talesofwar:

A PPSh assembly line, probably somewhere behind the Ural moutains.

talesofwar:

A PPSh assembly line, probably somewhere behind the Ural moutains.

whitecolonialism:

December 17, 1944: Internment of Japanese-Americans Comes to an End.

On December 17th, 1944 the United States under the direction of U.S. Major General Henry C. Pratt issued Public Proclamation No. 21 stating that on January 2nd, 1945 all Japanese-Americans “evacuees” from the West Coast could return back to their homes.

The internment of Japanese-Americans began exactly ten weeks after the Empire of Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which gave authorization for the removal of any or all people from military areas. As a result the military defined the entire West Coast, home to a majority of Japanese-Americans as military area. Within a couple of months over 110,000 Japanese-Americans were relocated to internment camps built by the US military scattered all over the nation. For the next two years Japanese-Americans would live under dire living conditions and at times abuse from their military guards.

Throughout World War II ten people were found to be spies for the Empire of Japan, not one of them was of Japanese ancestry. Forty-four year would pass until Ronald Reagan and the United States made an official apology to the surviving Japanese-Americans who were relocated, and were given $20,000 tax-free.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:




The last cavalry charge in the US Army’s history occurred on January 16, 1942. The 26th Cavalry (Philippine Scouts) had been on the Bataan peninsula for a week and a half, and US-Filipino forces were still consolidating their positions and attempting to stabilize the front under continuous Japanese assault. The regiment’s Troop F, under 1st Lt Edwin P. Ramsey, was ordered to occupy the upper west coast village of Morong before the Japanese reached it. The advancing cavalrymen found hundreds of troops of the 65th Brigade entering the village, with more wading the river on the far side of the barrio. Recognizing that the situation could only be reversed by immediate bold action, Lt Ramsey ordered his 27-man lead platoon to charge into the middle of the unsuspecting Japanese. The saber was abolished in 1934; charges were conducted with .45cal pistols, and troopers were also armed with .30cal M1 Garand rifles. Ramsey led the galloping horses and yelling troopers headlong into the small village, firing at point-blank ranges. Few of the panicked Japanese returned fire and most fled across the river, where many were cut down. Ramsey established a skirmish line to hold them at bay while his two following platoons came up. There were still scattered Japanese in Morong itself; Ramsey led a few men through the village to pick off these stragglers while Japanese fire intensified from across the river. Troops of the 1st Regular Philippine Division soon arrived and the position was secured. Lt Ramsey escaped the Bataan surrender and formed the East-Central Luzon Guerrilla Area. He was later presented the Silver Star and Purple Heart for leading the last charge. 
(The last charge of any cavalry, by an Italian unit against a Soviet position, was also successful strangely enough).

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

The last cavalry charge in the US Army’s history occurred on January 16, 1942. The 26th Cavalry (Philippine Scouts) had been on the Bataan peninsula for a week and a half, and US-Filipino forces were still consolidating their positions and attempting to stabilize the front under continuous Japanese assault. The regiment’s Troop F, under 1st Lt Edwin P. Ramsey, was ordered to occupy the upper west coast village of Morong before the Japanese reached it. The advancing cavalrymen found hundreds of troops of the 65th Brigade entering the village, with more wading the river on the far side of the barrio. Recognizing that the situation could only be reversed by immediate bold action, Lt Ramsey ordered his 27-man lead platoon to charge into the middle of the unsuspecting Japanese. The saber was abolished in 1934; charges were conducted with .45cal pistols, and troopers were also armed with .30cal M1 Garand rifles. Ramsey led the galloping horses and yelling troopers headlong into the small village, firing at point-blank ranges. Few of the panicked Japanese returned fire and most fled across the river, where many were cut down. Ramsey established a skirmish line to hold them at bay while his two following platoons came up. There were still scattered Japanese in Morong itself; Ramsey led a few men through the village to pick off these stragglers while Japanese fire intensified from across the river. Troops of the 1st Regular Philippine Division soon arrived and the position was secured. Lt Ramsey escaped the Bataan surrender and formed the East-Central Luzon Guerrilla Area. He was later presented the Silver Star and Purple Heart for leading the last charge. 

(The last charge of any cavalry, by an Italian unit against a Soviet position, was also successful strangely enough).

(via asianhistory)

retrowar:

Handle equipment right

retrowar:

Handle equipment right

talesofwar:

A Sovier soldier aiming his PPSh-41 in Berlin.

talesofwar:

A Sovier soldier aiming his PPSh-41 in Berlin.

walkablebuffalo:

ROKS-2/3
A Soviet World War II portable flamethrower, it was designed so to not draw attention (as people apparently didn’t like getting burned alive), so the flamethrower itself was made to look like a service rifle and the square fuel tank resemble a regular backpack. The ROKS-3 however had a more standard cylindrical backpack. Despite it’s unique properties it was only used for a brief period from approximately 1935-1945.

(Source: walkablebuffal0, via fuckyeahsovietrussia)

talesofwar:

A Soviet sailor loading an AA gun aboard a Russian ship.

talesofwar:

A Soviet sailor loading an AA gun aboard a Russian ship.

collective-history:

Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, Allied Commander-in-Chief in the China theatre from 1942 to 1945.

collective-history:

Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, Allied Commander-in-Chief in the China theatre from 1942 to 1945.

(via asianhistory)

talesofwar:

The lend-lease deal between western allies and Russia did not only cover weapons and ammunitions supplies but also food and other industrial equipments. Here are some crates of bacon and lard being delivered to Russian troops.

Delicious lard!

talesofwar:

The lend-lease deal between western allies and Russia did not only cover weapons and ammunitions supplies but also food and other industrial equipments. Here are some crates of bacon and lard being delivered to Russian troops.

Delicious lard!

(via lenins-little-potato)

talesofwar:

A Red army scout officer, wearing the “Amoeba” camouflage cape, armed with a PPSh submachine gun.

talesofwar:

A Red army scout officer, wearing the “Amoeba” camouflage cape, armed with a PPSh submachine gun.

talesofwar:

Members of the Polish underground in summer 1944. All the fighting gear comes almost exclusively from captured German supplies. Most of the insurrection fighters expected Soviet help and air supply that never came from Stalin.

talesofwar:

Members of the Polish underground in summer 1944. All the fighting gear comes almost exclusively from captured German supplies. Most of the insurrection fighters expected Soviet help and air supply that never came from Stalin.

gunrunnerhell:

Finnish Mosin Nagant M39 (The Finns used hex receivers on their M39 rifles as opposed to the more common round receivers like the Soviets. Supposedly it was for better accuracy. Note the unique stock pattern. That is a natural wood finish on it because the Finns used Artic Birch to make their stocks. As a result you get amazing tiger stripe and flame-style grain. These are very collectable and sought after because even though the same wood is used, the patterns don’t always appear.)

gunrunnerhell:

Finnish Mosin Nagant M39 (The Finns used hex receivers on their M39 rifles as opposed to the more common round receivers like the Soviets. Supposedly it was for better accuracy. Note the unique stock pattern. That is a natural wood finish on it because the Finns used Artic Birch to make their stocks. As a result you get amazing tiger stripe and flame-style grain. These are very collectable and sought after because even though the same wood is used, the patterns don’t always appear.)

(via ppsh-41)

(via supremesoviet-deactivated201302)

imperija:

Red Army soldiers training before going to the frontline

imperija:

Red Army soldiers training before going to the frontline

(via ppsh-41)

talesofwar:

Fighting with Molotovs in Front of Notre Dame de Paris, August 1944.

talesofwar:

Fighting with Molotovs in Front of Notre Dame de Paris, August 1944.