"After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can only rest for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities. And I dare not linger, for my long walk has just begun."

Nelson Mandela (via bheld)

(via roropcoldchain)

"After climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can only rest for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities. And I dare not linger, for my long walk has just begun."

Nelson Mandela (via bheld)

"‎Those who feel irritated by our friendship with President Gaddafi can go jump in the pool."

Nelson Mandela

Crd. Mandela was being gracious as always. I can think of much better places for them to jump (off).

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

LESSONS FOR LIVING

philipchircop:

Eleven lessons from Nelson Mandela

1. Determination in fighting for the right thing. Nelson Mandela’s fought against apartheid for was a struggle of more than 50 years from 1943 when he joined ANC to 1994 when South Africa became independent and he became president. Of these years, 27 were in prison.

2. Never sell out on your beliefs. Nelson Mandela while still serving in prison had repeated offers from the apartheid regime to accept release for independence in small portion of South Africa called the Transkei, from where he hailed from. He simply turned them all down.

3. Be ready to change your tactics. In 1960 Nelson Mandela together with other leaders set up the military wing of ANC. After being released from prison in 1990, Mandela would eventually renounce all armed tactics and once again resort to peaceful negotiations.

4. Know the facts. Mandela was an astute lawyer and during his incarceration, his jailers in the 1980s, repeatedly attempted to get him to renounce militarism; however he remained adamant in his belief that prisoners cannot enter into contracts - only free men can negotiate.

5. Admit our mistakes. In interviews later in life, Mandela admitted that the ANC had committed some human rights abuses and even criticized anyone who attempted to deny it.

6. Reconcile with your enemies. Nelson Mandela worked on the setting up the Truth & Reconciliation Commission.

7. Sharing with others. Mandela has shared his life in books and through post retirement charity organizations that work on ills affecting the world today.

8. Lead from the front. When the Springboks rugby team won the 1995 rugby world cup, Nelson Mandela presented the winner’s trophy to the Captain Francois Pienaar while wearing a replica of Pienaar’s no. 6 Springboks t-shirt. This was a symbol that served to further heal the very tangible racial tension, in South Africa.

9. Letting go. Nelson Mandela became President in 1994 and in 1999 chose not to run for a second term , yet he could have won by a landslide. He instead handed over to Thabo Mbeki.

10. Smile. Mandela is also known for his big smile when he is meeting with people all over the world.

11. Serve humbly. Graca Machel once said, “I found this simple man,” as she described him in 1998 just before they were married. Indeed his actions of “letting go” of a presidency, of forgiving his captors, serving tea to his guests, and many more are testament to the humility and person of Nelson Mandela.

The above lessons are taken from ODE MAGAZINE

A COUPLE OF QUESTIONS TO THINK ABOUT

  • Which of the above suggestions can you adopt?
  • How would the application of some or all of the above suggestions transform the world into a better place?

(Source: philipchircop, via xtremecaffeine)

artofpolitics:

Remove all repressive laws now!, African National Congress, c1990-94, South Africa. Image: CALA

artofpolitics:

Remove all repressive laws now!, African National Congress, c1990-94, South Africa. Image: CALA

LESSONS FOR LIVING

philipchircop:

Eleven lessons from Nelson Mandela

1. Determination in fighting for the right thing. Nelson Mandela’s fought against apartheid for was a struggle of more than 50 years from 1943 when he joined ANC to 1994 when South Africa became independent and he became president. Of these years, 27 were in prison.

2. Never sell out on your beliefs. Nelson Mandela while still serving in prison had repeated offers from the apartheid regime to accept release for independence in small portion of South Africa called the Transkei, from where he hailed from. He simply turned them all down.

3. Be ready to change your tactics. In 1960 Nelson Mandela together with other leaders set up the military wing of ANC. After being released from prison in 1990, Mandela would eventually renounce all armed tactics and once again resort to peaceful negotiations.

4. Know the facts. Mandela was an astute lawyer and during his incarceration, his jailers in the 1980s, repeatedly attempted to get him to renounce militarism; however he remained adamant in his belief that prisoners cannot enter into contracts - only free men can negotiate.

5. Admit our mistakes. In interviews later in life, Mandela admitted that the ANC had committed some human rights abuses and even criticized anyone who attempted to deny it.

6. Reconcile with your enemies. Nelson Mandela worked on the setting up the Truth & Reconciliation Commission.

7. Sharing with others. Mandela has shared his life in books and through post retirement charity organizations that work on ills affecting the world today.

8. Lead from the front. When the Springboks rugby team won the 1995 rugby world cup, Nelson Mandela presented the winner’s trophy to the Captain Francois Pienaar while wearing a replica of Pienaar’s no. 6 Springboks t-shirt. This was a symbol that served to further heal the very tangible racial tension, in South Africa.

9. Letting go. Nelson Mandela became President in 1994 and in 1999 chose not to run for a second term , yet he could have won by a landslide. He instead handed over to Thabo Mbeki.

10. Smile. Mandela is also known for his big smile when he is meeting with people all over the world.

11. Serve humbly. Graca Machel once said, “I found this simple man,” as she described him in 1998 just before they were married. Indeed his actions of “letting go” of a presidency, of forgiving his captors, serving tea to his guests, and many more are testament to the humility and person of Nelson Mandela.

The above lessons are taken from ODE MAGAZINE

A COUPLE OF QUESTIONS TO THINK ABOUT

  • Which of the above suggestions can you adopt?
  • How would the application of some or all of the above suggestions transform the world into a better place?

(Source: philipchircop)

"A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination."

Nelson Mandela  (via laurenbigfield)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

National liberation leaders of Africa meet: Nelson Mandela of South Africa and Moammar Gadhafi of Libya embrace in Tripoli, October 1997.
For most Africans, Qaddafi is a generous man, a humanist, known for his unselfish support for the struggle against the racist regime in South Africa. If he had been an egotist, he wouldn’t have risked the wrath of the West to help the ANC both militarily and financially in the fight against apartheid.
This was why Mandela, soon after his release from 27 years in jail, decided to break the U.N. embargo and travel to Libya on Oct. 23, 1997. For five long years, no plane could touch down in Libya because of the embargo. One needed to take a plane to the Tunisian city of Jerba and continue by road for five hours to reach Ben Gardane, cross the border and continue on a desert road for three hours before reaching Tripoli. The other solution was to go through Malta, and take a night ferry on ill-maintained boats to the Libyan coast. A hellish journey for a whole people, simply to punish one man.

Mandela didn’t mince his words when former U.S. President Bill Clinton said the visit was an “unwelcome” one: “No country can claim to be the policeman of the world and no state can dictate to another what it should do.” He added, “Those that yesterday were friends of our enemies have the gall today to tell me not to visit my brother Qaddafi. They are advising us to be ungrateful and forget our friends of the past.”
It was only on July 2, 2008, that the U.S. Congress finally voted to remove the name of Nelson Mandela and his ANC comrades from their [terrorist] blacklist, not because they realized how stupid that list was but because they wanted to mark Mandela’s 90th birthday. If the West was truly sorry for its past support for Mandela’s enemies and really sincere when they name streets and places after him, how can they continue to wage war against someone who helped Mandela and his people to be victorious: Qaddafi?
Indeed, the West still considered the South African racists to be their brothers who needed to be protected. That’s why the members of the ANC, including Nelson Mandela, were considered to be dangerous terrorists.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

National liberation leaders of Africa meet: Nelson Mandela of South Africa and Moammar Gadhafi of Libya embrace in Tripoli, October 1997.

For most Africans, Qaddafi is a generous man, a humanist, known for his unselfish support for the struggle against the racist regime in South Africa. If he had been an egotist, he wouldn’t have risked the wrath of the West to help the ANC both militarily and financially in the fight against apartheid.

This was why Mandela, soon after his release from 27 years in jail, decided to break the U.N. embargo and travel to Libya on Oct. 23, 1997. For five long years, no plane could touch down in Libya because of the embargo. One needed to take a plane to the Tunisian city of Jerba and continue by road for five hours to reach Ben Gardane, cross the border and continue on a desert road for three hours before reaching Tripoli. The other solution was to go through Malta, and take a night ferry on ill-maintained boats to the Libyan coast. A hellish journey for a whole people, simply to punish one man.

Mandela didn’t mince his words when former U.S. President Bill Clinton said the visit was an “unwelcome” one: “No country can claim to be the policeman of the world and no state can dictate to another what it should do.” He added, “Those that yesterday were friends of our enemies have the gall today to tell me not to visit my brother Qaddafi. They are advising us to be ungrateful and forget our friends of the past.”

It was only on July 2, 2008, that the U.S. Congress finally voted to remove the name of Nelson Mandela and his ANC comrades from their [terrorist] blacklist, not because they realized how stupid that list was but because they wanted to mark Mandela’s 90th birthday. If the West was truly sorry for its past support for Mandela’s enemies and really sincere when they name streets and places after him, how can they continue to wage war against someone who helped Mandela and his people to be victorious: Qaddafi?

Indeed, the West still considered the South African racists to be their brothers who needed to be protected. That’s why the members of the ANC, including Nelson Mandela, were considered to be dangerous terrorists.

"There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered."

 Nelson Mandela (via ttreasure)

(via ttreasure)

teenagewannabe:

“It always seems impossible until its done.” - Nelson Mandela

teenagewannabe:

It always seems impossible until its done.” - Nelson Mandela

(Source: youcancallmezee)

"There is no passion to be found in playing small…in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of."

Nelson Mandela (via oneatatimeplease)

suitcasesuitcase:

The cell on Robin Island where Nelson Mandela spent the majority of his prison sentence.

suitcasesuitcase:

The cell on Robin Island where Nelson Mandela spent the majority of his prison sentence.

thebloodof793:

MANDELA AND FIDEL

thebloodof793:

MANDELA AND FIDEL

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)