tooyoungforthelivingdead:

thatscienceguy:

A red hot ball of Nickel placed on a block of ice.

this is cool!

tooyoungforthelivingdead:

thatscienceguy:

A red hot ball of Nickel placed on a block of ice.

this is cool!

Grandma's Experiences Leave Epigenetic Mark on Your Genes | DiscoverMagazine.com

labrownrecluse:

queeraztlan:

mermeanie:

I’d say this brings a whole other dimension to the concept of “generational” trauma, innit?

I was just thinking about this yesterday, when a while ago I found out that my grandma and I both had really vivid dreams when we were little of an old woman grabbing our feet and pulling us out of bed…

File this under: things poc have known since 5ever but weren’t ‘logical’ before guayts proved them with science

(Source: snarkbender, via fyeahcracker)

Harvard professor looks for 'adventurous woman' who agrees to give birth to cloned Neanderthal

youngbadmanbrown:

iareconscious:

image

white people no.

(via youngbadmangone)

undeadsidhe-inthetardis:

pomnompled:

makkon:

lavenderharmony:

rainbowdash-likesgirls:

missrebellious:

alwaysblind:

metalturtle:

kcjo:

Aerogel, also know as frozen smoke, is the world’s lowest density solid, clocking in at 96% air. If you hold a small piece in your hand, it’s practically impossible to either see or feel, but if you poke it, it’s like styrofoam. It supports up to 4,000 times its own weight and can withstand a direct blast from two pounds of dynamite. It’s also the best insulator in existence.

Chemistry at its finest

can i eat that

Why don’t we use this for everything?!?

This shit is about the coolest thing ever. 

It’s such a great insulator that a thin layer of it will protect anything from the heat of a bunsen burner.

Even though it’s incredibly light and has an extremely low density, its lattice-like molecular structure makes it able to hold objects much greater in mass.

What if you got loads of it, and made a bed, you could pretend you were a pegasus

Possibly one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen.

Again, because science boner.

Ho W

undeadsidhe-inthetardis:

pomnompled:

makkon:

lavenderharmony:

rainbowdash-likesgirls:

missrebellious:

alwaysblind:

metalturtle:

kcjo:

Aerogel, also know as frozen smoke, is the world’s lowest density solid, clocking in at 96% air. If you hold a small piece in your hand, it’s practically impossible to either see or feel, but if you poke it, it’s like styrofoam. It supports up to 4,000 times its own weight and can withstand a direct blast from two pounds of dynamite. It’s also the best insulator in existence.

Chemistry at its finest

can i eat that

Why don’t we use this for everything?!?

This shit is about the coolest thing ever. 

image

It’s such a great insulator that a thin layer of it will protect anything from the heat of a bunsen burner.

image

Even though it’s incredibly light and has an extremely low density, its lattice-like molecular structure makes it able to hold objects much greater in mass.

What if you got loads of it, and made a bed, you could pretend you were a pegasus

Possibly one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen.

Again, because science boner.

Ho W

(Source: cabin-feaver)

googlypony:

Stand back - I’m about to try science

googlypony:

Stand back - I’m about to try science

(Source: nextlevelgoogly, via fishermod)

"I’m not a scientist, man. I can tell you what recorded history says, I can tell you what the Bible says, but I think that’s a dispute amongst theologians and I think it has nothing to do with the gross domestic product or economic growth of the United States. I think the age of the universe has zero to do with how our economy is going to grow. I’m not a scientist. I don’t think I’m qualified to answer a question like that. At the end of the day, I think there are multiple theories out there on how the universe was created and I think this is a country where people should have the opportunity to teach them all. I think parents should be able to teach their kids what their faith says, what science says. Whether the Earth was created in 7 days, or 7 actual eras, I’m not sure we’ll ever be able to answer that. It’s one of the great mysteries."

Marco Rubio, you guys. (via motherjones)

What I don’t understand is how people like this think parents AREN’T teaching their kids about faith and how their faith defines the creation of the universe. Like, is EVERY child a Christian? No. So, then, why should we be teaching something in school that is based on faith when there are so many different religions? Isn’t it just easier to teach the thing that is based in science and is an observable fact and leave the faith guidance up to parents?

Since when did a person’s religious education become something EVERYONE was responsible for teaching? Like, just be a parent and talk to your kid about your religious believes and stop whining about how it’s not taught in school. There’s a reason it’s not and it’s not because little Suzy is an oppressed Christian, it’s because there are other kids in her class who aren’t and ALL of them are entitled to receive a scientific education that doesn’t force them to learn about the book of genesis.

Goddamn.

(via rabblevolunteer)

(via rabblevolunteer-deactivated2013)

fisherpon:

How to Be an Alicorn by *Engrishman

fisherpon:

How to Be an Alicorn by *Engrishman

(Source: fishermod)

mothernaturenetwork:

 Spray-on clothes unveiled on chemistry lab catwalk 
As the fashion pack leave London for Milan, one designer and a professor of particle technology unveiled their own unique collection made in one afternoon with spray-on fabric. The pair, Manel Torres and Paul Luckham, are perfecting a fabric that can be sprayed onto skin and other surfaces to make clothes, medical bandages and even upholstery.
 
Torres, a visiting academic at Imperial College London, approached Luckham, an Imperial College professor of particle technology, to help him realize his dream of a spray-on garment that can be taken off, washed and worn again.
 
“Couture these days is almost dying,” Torres said. “I think here we have a good way of creating instant clothing — that is not very expensive.”
 
Torres demonstrated the process in a lab at Imperial College, spraying a T-shirt onto a model in a matter of minutes. An experience the model described as “nice, actually.”
 
“It’s like second skin,” she said.
 
The system uses short fibers, such as wool, linen or acrylic, mixed with polymers to bind them together. A solvent which evaporates on contact with a surface allows the fibers to be sprayed out of can as a liquid. The spray can be applied using an aerosol can or high pressure spray gun and the texture can be varied by changing the fibers and the numbers of layers of spray. The whole process also allows the material to be recycled.
 
“The beauty about this material is that…I will tear it into parts and I will dissolve it again with the same solvent and I will spray some of it in Rome in two days time,” Torres said.
 
Fashion is just one use of the technology and the pair have set up a company to explore other applications, such as medical patches and bandages, hygiene wipes, air fresheners and upholstery for furniture and cars. Luckham says the technology could see a change to the way we think about using fabric — for example a sterile duster could be sprayed onto a surface which needs to be cleaned.
 
“The advantage of having it in an aerosol can is that once the material is inside nothing can get in and so no germs can get inside,” he said.
 
The material can be hand-washed and Torres says more work is needed to ensure it can withstand a washing machine.

mothernaturenetwork:

Spray-on clothes unveiled on chemistry lab catwalk

As the fashion pack leave London for Milan, one designer and a professor of particle technology unveiled their own unique collection made in one afternoon with spray-on fabric. The pair, Manel Torres and Paul Luckham, are perfecting a fabric that can be sprayed onto skin and other surfaces to make clothes, medical bandages and even upholstery.
 
Torres, a visiting academic at Imperial College London, approached Luckham, an Imperial College professor of particle technology, to help him realize his dream of a spray-on garment that can be taken off, washed and worn again.
 
“Couture these days is almost dying,” Torres said. “I think here we have a good way of creating instant clothing — that is not very expensive.”
 
Torres demonstrated the process in a lab at Imperial College, spraying a T-shirt onto a model in a matter of minutes. An experience the model described as “nice, actually.”
 
“It’s like second skin,” she said.
 
The system uses short fibers, such as wool, linen or acrylic, mixed with polymers to bind them together. A solvent which evaporates on contact with a surface allows the fibers to be sprayed out of can as a liquid. The spray can be applied using an aerosol can or high pressure spray gun and the texture can be varied by changing the fibers and the numbers of layers of spray. The whole process also allows the material to be recycled.
 
“The beauty about this material is that…I will tear it into parts and I will dissolve it again with the same solvent and I will spray some of it in Rome in two days time,” Torres said.
 
Fashion is just one use of the technology and the pair have set up a company to explore other applications, such as medical patches and bandages, hygiene wipes, air fresheners and upholstery for furniture and cars. Luckham says the technology could see a change to the way we think about using fabric — for example a sterile duster could be sprayed onto a surface which needs to be cleaned.
 
“The advantage of having it in an aerosol can is that once the material is inside nothing can get in and so no germs can get inside,” he said.
 
The material can be hand-washed and Torres says more work is needed to ensure it can withstand a washing machine.

(via queensoucouyant)

neurosciencestuff:


Yamanaka invented cell time machine
Dr. Shinya Yamanaka invented a time machine.
In the simplest of terms, that’s how he and his colleagues sometimes describe their work. They take full-grown cells from humans and they regress them - they send them back in time, to their earliest, embryonic state - and then they coax them into the future, into totally new types of cells.
Last week, Yamanaka was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for his work creating induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells - cells that are genetically engineered into blank slates, allowing them to be transformed into any type of cell in the body.
His technique could allow scientists to explore human diseases like they never have before, or help doctors regenerate tissue lost to injury or illness. Using his technology, scientists can now take a skin cell and transform it into a heart cell that will actually beat in a lab dish.
“I was here, at Gladstone, the moment I learned we got human IPS cells,” said Yamanaka last month, in an interview from his part-time office at San Francisco’s Gladstone Institutes. Yamanaka did most of the IPS cell work at his main lab in Japan.
“My colleague sent me the image, and it was, wow,” Yamanaka said, offering a brief, modest smile. “We had beating human heart cells, made from IPS cells.”

Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Yamanaka invented cell time machine

Dr. Shinya Yamanaka invented a time machine.

In the simplest of terms, that’s how he and his colleagues sometimes describe their work. They take full-grown cells from humans and they regress them - they send them back in time, to their earliest, embryonic state - and then they coax them into the future, into totally new types of cells.

Last week, Yamanaka was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for his work creating induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells - cells that are genetically engineered into blank slates, allowing them to be transformed into any type of cell in the body.

His technique could allow scientists to explore human diseases like they never have before, or help doctors regenerate tissue lost to injury or illness. Using his technology, scientists can now take a skin cell and transform it into a heart cell that will actually beat in a lab dish.

“I was here, at Gladstone, the moment I learned we got human IPS cells,” said Yamanaka last month, in an interview from his part-time office at San Francisco’s Gladstone Institutes. Yamanaka did most of the IPS cell work at his main lab in Japan.

“My colleague sent me the image, and it was, wow,” Yamanaka said, offering a brief, modest smile. “We had beating human heart cells, made from IPS cells.”

Read more

(via hardhatpartycat)

unconsumption:


A new class of electronics can dissolve and disappear on a pre-set schedule, within a few minutes or a few years, depending on when you want them to go away.
They could live in the body and deliver drugs, they could stick on the exterior of buildings or tanks, and they can become compost instead of metal scrap—in other words, they turn the common conception of electronics completely upside down.
Transient electronics, as they’ve been dubbed, are a combination of silk and silicon designed to work seamlessly in our bodies and in our environments.
In a new study, researchers built a thermal device designed to monitor infection in a rodent and a 64-pixel digital camera—all from dissolvable material.

Fascinating! What if your old cellphone just disappeared? “Dissolvable material” seems kinda freaky, but … maybe a good thing if it’s real??
More: Awesome New Electronics Can Dissolve and Disappear When They’re No Longer Needed | Popular Science

unconsumption:

A new class of electronics can dissolve and disappear on a pre-set schedule, within a few minutes or a few years, depending on when you want them to go away.

They could live in the body and deliver drugs, they could stick on the exterior of buildings or tanks, and they can become compost instead of metal scrap—in other words, they turn the common conception of electronics completely upside down.

Transient electronics, as they’ve been dubbed, are a combination of silk and silicon designed to work seamlessly in our bodies and in our environments.

In a new study, researchers built a thermal device designed to monitor infection in a rodent and a 64-pixel digital camera—all from dissolvable material.

Fascinating! What if your old cellphone just disappeared? “Dissolvable material” seems kinda freaky, but … maybe a good thing if it’s real??

More: Awesome New Electronics Can Dissolve and Disappear When They’re No Longer Needed | Popular Science

(via ausetkmt)

theamericankid:

The knight can visit each square on a chess board exactly once

theamericankid:

The knight can visit each square on a chess board exactly once

(via minecanary)

(Source: klennex, via jackhawksmoor)

tooyoungforthelivingdead:

religiousragings:

and you SHOULD feel bad

I ship these things

tooyoungforthelivingdead:

religiousragings:

and you SHOULD feel bad

I ship these things

(Source: hello-jessica)

unicornresourcelocator:

Words escape me. This is brilliant.

unicornresourcelocator:

Words escape me. This is brilliant.

(via marlonbrandolookinbitch)

"And I don’t wanna talk to a scientist
All those motherfuckers lying and getting me pissed"

Pro-lifers Insane Clown Posse, “Miracles”

I’m beginning to wonder if this horrible song is just a parody of pro-lifers now. what if~

(via propaganda-for-life)

The ICP outed themselves as a Christian Rap band years ago… No way they’re smart enough to actually parody anything.