Ruger 77/44

A bolt-action rifle with an 18.5” long barrel. Chambered in .44 Magnum, the classic but distinct Ruger rotary magazine only holds 4 rounds. They do not come from the factory with a scope. Interesting rifle, the .44 Magnum is already a tested and proven hunting cartridge in large revolvers. You also see lever-action rifles in that caliber but not too often a bolt-action.

(Source: gunrunnerhell)


M1A
The civilian model of the M14, this M1A has a stock with the selector switch cutout. You can buy a “fake” selector switch to install for that complete Vietnam-era look. I saw a standard Springfield Armor M1A at a Sports Authority when I went to see what kind of ammo was left. Employee had just brought it out to fill an empty spot on the gun rack and someone pointed to it and bought it.

M1A

The civilian model of the M14, this M1A has a stock with the selector switch cutout. You can buy a “fake” selector switch to install for that complete Vietnam-era look. I saw a standard Springfield Armor M1A at a Sports Authority when I went to see what kind of ammo was left. Employee had just brought it out to fill an empty spot on the gun rack and someone pointed to it and bought it.

(Source: gunrunnerhell)

(Source: , via weaponsobssesed)

kickthegun:

The Go-Tos by ~Spreewerke

kickthegun:

The Go-Tos by ~Spreewerke

(Source: , via weaponsobssesed)


SVD
A Turkish sniper with an SVD. Aside from the gigantic optic, note the very bizarre bipod. It clamps onto the receiver like the original SVD bipod but the legs are farther ahead. Not sure if that is a Turkish design or not.

SVD

A Turkish sniper with an SVD. Aside from the gigantic optic, note the very bizarre bipod. It clamps onto the receiver like the original SVD bipod but the legs are farther ahead. Not sure if that is a Turkish design or not.

(Source: gunrunnerhell)

(Source: dataglitch, via fuckyeahvalvesoftware)

gunrunnerhell:

Dragunov SVD (A Hungarian soldier training with an SVD. Many former Com-Bloc nations fielded the SVD among other Soviet weaponry. Current military shifting has older equipment being replaced by NATO standard firearms.)

gunrunnerhell:

Dragunov SVD (A Hungarian soldier training with an SVD. Many former Com-Bloc nations fielded the SVD among other Soviet weaponry. Current military shifting has older equipment being replaced by NATO standard firearms.)

gunrunnerhell:

Sniper march… (Female Soviet soldiers on the march with their Mosin Nagan 91/30 rifles. Note that some of them are equipped with the PU scope, whereas others are not.)

gunrunnerhell:

Sniper march… (Female Soviet soldiers on the march with their Mosin Nagan 91/30 rifles. Note that some of them are equipped with the PU scope, whereas others are not.)

kakimari:

nyeeh

kakimari:

nyeeh

(via fuckyeahvalvesoftware)

(Source: first-in-firearms)

falloutgallery:

Urban Sniper

falloutgallery:

Urban Sniper

(Source: dahr)

gunrunnerhell:

Old and new… (Russian soldier, supposedly from the VDV (Airbone Troops) with a Mosin Nagant PU and the VSS Vintorez sniper rifles. Probably testing at a range or facility. You may still encounter the Mosin Nagant in the Middle East; it’s a reliable, simple design.)

gunrunnerhell:

Old and new… (Russian soldier, supposedly from the VDV (Airbone Troops) with a Mosin Nagant PU and the VSS Vintorez sniper rifles. Probably testing at a range or facility. You may still encounter the Mosin Nagant in the Middle East; it’s a reliable, simple design.)

fisherpon:

Sniper Fluttershy

fisherpon:

Sniper Fluttershy

(via fishermod)

atruepatriot:

Lyudmila Pavilchenko 
When Russian sniper Lyudmila Pavlichenko was interviewed by Time magazine in 1942, she derided the American media.  “One reporter even criticized the length of the skirt of my uniform, saying that in America women wear shorter skirts and besides my uniform made me look fat, ” she said.  The length of skirt probably didn’t matter to the 309 Nazi soldiers Pavlichenko is credited with killing, or to the many Russians she inspired with her bravery and skill.  According to the Financial Times, Pavlichenko was born July 12, 1916, in southern Ukraine and she was a tomboy from the start. Forget playing with dolls, Pavlichenko wanted to hunt sparrows with a catapult; of course she was better at it than most of the boys her age.  When Germany declared war on Russia in 1941, Pavlichenko wanted to fight. But once she got to the front, it wasn’t as easy as she thought it would be.  “I knew my task was to shoot human beings,” she recalled in a Russian paper. “In theory that was fine, but I knew that the real thing would be completely different.” She was right. Even though Pavlichenko could see the enemy from where she was crouched during her first day on the battlefield, she couldn’t bring herself to fire. But that all changed when a German shot a young Russian soldier set up near Pavlichenko. “He was such a nice, happy boy,” she said. “And he was killed just next to me. After that, nothing could stop me.”
She is a true inspiration to me and one of the people that I look up to and will continue to remember because of the reason why she fought, for her country, for her family, for her friends, and for her fellow soldier.

atruepatriot:

Lyudmila Pavilchenko 

When Russian sniper Lyudmila Pavlichenko was interviewed by Time magazine in 1942, she derided the American media.

“One reporter even criticized the length of the skirt of my uniform, saying that in America women wear shorter skirts and besides my uniform made me look fat, ” she said.

The length of skirt probably didn’t matter to the 309 Nazi soldiers Pavlichenko is credited with killing, or to the many Russians she inspired with her bravery and skill.

According to the Financial Times, Pavlichenko was born July 12, 1916, in southern Ukraine and she was a tomboy from the start. Forget playing with dolls, Pavlichenko wanted to hunt sparrows with a catapult; of course she was better at it than most of the boys her age.

When Germany declared war on Russia in 1941, Pavlichenko wanted to fight. But once she got to the front, it wasn’t as easy as she thought it would be.

“I knew my task was to shoot human beings,” she recalled in a Russian paper. “In theory that was fine, but I knew that the real thing would be completely different.” She was right.

Even though Pavlichenko could see the enemy from where she was crouched during her first day on the battlefield, she couldn’t bring herself to fire.

But that all changed when a German shot a young Russian soldier set up near Pavlichenko. “He was such a nice, happy boy,” she said. “And he was killed just next to me. After that, nothing could stop me.”

She is a true inspiration to me and one of the people that I look up to and will continue to remember because of the reason why she fought, for her country, for her family, for her friends, and for her fellow soldier.

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

(Source: sovietsky)