sinidentidades:

Whitey on the Moon 

A rat done bit my sister Nell.
(with Whitey on the moon)
Her face and arms began to swell.
(and Whitey’s on the moon)
I can’t pay no doctor bills.
(but Whitey’s on the moon)
Ten years from now I’ll be payin’ still.
(while Whitey’s on the moon)
You know, the man jus’ upped my rent las’ night.
(‘cause Whitey’s on the moon)
No hot water, no toilets, no lights. 
(but Whitey’s on the moon)
I wonder why he’s uppin’ me?
(‘cause Whitey’s on the moon?)
Well, I wuz already givin’ ‘im fifty a week.
(with Whitey on the moon)
Taxes takin’ my whole damn check,
T junkies makin’ me a nervous wreck,
The price of food is goin’ up,
An’ as if all that crap wuzn’t enough:
A rat done bit my sister Nell.
(with Whitey on the moon)
Her face an’ arm began to swell.
(but Whitey’s on the moon)
Was all that money I made las’ year
(for Whitey on the moon?)
How come I ain’t got no money here?
(Hmm! Whitey’s on the moon)
Y’know I jus’ ‘bout had my fill 
(of Whitey on the moon)
I think I’ll sen’ these doctor bills,
Airmail special
(to Whitey on the moon) 

                              — Gil Scott-Heron

‘From the Ruins of Empire’ - An engaging account of how intellectuals in Asia and the Middle East responded to European imperialism by Pankaj Mishra

Was there even an “east” at all? How much – apart from the pain of being condescended to, ruled and humiliated in countless ways by Europeans and Americans – did the very different faiths, languages and historical communities of the lands between the Mediterranean and the Pacific really share? The truth is that cosmopolitans – whether anti-colonial or communist – were generally let down by the 20th century and the rapid spread of nationalism across the colonial world in the hands of technocrats, military men and party officials. By the 1930s, at the latest, pan-Islamism and pan-Arabism were both dead as political projects; neither Nasser nor (much later) al-Qaeda had any chance of reviving them. As for pan-Asianism, it was pretty much dealt a deathblow once the Japanese turned it into an excuse for their own version of imperialism.

A disparate bunch, Mishra’s preferred thinkers are wanderers, anti-colonial cosmopolitans who dream of new alliances of peoples and who warn of western materialism and the need to preserve spirituality and faith across borders.

From the Ruins of Empire offers an engaging account of how, at the apogee of European global hegemony, Arab, Persian, Indian, Chinese and Japanese intellectuals responded to the intrusion of colonisers, diplomats and merchants. Dreaming of resistance and re-assertion, they advocated solidarity – sometimes of Muslims, sometimes of Asians – and they felt deep humiliation at their helplessness in the face of the global imbalance of power. The idea that what was happening was some vast clash between the forces of western modernity and eastern tradition has long underpinned a rather benign and often frankly celebratory view of “the expansion of Europe”. Mishra accepts the paradigm but there is nothing very positive about the story as seen through the eyes of its victims and critics.

(Source: mehreenkasana, via fuckyeahsouthasia)

"[Feminist work] risks being undone [by] young white privileged women who strive to create a narrative of feminism that recenters the experience of materially privileged white females in ways that deny race and class difference."

bell hooks, Outlaw Culture (via newwavefeminism)

(via tough-titty-deactivated20121030)

betterbooktitles:

Beatrix Potter: The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies
Reader Submission: Title and Redesign by Adam Vincentz and Norman Urban Boyer.

betterbooktitles:

Beatrix Potter: The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies

Reader Submission: Title and Redesign by Adam Vincentz and Norman Urban Boyer.

(via whatbindsyou)

si-jones:

Favorite Neuromancer excerpts 

si-jones:

Favorite Neuromancer excerpts 

(via si-jones-deactivated20120702)

douglashaddow:

Genderbait for the Nerds
“‘Cyberpunk’, as Gibson’s brand of SF soon became known, found a cultish following in the 1980s. Then the Internet hit the mass market, and he found himself routinely hailed as the ‘unchallenged guru, prophet and voice of the new cybernetic world order and virtual reality’. Not all of his admirers were fully aware of the satirical or dystopian aspects of his work, however. Among the solitary, pizza-encrusted supermen of the World Wide Web, ‘meatspace’ became a derogatory term for anything that can’t be accessed via a keyboard. Marketing departments, heartened by the ‘cyberspace’ buzz, started slapping the prefix ‘cyber-’ onto everything. And from the perspective of Californian start-up culture, Gibson’s depictions of notional borders, atrophied governments and rampant business elites didn’t look pessimistic but utopian.”
This LRB piece provides a very nice slighting of William Gibson. Not so much the writer himself, but his bastard legacy.
The problem with Gibson’s recent work (and to an extent, cyberpunk in general) isn’t so much that it’s instantly dated, but what people do with it once it’s been on the shelf for a few weeks.
In anticipating the language of tomorrow, he creates it, giving birth to the weasel words of today, which retroactively give his work a whiff of hackneyed web 2.0 marketing newspeak.
What’s unnerving about all of this is that marketing, advertising and branding may actually be structurally impervious to satire. Any intelligent commentary one puts forth can be assimilated, as it provides raw, uncooked idea-meat for those with an insatiable, cannibalistic appetite for new ways to describe the contours of the boxes and envelopes they will invariably transcend.
It reminds me of Nathan Barley, which if it had aired a couple years later, could have been passed off as a well-intentioned and honest drama about the lives of urban twentysomethings.

douglashaddow:

Genderbait for the Nerds

“‘Cyberpunk’, as Gibson’s brand of SF soon became known, found a cultish following in the 1980s. Then the Internet hit the mass market, and he found himself routinely hailed as the ‘unchallenged guru, prophet and voice of the new cybernetic world order and virtual reality’. Not all of his admirers were fully aware of the satirical or dystopian aspects of his work, however. Among the solitary, pizza-encrusted supermen of the World Wide Web, ‘meatspace’ became a derogatory term for anything that can’t be accessed via a keyboard. Marketing departments, heartened by the ‘cyberspace’ buzz, started slapping the prefix ‘cyber-’ onto everything. And from the perspective of Californian start-up culture, Gibson’s depictions of notional borders, atrophied governments and rampant business elites didn’t look pessimistic but utopian.”

This LRB piece provides a very nice slighting of William Gibson. Not so much the writer himself, but his bastard legacy.

The problem with Gibson’s recent work (and to an extent, cyberpunk in general) isn’t so much that it’s instantly dated, but what people do with it once it’s been on the shelf for a few weeks.

In anticipating the language of tomorrow, he creates it, giving birth to the weasel words of today, which retroactively give his work a whiff of hackneyed web 2.0 marketing newspeak.

What’s unnerving about all of this is that marketing, advertising and branding may actually be structurally impervious to satire. Any intelligent commentary one puts forth can be assimilated, as it provides raw, uncooked idea-meat for those with an insatiable, cannibalistic appetite for new ways to describe the contours of the boxes and envelopes they will invariably transcend.

It reminds me of Nathan Barley, which if it had aired a couple years later, could have been passed off as a well-intentioned and honest drama about the lives of urban twentysomethings.

unypl:

“Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”, by J.K. Rowling on Flickr.
Read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

unypl:

“Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone”, by J.K. Rowling on Flickr.

Read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

cuntymint:

africanabibliophile:

1890s Blacks were tortured in German concentration camps in Southwest Africa (now called Namibia) when Adolph Hitler was only a child. Colonial German doctors conducted unspeakable medical experiments on these emaciated helpless Africans decades before such atrocities were ever visited upon the Jews.
Thousands of Africans were massacred. Regrettably, historians neglected to properly register the slaughter—that is, to lift it from the footnote in history that it had been relegated to—until now.
In an attempt to give the incidents their rightful recognition in the historical context of the Holocaust, Dr. Firpo W. Carr has authored a new book entitled, Germany’s Black Holocaust: 1890–1945. In it, he reveals the startling hidden history of Black victims of the Holocaust. The mayhem and carnage date back to the turn of the 20th century, many years before there were ever any other unfortunate victims—Jew or Gentile—of the Holocaust.
Carr conducted three incredibly revealing interviews with: (1) a Black female Holocaust victim; (2) the Black commanding officer who liberated 8,000 Black men from a concentration camp; and (3) an African American medic from the all-Black medical unit that was responsible for retrieving thousands of dead bodies from Dachau. (White medical units were spared the gruesome task.)
“Kay,” the Black female Holocaust survivor, laments: “You cannot possibly comprehend the anger I have in me because of being experimented on in Dachau, and being called ‘nigger girl’ and ‘blacky’ while growing up.”
Testimonials from the Black commanding officer and African American medic are memorialized, for the first time ever, in Carr’s book. The research is based on voluminous documentation, and more.
If you are like most people, you simply have never heard the unbelievable story of Black victims of the Holocaust. You are invited to read about the human spirit’s triump over events that occurred during this horrible piece of hidden history.

This reminds me that there were black anarchists in Spain during the revolutionary war because they saw the rise of Fascism linked with the KKK and Jim Crow terrorism in the US. How many untold stories are there?

cuntymint:

africanabibliophile:

1890s Blacks were tortured in German concentration camps in Southwest Africa (now called Namibia) when Adolph Hitler was only a child. Colonial German doctors conducted unspeakable medical experiments on these emaciated helpless Africans decades before such atrocities were ever visited upon the Jews.

Thousands of Africans were massacred. Regrettably, historians neglected to properly register the slaughter—that is, to lift it from the footnote in history that it had been relegated to—until now.

In an attempt to give the incidents their rightful recognition in the historical context of the Holocaust, Dr. Firpo W. Carr has authored a new book entitled, Germany’s Black Holocaust: 1890–1945. In it, he reveals the startling hidden history of Black victims of the Holocaust. The mayhem and carnage date back to the turn of the 20th century, many years before there were ever any other unfortunate victims—Jew or Gentile—of the Holocaust.

Carr conducted three incredibly revealing interviews with: (1) a Black female Holocaust victim; (2) the Black commanding officer who liberated 8,000 Black men from a concentration camp; and (3) an African American medic from the all-Black medical unit that was responsible for retrieving thousands of dead bodies from Dachau. (White medical units were spared the gruesome task.)

“Kay,” the Black female Holocaust survivor, laments: “You cannot possibly comprehend the anger I have in me because of being experimented on in Dachau, and being called ‘nigger girl’ and ‘blacky’ while growing up.”

Testimonials from the Black commanding officer and African American medic are memorialized, for the first time ever, in Carr’s book. The research is based on voluminous documentation, and more.

If you are like most people, you simply have never heard the unbelievable story of Black victims of the Holocaust. You are invited to read about the human spirit’s triump over events that occurred during this horrible piece of hidden history.

This reminds me that there were black anarchists in Spain during the revolutionary war because they saw the rise of Fascism linked with the KKK and Jim Crow terrorism in the US. How many untold stories are there?

(via defeatmenot)


The Deliverator belongs to an elite order, a hallowed sub-category. He’s got esprit up to here. Right now he is preparing to carry out his third mission of the night. His uniform is black as activated charcoal, filtering the very light out of the air. A bullet will bounce off its arachno-fiber weave like a wren hitting a patio door, but excess perspiration wafts through it like a breeze through a freshly napalmed forest. Where his body has bony extremities, the suit has sintered armorgel: feels like gritty jello, protects like a stack of telephone books.

The Deliverator belongs to an elite order, a hallowed sub-category. He’s got esprit up to here. Right now he is preparing to carry out his third mission of the night. His uniform is black as activated charcoal, filtering the very light out of the air. A bullet will bounce off its arachno-fiber weave like a wren hitting a patio door, but excess perspiration wafts through it like a breeze through a freshly napalmed forest. Where his body has bony extremities, the suit has sintered armorgel: feels like gritty jello, protects like a stack of telephone books.

(Source: snakemantheexalted)

glass-kaleidoscope:

betterbooktitles:

Jean de Brunhoff: The Story of Babar
Reader Submission: Title by Kendra Leonard

Oh my. Yes.

glass-kaleidoscope:

betterbooktitles:

Jean de Brunhoff: The Story of Babar

Reader Submission: Title by Kendra Leonard

Oh my. Yes.

(via glasskaleidoscope)

(Source: visforvegetarian)