fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: December 29, 1890 - The U.S. 7th Cavalry carries out the Wounded Knee Massacre near Wounded Knee Creek on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. As many as 300 Lakota Sioux men, women, and children were killed, many shot in the back while trying to flee. Their bodies were left to freeze in a mass grave. Twenty-five troopers also died, and 39 were wounded (6 later died). In 2008 a petition was started demanding that the U.S. reclaim the twenty Medals of Honor that were given to the 7th Calvary for their role in the Massacre at Wounded Knee, to remove any recognition the US military bestows to its entities for the massacre, and to obtain the return of personal items taken from Lakota people at the 1890 Massacre. In 1973, the American Indian Movement (AIM) occupied Wounded Knee, noting its historic significance — a 71-day standoff ensued with federal law enforcement officials. 
(image: We Remember Wounded Knee 1890-1973 poster by Bruce Carter)
Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: December 29, 1890 - The U.S. 7th Cavalry carries out the Wounded Knee Massacre near Wounded Knee Creek on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. As many as 300 Lakota Sioux men, women, and children were killed, many shot in the back while trying to flee. Their bodies were left to freeze in a mass grave. Twenty-five troopers also died, and 39 were wounded (6 later died). In 2008 a petition was started demanding that the U.S. reclaim the twenty Medals of Honor that were given to the 7th Calvary for their role in the Massacre at Wounded Knee, to remove any recognition the US military bestows to its entities for the massacre, and to obtain the return of personal items taken from Lakota people at the 1890 Massacre. In 1973, the American Indian Movement (AIM) occupied Wounded Knee, noting its historic significance — a 71-day standoff ensued with federal law enforcement officials.

(image: We Remember Wounded Knee 1890-1973 poster by Bruce Carter)

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

selchieproductions:

[image description: Paul Raffaele said a Suruwaha girl refused to shake his hand because she wanted to kill him. In fact, he was wearing so much sun cream the Suruwaha thought he had a skin disease.]
© Survival International
Australia’s Channel 7 network has been found guilty by the press regulator of serious violations of the broadcasting code, after screening a report so extreme it was branded ‘Freakshow TV’ by Survival International.
The report labelled Brazil’s Suruwaha tribe as child murderers; ‘Stone Age’ relics; and ‘one of the worst human rights violators in the world’.
Survival complained to Australia’s regulator ACMA after Channel 7 refused Survival’s request to issue a correction to its report, broadcast on its Sunday Night programme.
In a landmark judgment, ACMA has now ruled that the Channel was guilty of breaking its racism clause – ‘provoking intense dislike, serious contempt or severe ridicule against a person or group’ – believed to be the first time it has found a broadcaster guilty of this serious offence under the 2010 TV Code. It has also ruled that the Channel was guilty of broadcasting inaccurate material.
Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This was one of the worst reports about contemporary tribal people we’d ever seen. The Indians were made out to be cruel and inhuman monsters, in the spirit of 19th century colonialist scorn for ‘primitive savages’.
‘What makes it even worse is that the Suruwaha have been under attack by fundamentalist missionaries for years, who are waging a campaign slandering them as child-murderers. The missionaries are behind a draft law to allow them to remove Indian children from their communities, something with horrifying echoes of the Stolen Generations scandal.
‘The Channel 7 crew told the Suruwaha they wanted to allow them to put their side of the story – but actually produced one of the most grotesquely distorted pictures of a tribal people we can remember. The programme even openly fundraised for the missionaries on its website. We hope this ruling will mean we’re less likely to see such dangerous rubbish on TV in the future.’
Channel 7 is seeking a judicial review of the ruling in Australia’s Federal Court.
Note to Editors:
Survival has written a set of ethical guidelines to help filmmakers work responsibly with tribal peoples. It is also using its Stamp it Out campaign to challenge racist depictions, however unwitting, in the media.
Previously, Survival has highlighted how British TV company Cicada Films was accused of irresponsibly endangering the lives of Peruvian Indians by allegedly provoking a flu epidemic amongst them; and how a TV series about an Amazonian tribe was labelled ‘staged, false, fabricated and distorted’ by experts.
Download a Survival briefing sheet on the proposed ‘Muwaji’s law’, the result of a campaign in Brazil by the fundamentalist missionary organization JOCUM (pdf, 70 KB). JOCUM are the Brazilian branch of the US organization Youth with a Mission.
Download a briefing sheet on what experts and Indians say about JOCUM’s infanticide allegations (pdf, 49 KB).
Download statements from Suruwaha Indians about the Channel 7 report (pdf, 33 KB).

selchieproductions:

[image description: Paul Raffaele said a Suruwaha girl refused to shake his hand because she wanted to kill him. In fact, he was wearing so much sun cream the Suruwaha thought he had a skin disease.]

© Survival International

Australia’s Channel 7 network has been found guilty by the press regulator of serious violations of the broadcasting code, after screening a report so extreme it was branded ‘Freakshow TV’ by Survival International.

The report labelled Brazil’s Suruwaha tribe as child murderers; ‘Stone Age’ relics; and ‘one of the worst human rights violators in the world’.

Survival complained to Australia’s regulator ACMA after Channel 7 refused Survival’s request to issue a correction to its report, broadcast on its Sunday Night programme.

In a landmark judgment, ACMA has now ruled that the Channel was guilty of breaking its racism clause – ‘provoking intense dislike, serious contempt or severe ridicule against a person or group’ – believed to be the first time it has found a broadcaster guilty of this serious offence under the 2010 TV Code. It has also ruled that the Channel was guilty of broadcasting inaccurate material.

Survival’s Director Stephen Corry said today, ‘This was one of the worst reports about contemporary tribal people we’d ever seen. The Indians were made out to be cruel and inhuman monsters, in the spirit of 19th century colonialist scorn for ‘primitive savages’.

‘What makes it even worse is that the Suruwaha have been under attack by fundamentalist missionaries for years, who are waging a campaign slandering them as child-murderers. The missionaries are behind a draft law to allow them to remove Indian children from their communities, something with horrifying echoes of the Stolen Generations scandal.

‘The Channel 7 crew told the Suruwaha they wanted to allow them to put their side of the story – but actually produced one of the most grotesquely distorted pictures of a tribal people we can remember. The programme even openly fundraised for the missionaries on its website. We hope this ruling will mean we’re less likely to see such dangerous rubbish on TV in the future.’

Channel 7 is seeking a judicial review of the ruling in Australia’s Federal Court.

Note to Editors:

  • Survival has written a set of ethical guidelines to help filmmakers work responsibly with tribal peoples. It is also using its Stamp it Out campaign to challenge racist depictions, however unwitting, in the media.

Signal boost: PhD scholarship for indigenous Australian student to study at Oxford or Cambridge University

selchieproductions:

Are you an Indigenous student preparing for post-graduate studies at Oxford or Cambridge in 2013?

Each year the Charlie Perkins Scholarship Trust offers two scholarships for Indigenous post-graduates to study for up to three years at either Oxford or Cambridge universities in the United Kingdom.

Applications for the 2013 scholarship round are now open.

To be considered for the scholarship, applicants must have applied for a course at Oxford and/or Cambridge. Applicants must also submit:

  • a cover letter
  • a curriculum vitae
  • an official transcript of university results
  • confirmation of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent
  • details for two academic referees (email and telephone numbers)

 Applications close Friday, 2 November 2012.

Find out more

(via share-biyuti)

survivalinternational:

The land is…

A history of the world’s tribal lands in under 60 seconds.

(Source: survivalinternational, via selchieproductions)

(via october-eightyeight)

"

As far as concerns Oceania , derogatory and belittling views of indigenous cultures are traceable to the early years of interactions with Europeans. The wholesale condemnation by Christian
missionaries of Oceanic cultures as savage, lascivious and barbaric has had a lasting effect on people’s views of their histories and traditions. In a number of Pacific societies people still divide their history into two parts: the era of darkness associated with savagery and barbarism; and the era of light and civilisation, ushered in by Christianity.

In Papua New Guinea European males were addressed and referred to as ‘masters’, and workers as ‘boys’. Even indigenous policemen were called ‘police boys’. This use of language helped to reinforce the colonially established social stratification along ethnic divisions.

"

Epeli Hau’ofa: Our Sea of Islands (via selchieproductions)

white ppl and the consumption of brown/indigenous women’s labour

dolgematki:

I can’t even count how many of these benevolent projects are being carried out “to elevate artisans in the poorest regions” by giving them a job sewing clothes for white people. And while I totally support the much-needed money injections as such, there’s something about the power structure of these things that is off and bothering me.

As an indigenous artist I think part of it has to be how indigenous people are only given the grunt production team status—the designs, the marketing etc. are done by white people for white people and that is where most of the money eventually flows, I surmise.

I have yet to see a single project aside of microloans that would actually center indigenous people’s own agency and artistic/entrepreneurial vision. But my thoughts on this are only half-formed, and if anyone can point me to texts, articles etc. about this, I’d be ever so grateful!

(via crankyduojar-deactivated2012073)

"A colonized mind is capable of seeing ONLY the options laid out by the coloniser […] a colonised mind is trained to be held within the limits set by the coloniser […] solutions have to come from decolonized minds that can see beyond the confines established and enforced by the coloniser […] often colonised minds will side with the coloniser against decolonized thinking and action, that is what the colonized are trained to do, that is part of the colonisation process"

Debra White Plume dropping some truth bombs (via selchieproductions)

Much like the Sámedikkit.

(via dolgematki)

(via crankyduojar-deactivated2012073)

"As the first born warriors of the Grand Canyon we refuse to become the next millennium’s world terrorists by allowing mega nuclear industrial complex mining industries to mine in the Grand Canyon."

Damon Watahomigie, Supai, delivering a powerful testimony on the destruction of his people’s homelands by uranium mining, coal fired power plants and oil and gas drilling, during a session with the UN Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Mr James Anaya. (via selchieproductions)

Dear white people: you want to know the difference between bitching about “omg the Irish were racially oppressed” and “bitching” about Slavery, Japanese Internment Camps, and the Trail of Fucking Tears?

lightspeedsound:

…Irish people being historic minorities is NO LONGER TOPICALLY RELEVANT TO A DISCOURSE ON THE CURRENT OPPRESSION OF POCS.


Seriously. 

The next time I hear the whole “omg I am irish, I was oppressed, therefore, I am a minority and not all white people are entitled and empowered” I’m going to cut a bitch.

Because last time I checked, Nobody fucking follows you around a store because you’re fucking Irish.

Nobody assumes female submission and an inability to speak English or discounts your American citizenship if you’re FUCKING IRISH. 

And nobody insists on cultural appropriation of religious/sacred garments and turning them into OFFENSIVELY LABELLED FASHION ITEMS because you’re fucking irish. 

And another thing: If by “I’m Irish,” you mean, “my ancestors came over 300 years ago and I’m actually a huge blend of different European ethnicities which are all white and I don’t actually know anything about Irish history, or culture, and my family has no real distinguishably, definite, “Irish” traditions or practices…”

…Newsflash: YOU’RE NOT. FUCKING. IRISH.

YOU are a fucking white-ass American, and that’s great for you, because nobody will ever ask you if you have a green card when you show them your american passport, no stranger will ever ask you uncomfortably intimate questions about “where you’re really from,” nobody will attack you as a mothefucking thug just by wearing a fucking hoodie, and nobody will ever fetishize your racial identity with extremely inaccurate and exotified portrayals of sacred traditions. 

Yes, you may have been bullied in school, maybe you are poor, and maybe you are gay.

IF WE ARE TAKING ABOUT RACE, NONE OF THAT IS TOPICAL TO THE CONVERSATION. IT IS SIMPLY A WAY FOR YOU TO ATTEMPT TO EXCUSE YOURSELF FROM ACCOUNTABILITY FOR YOUR UNDENIABLY RACIST ASSUMPTIONS. 

bitch, just admit it, live with it, and deal with it:

…You. are. motherfucking. RACIST.

selchieproductions:

Latin American indigenous groups join forces to fight dams© BBC Brasil
When Brazilian indigenous leader Tashka Yawanawa saw the news on television that communities from Peru were campaigning to prevent the construction of dams close to their land, he had no doubt about how he could help.
He turned on his computer, and using Skype, he contacted indigenous movements involved in the protest to offer both his support and to publicise the cause in Brazil.
“Today, indigenous groups can no longer escape the white man’s technology,” says Mr Yawanawa.
“We have to update ourselves, and prepare to face this new world.”
He belongs to the Yawanawa people, who live in the Brazilian Amazon, an area where indigenous communities have also fought many battles against hydroelectric dams.
He leads an organisation that seeks to build links with similar movements in other Latin American countries so they can learn from each other’s campaigns.
His initiative reflects an unprecedented effort among the region’s indigenous groups, as they join forces to resist major projects which they see as damaging to their territories.
It is part of a growing conflict as governments, seeking what they say is badly needed economic growth, build roads and hydro-electric dams, and exploit natural resources such as oil, copper and gold.
At the same time, indigenous groups say they are fighting to ensure that their traditional way of life is preserved.
Skype is one tool they are using to co-ordinate campaigns, alongside more traditional tactics such as adopting a unified position in international organisations including the UN and the Organisation of American States (OAS).
“We are mapping all the achievements of our fellow indigenous peoples in the continent in order to use their experiences here in Brazil,” says Marcos Apurina from the Co-ordination of Indigenous Organisations of the Brazilian Amazon (Coiab).
“Our problems are almost identical to the native peoples of other countries.”
‘Green economy’
This approach has been led by large national indigenous organisations and regional movements such as the Co-ordination of Indigenous Organisations of the Amazon Basin (Coica).
Coica operates across national boundaries, helping groups in Ecuador, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Guyana, French Guiana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela.
Coica’s work also involves organising meetings and workshops to help indigenous communities learn about international conventions, and also tips on lobbying and dealing with people in positions of power.
These gatherings allow indigenous leaders to discuss ways of putting pressure on governments to demarcate their territories.
They also discuss how international bodies can help guarantee indigenous rights or prevent major economic projects from having a detrimental impact.
“We are concerned about the new form of development known as the ‘green economy’. We understand this as an effort to exploit natural resources in indigenous territories,” says Rodrigo de la Cruz from Coica.
Several projects in the Brazil-Peru border region aim to expand the economic and transport integration between the two countries in the coming years.
The Inter-Oceanic Highway, connecting the north-west of Brazil to Peruvian ports on the Pacific coast, was inaugurated in 2011.
According to indigenous movements, this has brought several problems to the region, such as deforestation and illegal mining.
Jaime Corisepa, president of the Native Federation of Madre de Dios River and Tributaries (Fenamad), says that conditions may worsen if other projects go ahead.
One is the planned construction of six hydro-electric dams in Peru to supply the Brazilian market.
Protests forced the Peruvian government to suspend this project and to start a process of local consultation.
Using new technology and holding regional summits are ways to co-ordinate protests, but indigenous campaigners are also building on relationships that existed long before national boundaries and laws were established.
Marcela Vecchione, from the Pro-Indian Commission (CPI) in the Brazilian state of Acre, in Brazil, says that in many areas, indigenous communities are divided by artificial boundaries.
That is the case of the Manchineri people, divided by a border in 1904 when Brazil annexed the state of Acre.
“I often visit my family on the other side of the border. For me, travelling from Peru to Brazil means only crossing a river,” says Geraldo Manchineri.
But thanks to technology, communication across much longer distances has become easier.
Indigenous leaders hope to take advantage of this new way of co-ordinating and gather 1,200 people in Rio de Janeiro this June when world leaders will come together for the Rio+20 meeting.

selchieproductions:

Latin American indigenous groups join forces to fight dams
© BBC Brasil

When Brazilian indigenous leader Tashka Yawanawa saw the news on television that communities from Peru were campaigning to prevent the construction of dams close to their land, he had no doubt about how he could help.

He turned on his computer, and using Skype, he contacted indigenous movements involved in the protest to offer both his support and to publicise the cause in Brazil.

“Today, indigenous groups can no longer escape the white man’s technology,” says Mr Yawanawa.

“We have to update ourselves, and prepare to face this new world.”

He belongs to the Yawanawa people, who live in the Brazilian Amazon, an area where indigenous communities have also fought many battles against hydroelectric dams.

He leads an organisation that seeks to build links with similar movements in other Latin American countries so they can learn from each other’s campaigns.

His initiative reflects an unprecedented effort among the region’s indigenous groups, as they join forces to resist major projects which they see as damaging to their territories.

It is part of a growing conflict as governments, seeking what they say is badly needed economic growth, build roads and hydro-electric dams, and exploit natural resources such as oil, copper and gold.

At the same time, indigenous groups say they are fighting to ensure that their traditional way of life is preserved.

Skype is one tool they are using to co-ordinate campaigns, alongside more traditional tactics such as adopting a unified position in international organisations including the UN and the Organisation of American States (OAS).

“We are mapping all the achievements of our fellow indigenous peoples in the continent in order to use their experiences here in Brazil,” says Marcos Apurina from the Co-ordination of Indigenous Organisations of the Brazilian Amazon (Coiab).

“Our problems are almost identical to the native peoples of other countries.”

‘Green economy’

This approach has been led by large national indigenous organisations and regional movements such as the Co-ordination of Indigenous Organisations of the Amazon Basin (Coica).

Coica operates across national boundaries, helping groups in Ecuador, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Guyana, French Guiana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela.

Coica’s work also involves organising meetings and workshops to help indigenous communities learn about international conventions, and also tips on lobbying and dealing with people in positions of power.

These gatherings allow indigenous leaders to discuss ways of putting pressure on governments to demarcate their territories.

They also discuss how international bodies can help guarantee indigenous rights or prevent major economic projects from having a detrimental impact.

“We are concerned about the new form of development known as the ‘green economy’. We understand this as an effort to exploit natural resources in indigenous territories,” says Rodrigo de la Cruz from Coica.

Several projects in the Brazil-Peru border region aim to expand the economic and transport integration between the two countries in the coming years.

The Inter-Oceanic Highway, connecting the north-west of Brazil to Peruvian ports on the Pacific coast, was inaugurated in 2011.

According to indigenous movements, this has brought several problems to the region, such as deforestation and illegal mining.

Jaime Corisepa, president of the Native Federation of Madre de Dios River and Tributaries (Fenamad), says that conditions may worsen if other projects go ahead.

One is the planned construction of six hydro-electric dams in Peru to supply the Brazilian market.

Protests forced the Peruvian government to suspend this project and to start a process of local consultation.

Using new technology and holding regional summits are ways to co-ordinate protests, but indigenous campaigners are also building on relationships that existed long before national boundaries and laws were established.

Marcela Vecchione, from the Pro-Indian Commission (CPI) in the Brazilian state of Acre, in Brazil, says that in many areas, indigenous communities are divided by artificial boundaries.

That is the case of the Manchineri people, divided by a border in 1904 when Brazil annexed the state of Acre.

“I often visit my family on the other side of the border. For me, travelling from Peru to Brazil means only crossing a river,” says Geraldo Manchineri.

But thanks to technology, communication across much longer distances has become easier.

Indigenous leaders hope to take advantage of this new way of co-ordinating and gather 1,200 people in Rio de Janeiro this June when world leaders will come together for the Rio+20 meeting.

question to white people: do you really think indigenous people and poc are being “mollycoddled”?

neetainari:

Do you really think we get free money and extra benefits and special rights?

Do you really think we get any breaks that you don’t?

Can you point to ANY instance of this preferential treatment taking place, with sources?

Can you also explain to me HOW and WHY was it preferential and unfair, taking into account all applicable historical and socioeconomical factors?

I’m really, truly, genuinely curious.

Reblogging for relevance.

(via crankyduojar-deactivated2012073)

"And the hippies are jingling, jangling, blowing smoke all over Haight Ashbury, and they were letting their hair grow long. To the male Indian, this was a phenomenon, because for an Indian to grow his hair long was a violation of federal policy of 1906. According to the 1906 policy, food was withheld until compliance—in other words (by terms of this policy), we could be starved to death until we cut our hair."

Adam Fortunate Eagle (Red Lake Chippewa)

‘Cause there are some people who need reminding of the huge disparity between the disenfranchised natives and the hippies who continue to appropriate native cultures without a care.

(via neetainari)

(via crankyduojar-deactivated2012073)

selchieproductions:

In today’s ‘No shit, Sherlock’: UN body says that Brazil is violating indigenous rights
© Survival International
The International Labour Organization (ILO), part of the UN, has criticized the Brazilian government for failing to respect indigenous peoples’ rights.
The ILO has stated that by failing to consult Indians about the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam, Brazil has violated the ILO’s Convention 169 on indigenous peoples’ rights, to which the country is a signatory.
Brazilian Indians have held several large-scale protests against the dam, which will bring devastation to their rainforest. The uncontacted Indians living in the area could suffer the greatest impacts.
Whilst visiting Europe to raise awareness about the dam’s dangers, indigenous spokeswoman Sheyla Juruna said, ‘The dams will bring irreversible cultural, social and environmental damage. We are being treated like animals – all our rights are being violated’.
Brazil’s Public Ministry and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered the government to suspend the dam construction until the Indians’ rights are respected, but the works continue.
The ILO has urged that the Indians be consulted ‘before the possible harmful effects [of the dam] are irreversible’.
Survival is urging all governments to ratify ILO 169, the only international law for tribal peoples.

selchieproductions:

In today’s ‘No shit, Sherlock’: UN body says that Brazil is violating indigenous rights

© Survival International

The International Labour Organization (ILO), part of the UN, has criticized the Brazilian government for failing to respect indigenous peoples’ rights.

The ILO has stated that by failing to consult Indians about the construction of the Belo Monte mega-dam, Brazil has violated the ILO’s Convention 169 on indigenous peoples’ rights, to which the country is a signatory.

Brazilian Indians have held several large-scale protests against the dam, which will bring devastation to their rainforest. The uncontacted Indians living in the area could suffer the greatest impacts.

Whilst visiting Europe to raise awareness about the dam’s dangers, indigenous spokeswoman Sheyla Juruna said, ‘The dams will bring irreversible cultural, social and environmental damage. We are being treated like animals – all our rights are being violated’.

Brazil’s Public Ministry and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered the government to suspend the dam construction until the Indians’ rights are respected, but the works continue.

The ILO has urged that the Indians be consulted ‘before the possible harmful effects [of the dam] are irreversible’.

Survival is urging all governments to ratify ILO 169, the only international law for tribal peoples.

selchieproductions:

Two promotional posters for the indigenous documentary Games of the North, which, to quote the director;

follows the lives of four Native Alaskan athletes as they compete in the traditional sports of their ancestors. Mental strength and physical endurance are tested with contests of high kicking to seal hopping.

But such games are more than sport—they instill a survival instinct for living in the Arctic, building perseverance, strength and Alaska Native values. The film’s footage showcases the diverse Alaskan landscape and its peoples. Games gives viewers a first-hand glimpse of the environmental changes in the Arctic – and the effect these changes have on the traditional peoples. While filming, Stanton said, “In Point Hope, after the ice left, I remember feeling a loss. There was definitely a presence that was missing.”

“The sea ice here has been changing for the past 15 years but there was nobody to listen to us, recounted “Big Bob” Aiken, Native Games Coach and World Record Holder. “When they finally come around to listening, you know it’s a little late.”

“I feel the games are more important now, especially for the hunters who depend on the ice for survival, ‘cause of how quickly things are changing out there. It’s important to be aware of yourself and your surroundings and the games build that,” said World Champion David Thomas.