tokyo-fashion:

Raining tonight in Harajuku - Takeshita Dori not too crowded!

tokyo-fashion:

Raining tonight in Harajuku - Takeshita Dori not too crowded!

(Source: streetsnapfashion)

black-coffee-bonus-cup:

Shonen Knife

black-coffee-bonus-cup:

Shonen Knife

(via deadlybite)

thisisnotjapan:

yeah I think Dita Von Whatever needs to retire.

thisisnotjapan:

yeah I think Dita Von Whatever needs to retire.

(Source: bonsoir-beatrix)

japanlove:

Shinkyo Bridge, Nikko by mountain wanderer on Flickr.

japanlove:

Shinkyo Bridge, Nikko by mountain wanderer on Flickr.

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Train with Japanese immigrants traveling to São Paulo from the port of Santos in Brazil (1935). 
Japanese immigration to Brazil began in earnest in the first decade of the twentieth century, with the first group of immigrants arriving aboard the ship Kasato Maru in 1908. Over 150,000 immigrants landed in Brazil between 1917 and 1940. Today Brazil has the largest Japanese population outside of Japan.

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Train with Japanese immigrants traveling to São Paulo from the port of Santos in Brazil (1935). 

Japanese immigration to Brazil began in earnest in the first decade of the twentieth century, with the first group of immigrants arriving aboard the ship Kasato Maru in 1908. Over 150,000 immigrants landed in Brazil between 1917 and 1940. Today Brazil has the largest Japanese population outside of Japan.

(via fylatinamericanhistory)

(Source: navyorange, via wa55up)

ohmyasian:

(via how-should-i-feel)GIF OF THE WEEK: SUSHI.

ohmyasian:

(via how-should-i-feel)

GIF OF THE WEEK: SUSHI.

(Source: exolyzed)

(Source: ch15, via cyberpunkhero)

whitecolonialism:

December 17, 1944: Internment of Japanese-Americans Comes to an End.

On December 17th, 1944 the United States under the direction of U.S. Major General Henry C. Pratt issued Public Proclamation No. 21 stating that on January 2nd, 1945 all Japanese-Americans “evacuees” from the West Coast could return back to their homes.

The internment of Japanese-Americans began exactly ten weeks after the Empire of Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which gave authorization for the removal of any or all people from military areas. As a result the military defined the entire West Coast, home to a majority of Japanese-Americans as military area. Within a couple of months over 110,000 Japanese-Americans were relocated to internment camps built by the US military scattered all over the nation. For the next two years Japanese-Americans would live under dire living conditions and at times abuse from their military guards.

Throughout World War II ten people were found to be spies for the Empire of Japan, not one of them was of Japanese ancestry. Forty-four year would pass until Ronald Reagan and the United States made an official apology to the surviving Japanese-Americans who were relocated, and were given $20,000 tax-free.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

neuromaencer:

Toshi Takahashi

neuromaencer:

Toshi Takahashi

(Source: fugu-suicide)

bushdog:

1967 Yamaha SG5A Red

bushdog:

1967 Yamaha SG5A Red

(via 5feet12inches)

endilletante:

Japon.
Werner Bischof.
Paris, 1955., 1955. B&W and color photography. 2nd printing. French text. 

endilletante:

Japon.

Werner Bischof.

Paris, 1955., 1955. B&W and color photography. 2nd printing. French text. 

(via 5feet12inches)

art-of-swords:

Japanese Votive Tanto Dagger

  • Dated: late 19th-early 20th century
  • Measurements: overall length 45.8cm

The bone mounts carved with samurai figures, the blade features a brass habaki (a wedge shaped metal collar used to keep the sword from falling out of the saya and to support the fittings below). 

Source & Copyright: Auction Flex