goodlooksamerica:

Cane Sugar - Shilin Night Market

goodlooksamerica:

Cane Sugar - Shilin Night Market

(via taiwanesefood)

raindec:

老阿伯現魯豆乾
The old uncle’ braised food.

Braised Food used to describe meat, egg, seaweed, bean curd, etc. stewed with soy sauce and strained before serving.

 

(via taiwanesefood)

nicole-kang:

Eating Taiwan - 30 something year old Taiwanese ladies who exercise are scary… they eat, drink, and speak in large amounts. The picture don’t even account for the multiple dishes we had… 

What was I doing during all this? Getting fat while finishing up The Name of the Wind of course. 

Oh yes I forgot the earthquake which occurred.

(via taiwanesefood)

taiwanesefood:

IMG_5447 老牌黃家燉肉飯 雞腿飯 NTD 90.jpg by Ray Yu on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

IMG_5447 老牌黃家燉肉飯 雞腿飯 NTD 90.jpg by Ray Yu on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Mango Shaved Ice by foodishfetish on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Mango Shaved Ice by foodishfetish on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Fruit flavored Taiwan beer台啤水果口味 by hwgirl on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Fruit flavored Taiwan beer台啤水果口味 by hwgirl on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

麥克鷄塊? by Danburg Murmur on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

麥克鷄塊? by Danburg Murmur on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

L27664,華西街觀光夜市,華西街夜市,艋舺夜市,夜市,美食,小吃,夜景,台北市,萬華區,水果,蔬果 by sunshine莊信賢影像世界 on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

L27664,華西街觀光夜市,華西街夜市,艋舺夜市,夜市,美食,小吃,夜景,台北市,萬華區,水果,蔬果 by sunshine莊信賢影像世界 on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

char siu fan closeup - Christmas Dinner by arion» on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

char siu fan closeup - Christmas Dinner by arion» on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Pork and egg by toyohara on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Pork and egg by toyohara on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Original Recipe Fried Chicken @ KFC by yusheng on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Original Recipe Fried Chicken @ KFC by yusheng on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Double-boiled Pork Broth with Chinese Herbs 藥燉排骨 by sheraton.hongkong on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Double-boiled Pork Broth with Chinese Herbs 藥燉排骨 by sheraton.hongkong on Flickr.

taiwanesefood:

Longshan Night Market by tinonthewing on Flickr.

Pasar Malam are the best kind of Malam!

taiwanesefood:

Longshan Night Market by tinonthewing on Flickr.

Pasar Malam are the best kind of Malam!

[tw: perpetual foreigner stereotype] An Incident

fromonesurvivortoanother:

fascinasians:

colorblinding:

bluepeets:

girlwithadotcom:

This morning, there was a woman in the elevator with me as I headed to my office. I’ve never met her before. We make small talk, and she was friendly. We get off the elevator and walk in the same direction.
 
Then she asks me, “Where are you from?”
 
Now, pause.
 
I get that a lot because I’m Asian-American and I’m not a native New Yorker.
 
Now, un-pause.
 
I say, “California” because I really am from California. I grew up there.
 
Then she says, “No, no, where are you really from? Where are your parents from?”
 
Excuse me? What?
 
Now, here’s the thing. She wasn’t being racist, or malicious, or anything like that. She seemed geniunely interested and asked nicely. She really sincerely did not know that question can be offensive.
 
I tell her, and she replies, “Oh, I’m from Montreal.”
 
She went into her office after that and I went on my way, but it got me thinking.

Even being in a diverse city like NYC, this random woman still viewed me as someone who didn’t originally come from this country. Now, look, I get a lot of racist shit, usually from some drunk guy, so I don’t let the comments bother me. But today was different. I truly think this random woman did not know the non-offensive way to ask me where I was “really from.”

This incident reminds me of the stories the Jeremy Lin coverage generated, and how the Asian American Journalists Association had to put out a document to the media about the difference between Asian-American & Asian, Jeremy Lin & Yao Ming, and Taiwan & China.
 
I try to see the best in everyone, I believe that almost everyone has good intentions, and I try not to let this city’s craziness get to me. Today with this random woman, I choose to view her question as she was simply curious and didn’t know the right way to ask me where I was “really from.”

UGHHHHH. A couple of times I’ve actually said to people, “I know what you’re ACTUALLY asking, so just ask it.” Or sometimes they’ll say, “No, where are your parents from?” To which I truthfully say, “San Francisco and Tracy,” or just “also California.”

Of course, it depends on the person and the tone of the conversation at the time, but generally people get the hint. 

(What I thought was interesting was while on a cruise in Australia back in 2005, was that when people asked this, they were Australians who had never actually met an Asian American who wasn’t from Hawaii. And I was happy to indulge/educate. It wasn’t that they doubted our American-ness. They were just genuinely intrigued. North Americans from/in North America, you should know better.)

Because being Asian in America means being a perpetual foreigner.

Colorblinding I luv yew

i have this happen quite a lot. i feel like the appropriate response for me should be like this:

“where are you really fr-“

“kentucky stop asking this shit it’s racist”

Libya: One More Noose!

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

From Class Against Class!:

“U.S. imperialism invaded China’s territory of Taiwan and has occupied it for the past nine years. A short while ago it sent its armed forces to invade and occupy Lebanon. The United States has set up hundreds of military bases in many countries all over the world.

“China’s territory of Taiwan, Lebanon and all military bases of the United States on foreign soil are so many nooses round the neck of U.S. imperialism.

“The nooses have been fashioned by the Americans themselves and by nobody else, and it is they themselves who have put these nooses round their own necks, handing the ends of the ropes to the Chinese people, the peoples of the Arab countries and all the peoples of the world who love peace and oppose aggression.

“The longer the U.S. aggressors remain in those places, the tighter the nooses round their necks will become.”

Mao Zedong
Speech at the Supreme State Conference (September 8, 1958)