

 A Guarani Indian from central Brazil has died of his injuries, two years after his community was attacked by gunmen.

Rosalino Lopes, 50, was shot in the abdomen and left paralyzed when his community, Pyelito Kuê, was attacked in 2009.

The gunmen were allegedly employed by the ranchers now occupying the Guarani’s land.

Before he died, Lopes said, ‘I am dying for the ancestral land where I was born. I wanted to return to Pyelito Kuê and live there with my family… Let all our indigenous relatives, and the authorities, know that the wound I received from the gunmen is killing me. I can’t go on any longer’.

The attack followed an attempt by Lopes’s community to reoccupy their land. A more recent attempt at reoccupation also resulted in violence: earlier this year, truckloads of armed men invaded the community, set houses on fire and left several people seriously injured.

The Guarani have been suffering increasing levels of aggression and threats in recent months, as gunmen are targeting prominent leaders who are reported to be named on a hit list.

Last month, gunmen executed a Guarani man in front of his community.

In recent decades, vast areas of Guarani land have been taken from the Indians, to make way for cattle ranching and soya and sugarcane plantations.

The Brazilian government is responsible for mapping out the Guarani’s land and returning it to them, but this process has come to a near stand-still.

Meanwhile, the Guarani are living in appalling conditions, with disease, malnutrition, violence and suicide rife.

Survival is lobbying the Brazilian authorities and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, to ensure that urgent measures are taken to protect the Guarani.

Download Survival’s report to the UN, outlining the Guarani’s plight.

selchieproductions:

[Image: Portrait photo of Xoroxloo Duxee died of dehydration after the Bushmen’s water borehole was disabled.]
© Survival International
Ten hidden abuses against indigenous peoples
Survival is releasing ten tribal rights abuses ahead of UN Human Rights Day this Saturday, to expose violations that still pass largely unnoticed.
Signed 63 years ago, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was the first global expression of the rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled.
Yet despite its creation in 1948, systematic abuses against the rights of tribal peoples have remained hidden, or continue to occur far from the public eye.
Here are ten examples, some of which are addressed in Stephen Corry’s, ‘Tribal peoples for tomorrow’s world’, which is now also available to buy on Amazon.
Aboriginal Australians only gained voting rights at both federal and state level in 1965. It took another two years to include them in the national census.
Australia’s ‘Stolen Generation; children of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent were forcibly removed from their families by authorities, until as recently as the 1970s.
In 2010 tourists in Botswana relaxed around a swimming pool in the middle of the Kalahari Desert, whilst Bushmen were refused access to water, despite having secured historic rights to their land.
Uganda’s Batwa pygmies never hunted gorillas, but were evicted from their forest in 1991, under the pretense of protecting the primates. The pygmies are now refugees.
The stuffed body of a Bushman, known as ‘El Negro of Banyoles’, was displayed in a Spanish museum until 1997, when widespread protests led to its removal. The remains were buried in Botswana in 2000.
Gunmen with hit lists are executing high-profile Indian leaders in Brazil. Cattle ranchers employ them to stop the Guarani returning to their land.
Massacre and disease killed one in every five Yanomami in Brazil during the 1980s, until international pressure forced Brazil to evict gold miners.
In what are now recognized as ‘Human Safaris’, tourists treat the indigenous Jarawa of India’s Andaman Islands like animals by throwing them food.
‘Potlatch’, a gift-giving custom practised by indigenous peoples in Canada and US, was outlawed as ‘contrary to civilised values’ in 1884. It took until 1951 for the law to be repealed.
Under Stalin’s Soviet rule, Siberian shamans were actively persecuted. By 1980, some believed they had disappeared altogether.
Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘One of the reasons for the continuing human rights abuses of tribal peoples is that the UN’s Declaration is not legally enforceable. That’s why all those who oppose these crimes against humanity should vigorously campaign for the worldwide ratification of the international law ILO 169, which is binding.’

selchieproductions:

[Image: Portrait photo of Xoroxloo Duxee died of dehydration after the Bushmen’s water borehole was disabled.]

© Survival International

Ten hidden abuses against indigenous peoples

Survival is releasing ten tribal rights abuses ahead of UN Human Rights Day this Saturday, to expose violations that still pass largely unnoticed.

Signed 63 years ago, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was the first global expression of the rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled.

Yet despite its creation in 1948, systematic abuses against the rights of tribal peoples have remained hidden, or continue to occur far from the public eye.

Here are ten examples, some of which are addressed in Stephen Corry’s, ‘Tribal peoples for tomorrow’s world’, which is now also available to buy on Amazon.

  1. Aboriginal Australians only gained voting rights at both federal and state level in 1965. It took another two years to include them in the national census.
  2. Australia’s ‘Stolen Generation; children of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent were forcibly removed from their families by authorities, until as recently as the 1970s.
  3. In 2010 tourists in Botswana relaxed around a swimming pool in the middle of the Kalahari Desert, whilst Bushmen were refused access to water, despite having secured historic rights to their land.
  4. Uganda’s Batwa pygmies never hunted gorillas, but were evicted from their forest in 1991, under the pretense of protecting the primates. The pygmies are now refugees.
  5. The stuffed body of a Bushman, known as ‘El Negro of Banyoles’, was displayed in a Spanish museum until 1997, when widespread protests led to its removal. The remains were buried in Botswana in 2000.
  6. Gunmen with hit lists are executing high-profile Indian leaders in Brazil. Cattle ranchers employ them to stop the Guarani returning to their land.
  7. Massacre and disease killed one in every five Yanomami in Brazil during the 1980s, until international pressure forced Brazil to evict gold miners.
  8. In what are now recognized as ‘Human Safaris’, tourists treat the indigenous Jarawa of India’s Andaman Islands like animals by throwing them food.
  9. ‘Potlatch’, a gift-giving custom practised by indigenous peoples in Canada and US, was outlawed as ‘contrary to civilised values’ in 1884. It took until 1951 for the law to be repealed.
  10. Under Stalin’s Soviet rule, Siberian shamans were actively persecuted. By 1980, some believed they had disappeared altogether.

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘One of the reasons for the continuing human rights abuses of tribal peoples is that the UN’s Declaration is not legally enforceable. That’s why all those who oppose these crimes against humanity should vigorously campaign for the worldwide ratification of the international law ILO 169, which is binding.’

selchieproductions:

[image: a portrait photo of Marcus Veron, a Guarani leader who was killed in 2003 during an attempt to return to his land.]
Brazilian gunmen brandish tribal hit list in wake of leader’s murder© Survival International 
Gunmen in Brazil are brazenly intimidating indigenous communities with a hit list of prominent leaders, following the high profile murder of Nísio Gomes last month.
Reportedly employed by powerful landowners in Mato Grosso do Sul state, the gunmen are creating a climate of fear to prevent Guarani Indians from returning to their ancestral land.
The tactics employed in recent incidents have been almost identical. Gunmen encircle vehicles transporting Guarani, force them to stop, and then verbally abuse and interrogate passengers about the names on the hit list.
One Guarani leader told Survival, ’They’ve pinpointed us and they’re set to kill us. We’re at great risk. Here in Brazil, we have no justice. We have nowhere left to run.’
On Sunday, around 100 Guarani returning from a meeting in the district of Iguatemi were targeted. Guarani witnesses told Survival one of the four men involved was a local mayor.
The Guarani said the men shouted insults such as, ‘We’re going to burn these buses full of Indians!’ Members of a government team were also present at the scene.
Continued threats have also forced the son of an assassinated leader to flee his community. Ranchers killed Marcos Veron in 2003 after he repeatedly tried to recover a small piece of his community’s ancestral land – his son Ladio is now being targeted.
Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This is yet another tragedy in a determined campaign to exterminate all Guaraní opposition to the theft of their land. The ranchers will stop at nothing to protect their interests, and it’s utterly shameful that the Brazilian government can’t stop these gunmen from acting outside the law.’
Gomes’ killers have yet to be arrested, but last week Brazil’s Public Ministry said six men had been charged with the murder of two Guarani teachers in 2009.
The accused include a notorious Brazilian rancher who held the teachers’ community hostage, and local politicians.

selchieproductions:

[image: a portrait photo of Marcus Veron, a Guarani leader who was killed in 2003 during an attempt to return to his land.]

Brazilian gunmen brandish tribal hit list in wake of leader’s murder
© Survival International 

Gunmen in Brazil are brazenly intimidating indigenous communities with a hit list of prominent leaders, following the high profile murder of Nísio Gomes last month.

Reportedly employed by powerful landowners in Mato Grosso do Sul state, the gunmen are creating a climate of fear to prevent Guarani Indians from returning to their ancestral land.

The tactics employed in recent incidents have been almost identical. Gunmen encircle vehicles transporting Guarani, force them to stop, and then verbally abuse and interrogate passengers about the names on the hit list.

One Guarani leader told Survival, ’They’ve pinpointed us and they’re set to kill us. We’re at great risk. Here in Brazil, we have no justice. We have nowhere left to run.’

On Sunday, around 100 Guarani returning from a meeting in the district of Iguatemi were targeted. Guarani witnesses told Survival one of the four men involved was a local mayor.

The Guarani said the men shouted insults such as, ‘We’re going to burn these buses full of Indians!’ Members of a government team were also present at the scene.

Continued threats have also forced the son of an assassinated leader to flee his community. Ranchers killed Marcos Veron in 2003 after he repeatedly tried to recover a small piece of his community’s ancestral land – his son Ladio is now being targeted.

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This is yet another tragedy in a determined campaign to exterminate all Guaraní opposition to the theft of their land. The ranchers will stop at nothing to protect their interests, and it’s utterly shameful that the Brazilian government can’t stop these gunmen from acting outside the law.’

Gomes’ killers have yet to be arrested, but last week Brazil’s Public Ministry said six men had been charged with the murder of two Guarani teachers in 2009.

The accused include a notorious Brazilian rancher who held the teachers’ community hostage, and local politicians.

selchieproductions:

Here’s a wonderful film about indigenous activism.

crankyindian:

lakalenyu:

ihavechortles:

[image: an outline of North and South America, with the text  “Illegal immigration is not a new problem. Native Americans used to call  it white people.”]
Reblogging for commentary.
moniquill:

janedoe225:

9gag:

Illegal immigration is not a new problem

that’s an understatement.

Sanguinity has an awesome post about this.
“ We are not your rhetorical pawns. Stop imagining what Native people think/feel/believe about U.S. immigration. If you want to go after Muslims or Latinos or whoeverall, stop using us to do it. And if you’re criticizing U.S. xenophobia and nationalism,   thus defending Muslims, Latinos, and whoever else needs it — well, I   personally approve of the goal, but I can’t say that I’m much pleased   with the method of white people once again using imaginary Indians to   score a quick point off of each other.”
Go read the rest of it. I’ll wait.
Read it? Ok, let’s continue.
Modern issues with US immigration are not remotely on the same continuum with colonialism and genocide (both physical and cultural) suffered by indigenous peoples. Comparing them as if they are is hugely insulting regardless of your intention or the direction of your comparison. Current immigrants to the US are not coming to slaughter current US inhabitants, steal that land, dismantle their culture, unseat their government and install their own, steal their children and reeducate them in culturally-erasing ways, appropriate their shattered cultures, etc, etc. There is no modern Manifest Destiny, unless it’s the one that the US is itself perpetuating through continued colonialism and globalization of American corporations and American interests.
Stop making this analogy.


UGH, YES. THIS THIS THIS. I have been trying for ages to put into words why this analogy irks the living fuck out of me and Moniquill nailed it. Immigration is NOT the same as colonization and it is insulting as all fuck to make that comparison.

There we go. Thats some good commentary right there.

Damn, I consider myself TOLD.

crankyindian:

lakalenyu:

ihavechortles:

[image: an outline of North and South America, with the text “Illegal immigration is not a new problem. Native Americans used to call it white people.”]

Reblogging for commentary.

moniquill:

janedoe225:

9gag:

Illegal immigration is not a new problem

that’s an understatement.

Sanguinity has an awesome post about this.

We are not your rhetorical pawns. Stop imagining what Native people think/feel/believe about U.S. immigration. If you want to go after Muslims or Latinos or whoeverall, stop using us to do it. And if you’re criticizing U.S. xenophobia and nationalism, thus defending Muslims, Latinos, and whoever else needs it — well, I personally approve of the goal, but I can’t say that I’m much pleased with the method of white people once again using imaginary Indians to score a quick point off of each other.”

Go read the rest of it. I’ll wait.

Read it? Ok, let’s continue.

Modern issues with US immigration are not remotely on the same continuum with colonialism and genocide (both physical and cultural) suffered by indigenous peoples. Comparing them as if they are is hugely insulting regardless of your intention or the direction of your comparison. Current immigrants to the US are not coming to slaughter current US inhabitants, steal that land, dismantle their culture, unseat their government and install their own, steal their children and reeducate them in culturally-erasing ways, appropriate their shattered cultures, etc, etc. There is no modern Manifest Destiny, unless it’s the one that the US is itself perpetuating through continued colonialism and globalization of American corporations and American interests.

Stop making this analogy.

UGH, YES. THIS THIS THIS. I have been trying for ages to put into words why this analogy irks the living fuck out of me and Moniquill nailed it. Immigration is NOT the same as colonization and it is insulting as all fuck to make that comparison.

There we go. Thats some good commentary right there.

Damn, I consider myself TOLD.

(via auberginebreeze-deactivated2013)

(via auberginebreeze-deactivated2013)

life:

HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY! — get those sparklers ready! What is everyone doing for the holiday? While you’re deciding…. have a look at vintage photos of Fourth of July Back in the Day.

Just putting this out there… I can’t say I’m a fan of this image in particular.

life:

HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY! — get those sparklers ready! What is everyone doing for the holiday? While you’re deciding…. have a look at vintage photos of Fourth of July Back in the Day.

Just putting this out there… I can’t say I’m a fan of this image in particular.

Kahs: WHY ARE UNIVERSITIES HERE IN AUCKLAND SO FUCKING RACIST?!

crankyindian:

hyphywifey:

kahsennanoron:

linda-nz:

http://www.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/cs-pacific-student-support

So…Pacific and Maori students get special support at University. WTF?!
This is just racist.

Why don’t they make programmes for GENERAL people with less money and bad family background.

Usually I try to keep my posts and responses personal,  but I feel like I needed to comment on this one. 

First off I looked through the school website and found numerous services offered to “GENERAL people”. Have you looked through the other sections of the site rather than simply focusing on this one aspect? Everyone is offered support in their schools, you usually have to look for it or ask for it though. The majority of students in many schools are White students - how is this fair to Non-White students? It’s not fair either - you have to look at both sides of the story here. 

Secondly, this is not racist. How is supporting Indigenous people’s education racist? Indigenous people from all over the world face many more issues than Non-Aboriginal people, especially in relation to education. Our levels of education usually tend to be lower. Not only do we have issues with lower education levels, but also lower life expectancy, higher rates or abuse, higher rates of discrimination, higher rates of poverty, etc. The list can continue for literally pages. 

Thirdly the way that your post was written seems extremely racist towards Indigenous people. Especially how you chose to use the wording “GENERAL people” to describe any Non-Maori or Non-Pacific Islanders. Maori people and people from the Pacific Islands are people too. 

Fourthly (and last but not least) I utilize these special services at schools in Canada (services for Aboriginal people). Without these services I would have struggled much more than I have. It’s difficult when you have to face discrimination and racism in schools. It’s difficult when people like yourself don’t take the time to understand and learn about Indigenous people. It’s difficult when people won’t associate with you or work with you when they find out what ethnicity you are - these are all things we have to deal with as Indigenous people. Not that long ago many Indigenous people were not even allowed into schools or the same schools as Non-Indigenous people. 

Even if you are upset about something, it doesn’t mean that it’s ok to be racist. It also doesn’t mean that you can use offensive words or discriminate against Non-White ethnicities. I have to hear a lot of racist comments towards me every single day of my life, but it doesn’t mean I can be racist also. You can’t fight a fire with gasoline. Please think before you speak, you never know who may be listening

Dear Racists,

We’re listening.

Sincerely,

People who are racially discriminated against.

Also, there are literally scholarships and bursaries for everything. Do some research. I’d personally rather have to write essays and fill out applications than have a family history of genocide and residential schools but sorry guess I’m being racist.

Quit whining and educate yourself. And again, because I can’t seem to say it enough, Indigenous people are people too. 

(Source: lindadelray, via auberginebreeze-deactivated2013)