babylonfalling:

Jackson State Killings, May 14-15, 1970.

JACKSON, Miss. (LNS) — Jackson police chief Pierce addressed the students. “Ladies and gentlemen, we have something to tell you.” He went no further. The police turned and began firing into the crowd of 200 students who had gathered on the campus of Jackson State College, Mississippi’s largest black university. A tape made by local TV recorded more than 30 seconds of uninterrupted gunfire as hundreds of rounds of ammunition were fired through the crowd into an adjacent women’s dormitory, suddenly spotlighted by huge police searchlights.
When the cease-fire order was given, two lay dead and dozens of wounded people lay scattered in front of the dorm and in the lounge inside.
Two dead. Phillip Gibbs, a Jackson State student who was walking with his sister to the dorm, was shot as he was leaving the building with his hands over his head. He died on the way to the hospital. James Green, a senior at nearby Hills High School, returning home from his nighttime job, was killed instantly as he stood across the streets from the dorm.

babylonfalling:

Jackson State Killings, May 14-15, 1970.

JACKSON, Miss. (LNS) — Jackson police chief Pierce addressed the students. “Ladies and gentlemen, we have something to tell you.” He went no further. The police turned and began firing into the crowd of 200 students who had gathered on the campus of Jackson State College, Mississippi’s largest black university. A tape made by local TV recorded more than 30 seconds of uninterrupted gunfire as hundreds of rounds of ammunition were fired through the crowd into an adjacent women’s dormitory, suddenly spotlighted by huge police searchlights.

When the cease-fire order was given, two lay dead and dozens of wounded people lay scattered in front of the dorm and in the lounge inside.

Two dead. Phillip Gibbs, a Jackson State student who was walking with his sister to the dorm, was shot as he was leaving the building with his hands over his head. He died on the way to the hospital. James Green, a senior at nearby Hills High School, returning home from his nighttime job, was killed instantly as he stood across the streets from the dorm.

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

lightspeedsound:

Um. Wut.
What are these tags. “wonders of asia”?
seriously? 
They are school girls. Also, I’m pretty sure that this picture can’t be taken in CHINA, JAPAN, AND KOREA AT THE SAME TIME.
frickin asian melting pot syndrome.

lightspeedsound:

Um. Wut.

What are these tags. “wonders of asia”?

seriously? 

They are school girls. Also, I’m pretty sure that this picture can’t be taken in CHINA, JAPAN, AND KOREA AT THE SAME TIME.

frickin asian melting pot syndrome.

(Source: asianwonders)

kemetically-ankhtified:

“The People’s Poet” Make His Transition: R.I.P. Louis Reyes Rivera

Our community has lost another great artist. Louis Reyes Rivera, prolific writer, poet, and activist, has passed.
For those who may not know  much of Rivera, he was an influential educator and artist. Steeped in a  Pan-African outlook and dedicated to teaching those around him, Louis  made numerous literary contributions. Despite earning many accolades, he  was always approachable. The winner of many literary awards came to be  known as “The People’s Poet” through his embrace of issues of everyday  folks. One of his sharpest points of focus was on the connection between  African-American and Latino culture.
Rivera was born in New York City in 1945. Raised in Brooklyn, he  would come to do some vital things in the world of activism. He was a  key person in the struggle of Black and Puerto Rican students back in  the 1960′s. Louis was a student leader in the 1969 takeover of City College, and the co-founder of The Paper, a student publication for people of  color. Without the efforts of Rivera amongst others, generations of  people of color would not have had the opportunity for higher education.
Always willing to reach back into the community and share his wealth  of knowledge, Louis could often be found at a workshop or classroom. He  would teach on the finer points of poetry, knowing your rights as a  writer, and carrying forth the history of the oppressed through artistic  means. He was a member of the National Writers Union and performed a  piece at the 30th anniversary of the organization late last year. He held workshops at the Harlem Book Fair, and performed on Def Poetry.
Louis Reyes Rivera was a conduit of information, and inspired many  artists and activists. He will definitely be missed. For paving the way  for countless students of color to gain access to public higher  education, I must say Rest in Power, and thank you. Rivera was 67 years  old.

-Marc W. Polite

kemetically-ankhtified:

“The People’s Poet” Make His Transition: R.I.P. Louis Reyes Rivera

Our community has lost another great artist. Louis Reyes Rivera, prolific writer, poet, and activist, has passed.

For those who may not know much of Rivera, he was an influential educator and artist. Steeped in a Pan-African outlook and dedicated to teaching those around him, Louis made numerous literary contributions. Despite earning many accolades, he was always approachable. The winner of many literary awards came to be known as “The People’s Poet” through his embrace of issues of everyday folks. One of his sharpest points of focus was on the connection between African-American and Latino culture.

Rivera was born in New York City in 1945. Raised in Brooklyn, he would come to do some vital things in the world of activism. He was a key person in the struggle of Black and Puerto Rican students back in the 1960′s. Louis was a student leader in the 1969 takeover of City College, and the co-founder of The Paper, a student publication for people of color. Without the efforts of Rivera amongst others, generations of people of color would not have had the opportunity for higher education.

Always willing to reach back into the community and share his wealth of knowledge, Louis could often be found at a workshop or classroom. He would teach on the finer points of poetry, knowing your rights as a writer, and carrying forth the history of the oppressed through artistic means. He was a member of the National Writers Union and performed a piece at the 30th anniversary of the organization late last year. He held workshops at the Harlem Book Fair, and performed on Def Poetry.

Louis Reyes Rivera was a conduit of information, and inspired many artists and activists. He will definitely be missed. For paving the way for countless students of color to gain access to public higher education, I must say Rest in Power, and thank you. Rivera was 67 years old.

-Marc W. Polite

(Source: revolutionary-afrolatino, via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

hyungjk:

In reference to the distinctive art of the DPRK and the traditional rubric “painting on Wednesday” to present you an artist painting Shin Yung Heck “Our teacher.” Juche 67 (1978), 104 x 155 cm Oil on canvas.

hyungjk:

In reference to the distinctive art of the DPRK and the traditional rubric “painting on Wednesday to present you an artist painting Shin Yung Heck Our teacher.” Juche 67 (1978), 104 x 155 cm Oil on canvas.

(via fuckyeahmarxismleninism)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

WHAT IS ANTI-IMPERIALISM?Monday 28 November, 6.30pm, University of London Union



This year we have witnessed something that should be very worrying to all those that consider themselves anti-war, anti-imperialist and anti-racist. The British state has been at the head of a colonial war in North Africa, and there has been practically zero meaningful opposition to that war within Britain. In February 2003, two million people marched in London against war in Iraq. Only eight years later, all it takes is some reasonably sophisticated propaganda from the press and suddenly nobody is motivated to take a stand against wholesale destruction, widespread massacres and racist lynchings. 

The western empire is pushing its agenda of complete domination of Africa and the Middle East, by destabilising and attempting to overthrow all resistant, independence-minded states and groups (in particular Libya, Syria, Iran, Algeria, Hezbollah, Hamas). Dressing this up as a movement for democracy, they have thrown most people off the scent. We need to fully understand imperialist strategy and tactics, and develop our own strategy and tactics to oppose them. 
Speakers include: MARCEL CARTIERBronx-based rapper and activist, talking about organising against the US empire from within the belly of the beast.FRANCISCO DOMINGUEZChair of the Venezuela Solidarity Campaign, talking about opposing imperialism from a Latin American perspectiveOBIANG NSANGActivist from the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, talking about opposing imperialism from a Pan-African perspectiveDANIEL RENWICKYouth worker, writer and activist, talking about the anti-war movement in BritainThere will be rap, poetry and beatbox from Marcel Cartier, Samira Musa and more.MORE SPEAKERS/PERFORMERS TBA.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

WHAT IS ANTI-IMPERIALISM?

Monday 28 November, 6.30pm, University of London Union

This year we have witnessed something that should be very worrying to all those that consider themselves anti-war, anti-imperialist and anti-racist. The British state has been at the head of a colonial war in North Africa, and there has been practically zero meaningful opposition to that war within Britain. In February 2003, two million people marched in London against war in Iraq. Only eight years later, all it takes is some reasonably sophisticated propaganda from the press and suddenly nobody is motivated to take a stand against wholesale destruction, widespread massacres and racist lynchings. 
The western empire is pushing its agenda of complete domination of Africa and the Middle East, by destabilising and attempting to overthrow all resistant, independence-minded states and groups (in particular Libya, Syria, Iran, Algeria, Hezbollah, Hamas). Dressing this up as a movement for democracy, they have thrown most people off the scent. We need to fully understand imperialist strategy and tactics, and develop our own strategy and tactics to oppose them. 

Speakers include: 

MARCEL CARTIER
Bronx-based rapper and activist, talking about organising against the US empire from within the belly of the beast.

FRANCISCO DOMINGUEZ
Chair of the Venezuela Solidarity Campaign, talking about opposing imperialism from a Latin American perspective

OBIANG NSANG
Activist from the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party, talking about opposing imperialism from a Pan-African perspective

DANIEL RENWICK
Youth worker, writer and activist, talking about the anti-war movement in Britain

There will be rap, poetry and beatbox from Marcel Cartier, Samira Musa and more.

MORE SPEAKERS/PERFORMERS TBA.

"

“I am 25 years old now, and shacking up in my parents’ guest bedroom,” he told me. “I have successfully made four payments on my student loans in the past three and a half years. I have over $48,000 dollars of student loan debt, and absolutely nothing to show for it. No degrees. No certificates. No qualifications. I have continued my education to the best of my ability since leaving A&M, but always at community colleges and always paying for everything out of pocket. As you can imagine, since I’m not ‘qualified’ for a decent paying job, my savings for school piles up very slowly, and then disappears when August and January roll around. I haven’t been back to school in about a year now, and I currently work at Subway, making sandwiches. I don’t make my loan payments.”


He’s about to join the military because he sees it as his only option. “I am depressed at the idea of signing my life away for four years so I can fight someone else’s wars. I am angry beyond belief that it’s come to this,” he said.

"

$1 Trillion In Loans? How Student Debt Is Killing the Economy and Punishing an Entire Generation | | AlterNet

Student loans: no longer a good investment?

(via alternet-working)

Oh, I wrote this the other day. It depressed the hell out of me. 

(via champagnecandy

)

heartbreaking.

(via dopegirlfresh)

Yeah, ya see, when people ask me what my “goals” are and expect them to be college “worthy” I just tend to blow them off and laugh in their face. There is only a slight chance that you may use your certificates and such and get somewhere with them, but the main reason for you paying out of your ass for an “education” which really isn’t education at all(real knowledge is free and such) is to become a part of the beloved debt system. I’m sorry, I do not see this as an action which needs to signify anything. Usually, and especially these days, if your “education” is going to take you anywhere, it’s because you have a great deal of privilege(white, cis…etc). I find systems and societies as such to be a huge problem and why the world is failing and not only failing, but failing us. Not to mention, what are you really “learning”? Truth? History? Facts? How to help the world? Or what is deemed the correct “knowledge” to be learned of and for your use in and by the dominant class system. 
How could we pretend it’s worth anything. It is sad and pathetic.

(via jadedfucker)

(via bohemianarthouse)