fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

“Kwame Toure (Stokely Carmichael)” by Muhammad Yugai

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

“Kwame Toure (Stokely Carmichael)” by Muhammad Yugai

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

shedsumlight:

Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965), born Malcolm Little and also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz الحاجّ مالك الشباز‎
I believe this picture is from his trip to the Middle East and West Africa, which eventually included a pilgrimage to Mecca.

Thanks to Karen for recommending her great post!

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

shedsumlight:

Malcolm X (May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965), born Malcolm Little and also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz الحاجّ مالك الشباز

I believe this picture is from his trip to the Middle East and West Africa, which eventually included a pilgrimage to Mecca.

Thanks to Karen for recommending her great post!

kemetically-ankhtified:

“The People’s Poet” Make His Transition: R.I.P. Louis Reyes Rivera

Our community has lost another great artist. Louis Reyes Rivera, prolific writer, poet, and activist, has passed.
For those who may not know  much of Rivera, he was an influential educator and artist. Steeped in a  Pan-African outlook and dedicated to teaching those around him, Louis  made numerous literary contributions. Despite earning many accolades, he  was always approachable. The winner of many literary awards came to be  known as “The People’s Poet” through his embrace of issues of everyday  folks. One of his sharpest points of focus was on the connection between  African-American and Latino culture.
Rivera was born in New York City in 1945. Raised in Brooklyn, he  would come to do some vital things in the world of activism. He was a  key person in the struggle of Black and Puerto Rican students back in  the 1960′s. Louis was a student leader in the 1969 takeover of City College, and the co-founder of The Paper, a student publication for people of  color. Without the efforts of Rivera amongst others, generations of  people of color would not have had the opportunity for higher education.
Always willing to reach back into the community and share his wealth  of knowledge, Louis could often be found at a workshop or classroom. He  would teach on the finer points of poetry, knowing your rights as a  writer, and carrying forth the history of the oppressed through artistic  means. He was a member of the National Writers Union and performed a  piece at the 30th anniversary of the organization late last year. He held workshops at the Harlem Book Fair, and performed on Def Poetry.
Louis Reyes Rivera was a conduit of information, and inspired many  artists and activists. He will definitely be missed. For paving the way  for countless students of color to gain access to public higher  education, I must say Rest in Power, and thank you. Rivera was 67 years  old.

-Marc W. Polite

kemetically-ankhtified:

“The People’s Poet” Make His Transition: R.I.P. Louis Reyes Rivera

Our community has lost another great artist. Louis Reyes Rivera, prolific writer, poet, and activist, has passed.

For those who may not know much of Rivera, he was an influential educator and artist. Steeped in a Pan-African outlook and dedicated to teaching those around him, Louis made numerous literary contributions. Despite earning many accolades, he was always approachable. The winner of many literary awards came to be known as “The People’s Poet” through his embrace of issues of everyday folks. One of his sharpest points of focus was on the connection between African-American and Latino culture.

Rivera was born in New York City in 1945. Raised in Brooklyn, he would come to do some vital things in the world of activism. He was a key person in the struggle of Black and Puerto Rican students back in the 1960′s. Louis was a student leader in the 1969 takeover of City College, and the co-founder of The Paper, a student publication for people of color. Without the efforts of Rivera amongst others, generations of people of color would not have had the opportunity for higher education.

Always willing to reach back into the community and share his wealth of knowledge, Louis could often be found at a workshop or classroom. He would teach on the finer points of poetry, knowing your rights as a writer, and carrying forth the history of the oppressed through artistic means. He was a member of the National Writers Union and performed a piece at the 30th anniversary of the organization late last year. He held workshops at the Harlem Book Fair, and performed on Def Poetry.

Louis Reyes Rivera was a conduit of information, and inspired many artists and activists. He will definitely be missed. For paving the way for countless students of color to gain access to public higher education, I must say Rest in Power, and thank you. Rivera was 67 years old.

-Marc W. Polite

(Source: revolutionary-afrolatino, via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

Happy Kwanzaa!

redguard:

Maulana Karenga of the US Organization created Kwanzaa in 1966 as the first specifically African American holiday. Karenga said his goal was to “give Blacks an alternative to the existing holiday and give Blacks an opportunity to celebrate themselves and history, rather than simply imitate the practice of the dominant society.” The name Kwanzaa derives from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, meaning first fruits of the harvest. The choice of Swahili, an East African language, reflects its status as a symbol of Pan-Africanism, especially in the 1960s.

Kwanzaa is a celebration that has its roots in the black nationalist movement of the 1960s, and was established as a means to help African Americans reconnect with their African cultural and historical heritage by uniting in meditation and study of African traditions and Nguzu Saba, the “seven principles of African Heritage” which Karenga said “is a communitarian African philosophy”:

  • Umoja (Unity): To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.
  • Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves stand up.
  • Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers’ and sisters’ problems our problems, and to solve them together.
  • Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.
  • Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.
  • Kuumba (Creativity): To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.
  • Imani (Faith): To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

WHAT IS ANTI-IMPERIALISM?Monday 28 November, 6.30pm, University of London Union



This year we have witnessed something that should be very worrying to all those that consider themselves anti-war, anti-imperialist and anti-racist. The British state has been at the head of a colonial war in North Africa, and there has been practically zero meaningful opposition to that war within Britain. In February 2003, two million people marched in London against war in Iraq. Only eight years later, all it takes is some reasonably sophisticated propaganda from the press and suddenly nobody is motivated to take a stand against wholesale destruction, widespread massacres and racist lynchings. 

The western empire is pushing its agenda of complete domination of Africa and the Middle East, by destabilising and attempting to overthrow all resistant, independence-minded states and groups (in particular Libya, Syria, Iran, Algeria, Hezbollah, Hamas). Dressing this up as a movement for democracy, they have thrown most people off the scent. We need to fully understand imperialist strategy and tactics, and develop our own strategy and tactics to oppose them. 
Speakers include: MARCEL CARTIERBronx-based rapper and activist, talking about organising against the US empire from within the belly of the beast.FRANCISCO DOMINGUEZChair of the Venezuela Solidarity Campaign, talking about opposing imperialism from a Latin American perspectiveOBIANG NSANGActivist from the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, talking about opposing imperialism from a Pan-African perspectiveDANIEL RENWICKYouth worker, writer and activist, talking about the anti-war movement in BritainThere will be rap, poetry and beatbox from Marcel Cartier, Samira Musa and more.MORE SPEAKERS/PERFORMERS TBA.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

WHAT IS ANTI-IMPERIALISM?

Monday 28 November, 6.30pm, University of London Union

This year we have witnessed something that should be very worrying to all those that consider themselves anti-war, anti-imperialist and anti-racist. The British state has been at the head of a colonial war in North Africa, and there has been practically zero meaningful opposition to that war within Britain. In February 2003, two million people marched in London against war in Iraq. Only eight years later, all it takes is some reasonably sophisticated propaganda from the press and suddenly nobody is motivated to take a stand against wholesale destruction, widespread massacres and racist lynchings. 
The western empire is pushing its agenda of complete domination of Africa and the Middle East, by destabilising and attempting to overthrow all resistant, independence-minded states and groups (in particular Libya, Syria, Iran, Algeria, Hezbollah, Hamas). Dressing this up as a movement for democracy, they have thrown most people off the scent. We need to fully understand imperialist strategy and tactics, and develop our own strategy and tactics to oppose them. 

Speakers include: 

MARCEL CARTIER
Bronx-based rapper and activist, talking about organising against the US empire from within the belly of the beast.

FRANCISCO DOMINGUEZ
Chair of the Venezuela Solidarity Campaign, talking about opposing imperialism from a Latin American perspective

OBIANG NSANG
Activist from the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, talking about opposing imperialism from a Pan-African perspective

DANIEL RENWICK
Youth worker, writer and activist, talking about the anti-war movement in Britain

There will be rap, poetry and beatbox from Marcel Cartier, Samira Musa and more.

MORE SPEAKERS/PERFORMERS TBA.

Why are the media silent about Black people being lynched alongside Gadhafi?

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

By Sukant Chandan, Sons of Malcolm

Never before has the world witnessed empire and its mercenaries (in the form of the pro-nato Libyan rebels) perform such a public gruesome crucifixion of a leader of the world anti-imperialist movement.

The lynching of Gadafi, whose videos are being paraded throughout the empire media shows us that at this moment of growing war against the Global South the empire is sending us clear message of white supremacy and wars of aggression.
The war in Libya reflects the Black Liberation struggle of Africa in the forces of the resistance, and for these reasons darker skinned people have fought disproportionally in the resistance, and have been targeted disproportionally by nato and their allies.

In the videos of Gadafi’s lynching, there are several Black people who are tied to the back of pro-nato rebel pick-up trucks. One of them, the first below, is immediately in the vicinity of Gadafi being lynched.

The second photo is taken from a clip from Al-Jazeera English, which is a piece about the lynching of Gadafi. This is a screen print, although the camera stays on this scene for 9seconds and then cuts straight to another two people in the back of pro-nato rebel trucks, including what looks like a very young black man of around 20yrs old with a lighter skinned middle aged Libyan man with an Islamic skull cap on.
The AJE piece makes no comment on this footage, which is unsurprising, as AJE and its Arabic channel have led the racist story of ‘African mercenaries’ fighting for Gadafi (to date no evidence has been provided, admitted by western media and ngos), which has helped facilitate the mass lynching of darker skinned people in Libya, including the complete destruction of the town of 25,000 mostly darker skinned Libyans in Tawergha.

As far as I am aware, I have been the only one who has commented on these images in THIS interview on Russia Today. I would encourage others to raise their voices. A small point, I was mistaken that I thought one of the black brothers was tied to vertical poles, he is actually tied to a mounted heavy artillery gun barrel on the pick-up truck which is at a 45 degree angle. He is clearly terrified and bloodied.
Why arent these images being commented on more in the media and by commentators etc? Has the lynching of black people become so acceptable?






fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

National liberation leaders of Africa meet: Nelson Mandela of South Africa and Moammar Gadhafi of Libya embrace in Tripoli, October 1997.
For most Africans, Qaddafi is a generous man, a humanist, known for his unselfish support for the struggle against the racist regime in South Africa. If he had been an egotist, he wouldn’t have risked the wrath of the West to help the ANC both militarily and financially in the fight against apartheid.
This was why Mandela, soon after his release from 27 years in jail, decided to break the U.N. embargo and travel to Libya on Oct. 23, 1997. For five long years, no plane could touch down in Libya because of the embargo. One needed to take a plane to the Tunisian city of Jerba and continue by road for five hours to reach Ben Gardane, cross the border and continue on a desert road for three hours before reaching Tripoli. The other solution was to go through Malta, and take a night ferry on ill-maintained boats to the Libyan coast. A hellish journey for a whole people, simply to punish one man.

Mandela didn’t mince his words when former U.S. President Bill Clinton said the visit was an “unwelcome” one: “No country can claim to be the policeman of the world and no state can dictate to another what it should do.” He added, “Those that yesterday were friends of our enemies have the gall today to tell me not to visit my brother Qaddafi. They are advising us to be ungrateful and forget our friends of the past.”
It was only on July 2, 2008, that the U.S. Congress finally voted to remove the name of Nelson Mandela and his ANC comrades from their [terrorist] blacklist, not because they realized how stupid that list was but because they wanted to mark Mandela’s 90th birthday. If the West was truly sorry for its past support for Mandela’s enemies and really sincere when they name streets and places after him, how can they continue to wage war against someone who helped Mandela and his people to be victorious: Qaddafi?
Indeed, the West still considered the South African racists to be their brothers who needed to be protected. That’s why the members of the ANC, including Nelson Mandela, were considered to be dangerous terrorists.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

National liberation leaders of Africa meet: Nelson Mandela of South Africa and Moammar Gadhafi of Libya embrace in Tripoli, October 1997.

For most Africans, Qaddafi is a generous man, a humanist, known for his unselfish support for the struggle against the racist regime in South Africa. If he had been an egotist, he wouldn’t have risked the wrath of the West to help the ANC both militarily and financially in the fight against apartheid.

This was why Mandela, soon after his release from 27 years in jail, decided to break the U.N. embargo and travel to Libya on Oct. 23, 1997. For five long years, no plane could touch down in Libya because of the embargo. One needed to take a plane to the Tunisian city of Jerba and continue by road for five hours to reach Ben Gardane, cross the border and continue on a desert road for three hours before reaching Tripoli. The other solution was to go through Malta, and take a night ferry on ill-maintained boats to the Libyan coast. A hellish journey for a whole people, simply to punish one man.

Mandela didn’t mince his words when former U.S. President Bill Clinton said the visit was an “unwelcome” one: “No country can claim to be the policeman of the world and no state can dictate to another what it should do.” He added, “Those that yesterday were friends of our enemies have the gall today to tell me not to visit my brother Qaddafi. They are advising us to be ungrateful and forget our friends of the past.”

It was only on July 2, 2008, that the U.S. Congress finally voted to remove the name of Nelson Mandela and his ANC comrades from their [terrorist] blacklist, not because they realized how stupid that list was but because they wanted to mark Mandela’s 90th birthday. If the West was truly sorry for its past support for Mandela’s enemies and really sincere when they name streets and places after him, how can they continue to wage war against someone who helped Mandela and his people to be victorious: Qaddafi?

Indeed, the West still considered the South African racists to be their brothers who needed to be protected. That’s why the members of the ANC, including Nelson Mandela, were considered to be dangerous terrorists.