enigmaland:

A Soviet soldier among the ruins of Stalingrad, 1943.

enigmaland:

A Soviet soldier among the ruins of Stalingrad, 1943.

(via ppsh-41)


Armed labourers of the tractor plant “Red October” (Krasny Oktyabr) during the Battle of Stalingrad, autumn 1942.

Armed labourers of the tractor plant “Red October” (Krasny Oktyabr) during the Battle of Stalingrad, autumn 1942.

(via ppsh-41)

ppsh-41:

Yugoslav partisans with Soviet officers. Novi Bečej, Yugoslavia, October 1944.

ppsh-41:

Yugoslav partisans with Soviet officers. Novi Bečej, Yugoslavia, October 1944.

(Source: ppsh-41)

imperija:

Red Army soldiers training before going to the frontline

imperija:

Red Army soldiers training before going to the frontline

(via ppsh-41)

zimnoye:

A Soviet soldier teaches partisans how to use a handgun.

zimnoye:

A Soviet soldier teaches partisans how to use a handgun.

(via ppsh-41)

thepsychopathiccosmonaut:

Stepan Vasilievich Petrenko
442 kills

thepsychopathiccosmonaut:

Stepan Vasilievich Petrenko

442 kills

(Source: imperija, via ppsh-41)

(Source: fuldagap, via ppsh-41)

severelackofimagination:


Pavlovs house; Stalingrad. Marked as a “fortress” on German maps.
Named after Sergeant Yakov Pavlov, initially with a 30 man squad this building was taken from the Germans, post capture, only 4 of the squad remained alive, Sgt Pavlov being most senior. Taking Stalin’s “not one step back” order for what it was, Sgt Pavlov quickly organised the defence of this building. Land mines, barbed wire, machine guns and anti tank guns were set up. Within days of the buildings capture, Soviet reinforcements arrived, boosting troop numbers to 25.
For 2 months straight post capture, Pavlov and his men defended this building from daily German attacks, towards the end, it was said that Pavlov and his men had to run out into the square to kick over the piles of German bodies; so that they couldn’t be used as cover for the next group. This place was a death-trap for any Germans nearby.
General Vasily Chuikov had even claimed that “more Germans died trying to take Pavlovs house than did taking Paris”

Anyway, those guys were pretty cool I thought.

severelackofimagination:

Pavlovs house; Stalingrad. Marked as a “fortress” on German maps.

Named after Sergeant Yakov Pavlov, initially with a 30 man squad this building was taken from the Germans, post capture, only 4 of the squad remained alive, Sgt Pavlov being most senior. Taking Stalin’s “not one step back” order for what it was, Sgt Pavlov quickly organised the defence of this building. Land mines, barbed wire, machine guns and anti tank guns were set up. Within days of the buildings capture, Soviet reinforcements arrived, boosting troop numbers to 25.

For 2 months straight post capture, Pavlov and his men defended this building from daily German attacks, towards the end, it was said that Pavlov and his men had to run out into the square to kick over the piles of German bodies; so that they couldn’t be used as cover for the next group. This place was a death-trap for any Germans nearby.

General Vasily Chuikov had even claimed that “more Germans died trying to take Pavlovs house than did taking Paris”

Anyway, those guys were pretty cool I thought.

(Source: vercingetori-x, via ppsh-41)

zolotoivek:

Soldiers of the Red Army touring a museum in Mongolia, c. 1939. 

zolotoivek:

Soldiers of the Red Army touring a museum in Mongolia, c. 1939. 

(via driftingfocus)

the-seed-of-europe:

A young Soviet soldier named Alexei. Died near Pogostye village in 1942. Photographed by the photo reporter of the 311th Rifle Division, D.F. Onokhin.

the-seed-of-europe:

A young Soviet soldier named Alexei. Died near Pogostye village in 1942. Photographed by the photo reporter of the 311th Rifle Division, D.F. Onokhin.

(via lenins-little-potato)

verdwijn:

A Soviet soldier tells a story to the civilians around him in Prague.

verdwijn:

A Soviet soldier tells a story to the civilians around him in Prague.

(via ppsh-41)

(Source: ppsh-41)

atruepatriot:

Lyudmila Pavilchenko 
When Russian sniper Lyudmila Pavlichenko was interviewed by Time magazine in 1942, she derided the American media.  “One reporter even criticized the length of the skirt of my uniform, saying that in America women wear shorter skirts and besides my uniform made me look fat, ” she said.  The length of skirt probably didn’t matter to the 309 Nazi soldiers Pavlichenko is credited with killing, or to the many Russians she inspired with her bravery and skill.  According to the Financial Times, Pavlichenko was born July 12, 1916, in southern Ukraine and she was a tomboy from the start. Forget playing with dolls, Pavlichenko wanted to hunt sparrows with a catapult; of course she was better at it than most of the boys her age.  When Germany declared war on Russia in 1941, Pavlichenko wanted to fight. But once she got to the front, it wasn’t as easy as she thought it would be.  “I knew my task was to shoot human beings,” she recalled in a Russian paper. “In theory that was fine, but I knew that the real thing would be completely different.” She was right. Even though Pavlichenko could see the enemy from where she was crouched during her first day on the battlefield, she couldn’t bring herself to fire. But that all changed when a German shot a young Russian soldier set up near Pavlichenko. “He was such a nice, happy boy,” she said. “And he was killed just next to me. After that, nothing could stop me.”
She is a true inspiration to me and one of the people that I look up to and will continue to remember because of the reason why she fought, for her country, for her family, for her friends, and for her fellow soldier.

atruepatriot:

Lyudmila Pavilchenko 

When Russian sniper Lyudmila Pavlichenko was interviewed by Time magazine in 1942, she derided the American media.

“One reporter even criticized the length of the skirt of my uniform, saying that in America women wear shorter skirts and besides my uniform made me look fat, ” she said.

The length of skirt probably didn’t matter to the 309 Nazi soldiers Pavlichenko is credited with killing, or to the many Russians she inspired with her bravery and skill.

According to the Financial Times, Pavlichenko was born July 12, 1916, in southern Ukraine and she was a tomboy from the start. Forget playing with dolls, Pavlichenko wanted to hunt sparrows with a catapult; of course she was better at it than most of the boys her age.

When Germany declared war on Russia in 1941, Pavlichenko wanted to fight. But once she got to the front, it wasn’t as easy as she thought it would be.

“I knew my task was to shoot human beings,” she recalled in a Russian paper. “In theory that was fine, but I knew that the real thing would be completely different.” She was right.

Even though Pavlichenko could see the enemy from where she was crouched during her first day on the battlefield, she couldn’t bring herself to fire.

But that all changed when a German shot a young Russian soldier set up near Pavlichenko. “He was such a nice, happy boy,” she said. “And he was killed just next to me. After that, nothing could stop me.”

She is a true inspiration to me and one of the people that I look up to and will continue to remember because of the reason why she fought, for her country, for her family, for her friends, and for her fellow soldier.

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

verdwijn:

Greeting the victorious Red Army in Moscow.

verdwijn:

Greeting the victorious Red Army in Moscow.

(via ppsh-41)

verdwijn:

Soviet soldier inspects his surrounding in Breslau.

verdwijn:

Soviet soldier inspects his surrounding in Breslau.

(via ppsh-41)